Catalogue


Activist rhetorics and American higher education, 1885-1937 /
Susan Kates.
imprint
Carbondale, Ill. : Southern Illinois University Press, c2001.
description
xvi, 157 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0809323400 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Carbondale, Ill. : Southern Illinois University Press, c2001.
isbn
0809323400 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4229037
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 141-148) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Susan Kates is an assistant professor of English and women's studies at the University of Oklahoma.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-06-01:
The importance of knowing history cannot be overemphasized, and Kates (English, Univ. of Oklahoma) points out why in her preface: knowing historical roots promotes understanding and inspiration. She uncovers rhetorical roots--the timeless and situational ever inherent in the discipline of rhetoric. Nineteenth-century situational concerns are at issue here: gender in texts by Mary Augusta Jordan (at Smith College), race in texts by Halli Quinn Brown (at Wilberforce University), and labor in texts of Josephine Colby, Helen Norton, and Louis Budenz (at Brookwood Labor College). Linking language with identity, this pioneering rhetoric taught that subjects for papers should relate to lived experience, elocutionary assignments should use African American literature as well as the classics, and ideological and social values and activities should be engaged in thinking, writing, and speaking. The rhetoric texts and pedagogy advanced in the prevailing 19th-century elitist male climate sought to deny rigid correctness in the face of change, human needs, and richness and multiplicity of experience. The fifth and last chapter offers examples of rhetoric texts that continue to aright by wider perspective mainstream history. Enthusiastically recommended for college undergraduates as well as graduate students in rhetoric, history, social science, and women's studies. T. B. Dykeman Fairfield University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Kates's definition of ‘activist rhetoric' provides a much-needed foundation for further study and development of this important pedagogical concept."--Karyn Hollis, Villanova University
"Kates's definition of ‘activist rhetor
"Kates's definition of 'activist rhetoric' provides a much-needed foundation for further study and development of this important pedagogical concept."Karyn Hollis, Villanova University
"Kates's definition of ‘activist rhetoric' provides a much-needed foundation for further study and development of this important pedagogical concept."-- Karyn Hollis , Villanova University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In this study of the history of rhetoric education, Susan Kates focuses on the writing and speaking instruction developed at three academic institutions founded to serve three groups of students most often excluded from traditional institutions of higher education in late-nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century America: white middle-class women, African Americans, and members of the working class. Kates provides a detailed look at the work of those students and teachers ostracized from rhetorical study at traditional colleges and universities. She explores the pedagogies of educators Mary Augusta Jordan of Smith College in Northhampton, Massachusetts; Hallie Quinn Brown of Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio; and Josephine Colby, Helen Norton, and Louise Budenz of Brookwood Labor College in Katonah, New York. These teachers sought to enact forms of writing and speaking instruction incorporating social and political concerns in the very essence of their pedagogies. They designed rhetoric courses characterized by three important pedagogical features: a profound respect for and awareness of the relationship between language and identity and a desire to integrate this awareness into the curriculum; politicized writing and speaking assignments designed to help students interrogate their marginalized standing within the larger culture in terms of their gender, race, or social class; and an emphasis on service and social responsibility.
Unpaid Annotation
In this study of the history of rhetoric education, Susan Kates focuses on the writing and speaking instruction developed at three academic institutions founded to serve three groups of students most often excluded from traditional institutions of higher education in late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century America: white middle-class women, African Americans, and members of the working class.Kates explores the pedagogies of educators Mary Augusta Jordan of Smith College in Northhampton, Massachusetts; Hallie Quinn Brown of Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio; and Josephine Colby, Helen Norton, and Louise Budenz of Brookwood Labor College in Katonah, New York.These teachers sought to enact forms of writing and speaking instruction incorporating social and political concerns in the very essence of their pedagogies. They designed rhetoric courses characterized by three important pedagogical features: a profound respect for and awareness of the relationship between language and identity and a,desire to integrate this awareness into the curriculum; politicized writing and speaking assignments designed to help students interrogate their marginalized standing within the larger culture in terms of their gender, race, or social class; and an emphasis on service and social responsibility.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. IX
Prefacep. XI
Acknowledgmentsp. XV
Educational Politics: Rhetorical Instruction and the Disenfranchised Studentp. 1
Gender and Rhetorical Study: The Pedagogical Legacy of Mary Augusta Jordanp. 27
Elocution and African American Culture: The Pedagogy of Hallie Quinn Brownp. 53
Ideology and Rhetorical Instruction: Brookwood Labor Collegep. 75
Borderlands, Intersections, and Ongoing History: Rhetoric and Activism in Higher Educationp. 97
Notesp. 135
Works Citedp. 141
Indexp. 149
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem