Catalogue

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Literary circles and cultural communities in Renaissance England /
edited by Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2000.
description
ix, 243 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0826213170 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2000.
isbn
0826213170 (alk. paper)
general note
"The original, abbreviated versions of the essays collected here were presented at the thirteenth biennial Renaissance conference at the University of Michigan--Dearborn, October 15-17, 1998"--P. 16.
Includes index.
catalogue key
4252704
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
Although the literary circle is widely recognized as a significant feature of Renaissance literary culture, it has received remarkably little examination. In this collection of essays, the authors attempt to explain literary circles and cultural communities in Renaissance England by exploring both actual and imaginary ways in which they were conceived and the various needs they fulfilled. The book also pays considerable attention to larger theoretical issues relating to literary circles. The essayists raise important questions about the extent to which literary circles were actual constructs or fictional creations. Whether illuminating or limiting, the circle metaphor itself can be extended or reformulated. Some of the authors discuss how particular circles actually operated, and some question the very concept of the literary circle. Literary Circles and Cultural Communities in Renaissance Englandwill be an important addition to seventeenth-century studies.
Main Description
Although the literary circle is widely recognized as a significant feature of Renaissance literary culture, it has received remarkably little examination. In this collection of essays, the authors attempt to explain literary circles and cultural communities in Renaissance England by exploring both actual and imaginary ways in which they were conceived and the various needs they fulfilled. The book also pays considerable attention to larger theoretical issues relating to literary circles. The essayists raise important questions about the extent to which literary circles were actual constructs or fictional creations. Whether illuminating or limiting, the circle metaphor itself can be extended or reformulated. Some of the authors discuss how particular circles actually operated, and some question the very concept of the literary circle.Literary Circles and Cultural Communities in Renaissance Englandwill be an important addition to seventeenth-century studies.
Unpaid Annotation
Although the literary circle is widely recognized as a significant feature of Renaissance literary culture, it has received remarkably little examination. In this collection of essays, the authors attempt to explain literary circles and cultural communities in Renaissance England, including both actual and fictive communities such as the Overbury circle, the Donne coterie, Jonson and the Sons of Ben, the Cavendish or Newcastle network, the Stanley circle, and the Great Tew alliance. The volume explores the varied ways in which they were conceived and the diverse needs they fulfilled. While the emphasis is primarily on particular circles, attention is also paid to larger theoretical issues relating to literary circles and to the broader and more general concept of cultural communities.The essayists raise important questions about the extent to which literary circles are themselves actual constructs or fictional creations, about how the concept of a literary circle may be illuminating or limiting, and about how the circle metaphor itself can be extended or reformulated. Some of the contributors discuss how particular circles actually operated, some attempt to illustrate the varied effects of specific networks on individual writers, and others question the very concept of the literary circle. Main points of interest for the authors range from the illumination of particular communities to how aspects of literary circles can elucidate specific works or the entire literary system.Demonstrating how careful scrutiny of literary circles -- in their many and varied forms -- greatly enriches our understanding and appreciation of early modern literature, Literary Circles and CulturalCommunities in Renaissance England is an important addition to seventeenth-century studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Of Circles, Friendship, and the Imperatives of Literary Historyp. 10
"Like a spyed Spie": Donne's Baiting of Marlowep. 24
"To all vertuous Ladies in generall": Aemilia Lanyer's Community of Strong Womenp. 44
The Invention of the Literary Circle of Sir Thomas Overburyp. 59
"This Art Will Live": Social and Literary Responses to Ben Jonson's New Innp. 75
Newcastle's Ghosts: Robert Payne, Ben Jonson, and the "Cavendish Circle"p. 92
Reading Poets Reading Poets: Herbert and Crashaw's Literary Ellipsep. 115
A Space for Academic Recreation: Milton's Proposal in The Reason of Church-governmentp. 128
Thomas Stanley and "A Register of Friends"p. 148
Community and Social Order in the Great Tew Circlep. 173
"The Great Difference of Time": The Great Tew Circle and the Emergence of the Neoclassical Modep. 187
Conversation, Conversion, Messianic Redemption: Margaret Fell, Menasseh ben Israel, and the Jewsp. 210
Notes on the Contributorsp. 235
Index of Works Citedp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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