Catalogue


From slavery to freedom : comparative studies in the rise and fall of Atlantic slavery /
Seymour Drescher ; foreword by Stanley L. Engerman.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1999.
description
xxv, 454 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
081471918X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1999.
isbn
081471918X (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4265426
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Seymour Drescher is Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has also taught at Harvard University, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, where he was a Distinguished Visiting Professor.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-12-01:
This collection of essays elaborates two ideas that have driven Drescher's work as a prominent antislavery historian for 25 years. Several articles refine his case, first stated in his Econocide (CH, Jan'78), that abolition of the British slave trade caused the decline of West Indian slavery rather than the reverse, as Eric Williams had asserted in Capitalism and Slavery (1944). Others portray British abolition as succeeding via mobilization of public opinion through religious and political institutions, rather than a hegemony of nascent capitalist interests. Both claims are advanced comparatively, with analyses of abolition in France, Holland, and Brazil. Two excellent historiographical articles lay out the contours of the debate over Williams's thesis and challenges to it such as Drescher's. A new essay (simultaneously published in Terms of Labor, ed. by Stanley Engerman, CH, Nov'99) historicizes the British debate over free and slave labor. Surveying roughly the century from 1750 to 1850, Drescher argues convincingly that a sharp focus on labor as "slave" or "free" arose and then faded away in a "dramatic interlude" that ended with the "return of the excluded middle," i.e., labor forms that relied in part on penal coercion. Graduate, faculty. T. S. Whitman; Mount St. Mary's College and Seminary
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A welcome addition to the literature on the incarceration of people who never committed the crime for which they were charged." - Trial
"Gould . . . has produced a book that will ensure that the lessons from these wrongful convictions are available for study and, we hope, remembered and used to enact needed reforms…this book is a valuable addition to what we are learning about wrongful convictions." - The Kojo Nnamdi Show, WAMU-FM ,
"The lessons learned in creating the ICVA are valuable to policymakers, activists, and lawyers on both sides of the docket." - Law and Politics Book Review
&8220;A masterpiece of the genre. . . . Few other books about wrongful conviction phenomenon have even attempted such a combination of legal theory and details from real-life wrongful conviction cases. . . . Gould's book has spawned a number of new thoughts about wrongful convictions." - Legal Times
"A thoughtful and disturbing account of his founding in 2003 of the Innocence Commission for Virginia (ICVA) to investigate wrongful convictions. . . . Written for the general public, Gould's book has important lessons for attorneys and policymakers as well." - Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Spanning four decades of debate on slavery and antislavery, this provocative volume by leading historian Seymour Drescher provides an in-depth comparative analysis of the transatlantic slave trade and abolition movements of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas, and their ongoing impact on twentieth-century politics and race relations.Leading up to his influential argument that the end of slavery was not due to economic decline, but rather caused it, Drescher's early analyses focus on the dynamic interaction of economic modernization, religion, and politics in early industrial nations. Challenging the reigning historical models, Drescher expands the scope of abolition scholarship to include such overlooked contributors to the slave question as planters, merchants, Parliament, abolitionist Saints, and the working classes.More recently, Drescher has turned his attention to the compelling new questions arising from Black-Jewish relations in the United States, the role of Jews in the Atlantic slave trade, and the comparative barbarism of two great moral evils in recent world history: slavery and the holocaust.Valuable both for the vast timespan covered and its wide geographic range,From Slavery to Freedomrepresents a major contribution to the study of slavery and abolition by one of its most distinguished historians.
Unpaid Annotation
Spanning four decades of debate on slavery and antislavery, this provocative volume by leading historian Seymour Drescher provides an in-depth comparative analysis of the transatlantic slave trade and abolition movements of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas, and their ongoing impact on twentieth-century politics and race relations.Leading up to his influential argument that the end of slavery was not due to economic decline, but rather caused it, Drescher's early analyses focus on the dynamic interaction of economic modernization, religion, and politics in early industrial nations. Challenging the reigning historical models, Drescher expands the scope of abolition scholarship to include such overlooked contributors to the slave question as planters, merchants, Parliament, abolitionist Saints, and the working classes.More recently, Drescher has turned his attention to the compelling new questions arising from Black-Jewish relations in the United States, the role of Jews in the Atlantic slave trade, and the comparative barbarism of two great moral evils in recent world history: slavery and the holocaust.Valuable both for the vast timespan covered and its wide geographic range, From Slavery to Freedom represents a major contribution to the study of slavery and abolition by one of its most distinguished historians.
Main Description
Beyond Exonerating the Innocent: Author on WAMU Radio Convicted Yet Innocent: The Legal Times Review ChoiceOutstanding Academic Title for 2008 DNA testing and advances in forensic science have shaken the foundations of the U.S. criminal justice system. One of the most visible results is the exoneration of inmates who were wrongly convicted and incarcerated, many of them sentenced to death for crimes they did not commit. This has caused a quandary for many states: how can claims of innocence be properly investigated and how can innocent inmates be reliably distinguished from the guilty? In answer, some states have created "innocence commissions" to establish policies and provide legal assistance to the improperly imprisoned. The Innocence Commissiondescribes the creation and first years of the Innocence Commission for Virginia (ICVA), the second innocence commission in the nation and the first to conduct a systematic inquiry into all cases of wrongful conviction. Written by Jon B. Gould, the Chair of the ICVA, who is a professor of justice studies and an attorney, the author focuses on twelve wrongful conviction cases to show how and why wrongful convictions occur, what steps legal and state advocates took to investigate the convictions, how these prisoners were ultimately freed, and what lessons can be learned from their experiences. Gould recounts how a small band of attorneys and other advocates in Virginia and around the country have fought wrongful convictions in court, advanced the subject of wrongful convictions in the media, and sought to remedy the issue of wrongful convictions in the political arena. He makes a strong case for the need for Innocence Commissions in every state, showing that not only do Innocence Commissions help to identify weaknesses in the criminal justice system and offer workable improvements, but also protect society by helping to ensure that actual perpetrators are expeditiously identified, arrested, and brought to trial. Everyone has an interest in preventing wrongful convictions, from police officers and prosecutors, who seek the latest and best investigative techniques, to taxpayers, who want an efficient criminal justice system, to suspects who are erroneously pursued and sometimes convicted. Free of legal jargon and written for a general audience, The Innocence Commissionis instructive, informative, and highly compelling reading.
Main Description
Spanning four decades of debate on slavery and antislavery, this provocative volume by leading historian Seymour Drescher provides an in-depth comparative analysis of the transatlantic slave trade and abolition movements of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas, and their ongoing impact on twentieth-century politics and race relations. Leading up to his influential argument that the end of slavery was not due to economic decline, but rather caused it, Drescher's early analyses focus on the dynamic interaction of economic modernization, religion, and politics in early industrial nations. Challenging the reigning historical models, Drescher expands the scope of abolition scholarship to include such overlooked contributors to the slave question as planters, merchants, Parliament, abolitionist Saints, and the working classes. More recently, Drescher has turned his attention to the compelling new questions arising from Black-Jewish relations in the United States, the role of Jews in the Atlantic slave trade, and the comparative barbarism of two great moral evils in recent world history: slavery and the holocaust. Valuable both for the vast timespan covered and its wide geographic range, From Slavery to Freedomrepresents a major contribution to the study of slavery and abolition by one of its most distinguished historians.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Figuresp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Prefacep. xxiii
Acknowledgementsp. xxv
Introductionp. 1
Capitalism and Abolition: Values and Forces in Britain, 1783-1814 (1976)p. 5
Two Variants of Anti-Slavery: Religious Organization and Social Mobilization in Britain and France, 1780-1870 (1980)p. 35
Public Opinion and the Destruction of British Colonial Slavery (1982)p. 57
The Decline Thesis of British Slavery since Econocide (1986)p. 87
Introductionp. 117
Brazilian Abolition in Comparative Perspective (1988)p. 119
British Way, French Way: Opinion Building and Revolution in the Second French Slave Emancipation (1991)p. 158
The Long Goodbye: Dutch Capitalism and Antislavery in Comparative Perspective (1994)p. 196
Servile Insurrection and John Brown's Body in Europe (1993)p. 235
Introductionp. 273
The Ending of the Slave Trade and the Evolution of European Scientific Racism (1990)p. 275
The Atlantic Slave Trade and the Holocaust: A Comparative Analysis (1996)p. 312
The Role of Jews in the Transatlantic Slave Trade (1993)p. 339
Eric Williams: British Capitalism and British Slavery (1987)p. 355
Capitalism and Slavery after Fifty Years (1997)p. 379
Free Labor vs Slave Labor: The British and Caribbean Cases (1999)p. 399
Indexp. 445
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem