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Cervantes and the comic mind of his age /
Anthony Close.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
viii, 375 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198159986 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198159986 (hbk.)
abstract
This text relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it.
catalogue key
4238079
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [341]-360) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
Close (Cambridge) undertakes an especially ambitious project: an exploration of Cervantes's conception of comedy and an elaboration of the ways in which his comic vision differs from, and distances itself from, the writings of his contemporaries. Close is best known for The Romantic Approach to Don Quixote (CH, Jul'78), a brilliant treatment of the reception history of the novel, with emphasis on how Romanticism in Germany and elsewhere essentially reconfigured the protagonist. His object here is equally broad and more abstract. Following the lead of E.C. Riley's Cervantes's Theory of the Novel (1962), mentioned with reverence throughout the study, Close seeks a poetics of comedy within the fictions. Arguing for Cervantes's overriding interest in "the truth of the history," Close attributes Cervantes's originality and sophistication to his ability to synthesize oppositions that other creative minds of the period tended to perceive as separate and irreconcilable. Cervantes's mastery of the art of assimilation becomes the link to his comic vision and the principal marker of difference. In the act of redefining fiction, Cervantes redefines verisimilitude and expands the space of comedy. Close's readings are learned, insightful, and engaging, as are his informed entries into the imagination of the writers under scrutiny. Highly recommended for graduate and research libraries. E. H. Friedman; Vanderbilt University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Anthony Close's study is a ground-breaking work. It offers a magisterial survey of comedy in early modern Spain.
Close makes a most convincing and well-grounded case that Cervantes's Quijote and other works were primarily written for comical purposes.
'Close's readings are learned, insightful, and engaging, as are his informed entries into the imagination of the writers under scrutiny.'E.H. Friedman, Choice, April 2001
'Close's readings are learned, insightful, and engaging, as are hisinformed entries into the imagination of the writers under scrutiny.'E.H. Friedman, Choice, April 2001
"Extremely scholarly and deeply considered.... Cervantes's poetics of comedy are formed in the cross-currents [of the picaresque, the comedia, and the novella]....Few have charted these currents as knowledgeably and as subtly as Anthony Close does in this book."--Times Literary Supplement
"Extremely scholarly and deeply considered.... Cervantes's poetics of comedy are formed in the cross-currents [of the picaresque, the comedia, and the novella]....Few have charted these currents as knowledgeably and as subtly as Anthony Close does in this book."-- Times Literary Supplement
It is a book to be enjoyed by the non-specialist since the author has provided English translations to all his questions, and the index is very full and easy to use.
One of the many merits of Close's book lies in showing how Cervantes's comic works of the 1600s emerge as a reaction against the comic fiction of his contemporaries ... impressive.
'Part two is quite brilliant ... Cervante's poetics of comedy are formed in the cross-currents of these and many other works of the period. Few have charted these currents as knowledgeably and as subtly as Anthony Close does in this book'B.W.Ife, Times Literary Supplement
'Part two is quite brilliant ... Cervante's poetics of comedy are formedin the cross-currents of these and many other works of the period. Few havecharted these currents as knowledgeably and as subtly as Anthony Close does inthis book'B.W.Ife, Times Literary Supplement
Abbreviations. Introduction I: Cervantess Poetics of Comic Fiction Basic Values of Comedy and Satire The Prologue to Don Quijote R Part I and its Implications The Truth of History, I: Relevance and Rhetorical Pitch The Truth of History, II: Making Present II: Cervantes and the comic mind of the Spanish Golden Age Evolution of Spanish Attitudes to comedy, 1500-1600 Socio-genesis, ideology, and culture The New Comic Ethos: Social and Aesthetic Premises Cervantes between Guzman de Alfarache and its Heritage Bibliography Index
'Part two is quite brilliant ... Cervante's poetics of comedy are formed in the cross-currents of these and many other works of the period. Few have charted these currents as knowledgeably and as subtly as Anthony Close does in this book'B.W.Ife, Times Literary Supplement'Close's readings are learned, insightful, and engaging, as are his informed entries into the imagination of the writers under scrutiny.'E.H. Friedman, Choice, April 2001
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Choice, April 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it.
Long Description
This book relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it. This collective mentality underwent significant evolution in the period 1500 to 1630, and the factors which caused it are reflected in the ways in which the major comic genres (satire, the picaresque, the comedia, the novella) are re-launched, transformed, and theoretically rationalized around 1600, the moment when Don Quijote and Cervantes's most famous novelas were written. Though Cervantes is universally acknowledged to be a master of comic fiction, his poetics have never before been considered from that specific angle, nor in such ample scope. In particular, the book sets itself to identify the differences between that poetics and the conceptions of comic fiction of his contemporaries, including Mateo Alemán.
Main Description
This book relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it. This collective mentality underwent significant evolution in the period 1500 to1630, and the factors which caused it are reflected in the ways in which the major comic genres (satire, the picaresque, the comedia, the novella) are re-launched, transformed, and theoretically rationalized around 1600, the moment when Don Quijote and Cervantes's most famous novelas were written.Though Cervantes is universally acknowledged to be a master of comic fiction, his poetics have never before been considered from that specific angle, nor in such ample scope. In particular, the book sets itself to identify the differences between that poetics and the conceptions of comic fiction ofhis contemporaries, including Mateo Aleman.
Main Description
This book relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it. This collective mentality underwent significant evolution in the period 1500 to 1630, and the factors which caused it are reflected in the ways in which the major comic genres--satire, the picaresque, the comedia , the novella--are re-launched, transformed, and theoretically rationalized around 1600, the moment when Don Quijote and Cervantes's most famous novelas were written. Though Cervantes is universally acknowledged to be a master of comic fiction, his poetics have never before been considered from that specific angle, nor in such ample scope. In particular, the book sets itself to identify the differences between that poetics and the conceptions of comic fiction of his contemporaries, including Mateo Alem n.
Main Description
This book relates Cervantes's poetics of comic fiction to the common framework of assumptions, values, and ideas held by Spaniards of the Golden Age about the comic and the kinds of writing which expressed it. This collective mentality underwent significant evolution in the period 1500 to 1630, and the factors which caused it are reflected in the ways in which the major comic genres--satire, the picaresque, the comedia , the novella--are re-launched, transformed, and theoretically rationalized around 1600, the moment when Don Quijote and Cervantes's most famous novelas were written. Though Cervantes is universally acknowledged to be a master of comic fiction, his poetics have never before been considered from that specific angle, nor in such ample scope. In particular, the book sets itself to identify the differences between that poetics and the conceptions of comic fiction of his contemporaries, including Mateo Alemán.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Introduction
Cervantess Poetics of Comic Fiction Basic Values of Comedy and Satire
The Prologue
Part I and its Implications
The Truth of History, I: Relevance and Rhetorical Pitch
The Truth of History, II: Making Present
Cervantes and the comic mind of the Spanish
Golden Age Evolution of Spanish
Attitudes to comedy, 1500-1600
Socio-genesis, ideology, and culture
The New Comic Ethos: Social and Aesthetic
Premises Cervantes between Guzman de Alfarache and its Heritage
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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