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From settler to citizen : New Mexican economic development and the creation of Vecino society, 1750-1820 /
Ross Frank.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
description
xxiv, 329 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520222067 (cl. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
isbn
0520222067 (cl. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4262600
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 295-314) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Ross Frank has written a model study of New Mexico's Vecinos-a historical narrative as absorbing as it is illustrative of complex social processes." Joyce Appleby, author ofInheriting the Revolution: The first Generation of Americans "This is a richly dense and sophisticated history of eighteenth-century New Mexico that focuses on the economic and cultural foundations of identity. Deftly reading subtle changes in material culture and the organization of space, Frank provides historians of the Americas with a fresh perspective on the impact of the Bourbon Reforms at the margins of empire." RamÓn GutiÉrrez, author ofWhen Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846
Flap Copy
"Ross Frank has written a model study of New Mexico's Vecinos-a historical narrative as absorbing as it is illustrative of complex social processes."--Joyce Appleby, author of Inheriting the Revolution: The first Generation of Americans "This is a richly dense and sophisticated history of eighteenth-century New Mexico that focuses on the economic and cultural foundations of identity. Deftly reading subtle changes in material culture and the organization of space, Frank provides historians of the Americas with a fresh perspective on the impact of the Bourbon Reforms at the margins of empire."--Ramón Gutiérrez, author of When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-07-01:
Meticulous scholarship in the genre of New Western history is found here at its best. The author focuses on economic developments within the cultural and social contexts of the peoples in the subregion of New Mexico during the waning years of Spanish control, 1750-1820. Frank (history, Univ. of California, San Diego) reveals that "intensive economic growth" evolved in the 1780s and grew over the next 30 years, with vecinos (non-native settlers) dominating the economy while usurping "Pueblo ... lands, markets, and craft production." It is this burgeoning economic growth, Frank suggests, that "created the roots of the Hispanic culture that still enriches the region." He adds that by 1821, economic activities in New Mexico were such that traditional interpretations of the Santa Fe Trail's impact upon the region--bringing "commercial enterprise [there] for the first time"--are suspect. New Mexican economic enterprises were "reoriented" by the trade but not "overwhelmed" by it. An insightful book for economic, social, cultural, and ethnic historians, and for those with interests in Southwestern Americana. Illustrations and tables; notes; glossary; bibliography; and index. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The arts-and-crafts tradition of the American Southwest illustrates this economic and social history of colonial New Mexico, casting light on the development of its Hispanic community and its changing relationship with the Pueblo Indians.
Long Description
The unique arts-and-crafts tradition of the American Southwest illuminates this economic and social history of colonial New Mexico, casting new light on the development of New Mexico's Hispanic community and its changing relationship with Pueblo Indians. Ross Frank's analysis of Pueblo Indian pottery, Pueblo and Spanish blankets, and Spanish religious images--orsantos--links economic change to social and cultural change in this region. Using these cultural artifacts to gauge shifts in power and status, Frank charts the creation of a culturally innovative and dominating Hispanic settler--orvecino--community during the final decades of the eighteenth century. Contrary to previous views of this period as an economic backwater, Frank shows that Spanish New Mexico instead experienced growth that tied the region closely to colonial economic reforms of the Spanish empire. The resulting economic boom dramatically altered the balance of power between the Spanish settlers and the Pueblo Indians, giving the vecinos the incentive and the means to exploit their Pueblo Indian neighbors. Frank shows that the vecinos used different strategies to take control of the Pueblo textile and pottery trade. The Hispanic community began to define its cultural identity through the economic and social subordination of the Pueblo Indians. Connecting economic change to powerful cultural and social changes, Frank provides a new understanding of this "borderlands" region of northern New Spain in relatoin to the Spanish colonial history of Mexico. At the same time,From Settler to Citizenrecovers the previously unexplored history of an important Hispanic community.
Main Description
A history of colonial New Mexico. By looking at who made and exported pottery, rugs, and religious art--and how that changed over time--the author demonstrates the way Spanish settlers established power over Pueblo Indians in the region. The book shows how controlling those crafts meant controlling the economy and politics of early Santa Fe.
Main Description
The unique arts-and-crafts tradition of the American Southwest illuminates this economic and social history of colonial New Mexico, casting new light on the development of New Mexico's Hispanic community and its changing relationship with Pueblo Indians. Ross Frank's analysis of Pueblo Indian pottery, Pueblo and Spanish blankets, and Spanish religious images--or santos--links economic change to social and cultural change in this region. Using these cultural artifacts to gauge shifts in power and status, Frank charts the creation of a culturally innovative and dominating Hispanic settler--or vecino--community during the final decades of the eighteenth century. Contrary to previous views of this period as an economic backwater, Frank shows that Spanish New Mexico instead experienced growth that tied the region closely to colonial economic reforms of the Spanish empire. The resulting economic boom dramatically altered the balance of power between the Spanish settlers and the Pueblo Indians, giving the vecinos the incentive and the means to exploit their Pueblo Indian neighbors. Frank shows that the vecinos used different strategies to take control of the Pueblo textile and pottery trade. The Hispanic community began to define its cultural identity through the economic and social subordination of the Pueblo Indians. Connecting economic change to powerful cultural and social changes, Frank provides a new understanding of this "borderlands" region of northern New Spain in relatoin to the Spanish colonial history of Mexico. At the same time, From Settler to Citizenrecovers the previously unexplored history of an important Hispanic community.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
A Note about Translations
Abbreviations
Introductionp. 1
"Like a Ball in the Hands of Fortune": New Mexican Economy through the 1770sp. 13
"If We Should Lose New Mexico a Second Time": Bourbon Reform, Indian Policy, and the Alliances of the 1780sp. 65
"This Type of Commerce Cannot Remedy Itself": Obstacles to Economic Growth in New Mexico and the Bourbon Responsep. 76
New Mexican Economic Development, 1780-1820p. 119
Creating Vecinos: Cultural Transformationp. 176
Conclusionp. 223
Notesp. 235
Glossary of Colonial Spanish Termsp. 285
Bibliographyp. 295
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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