Catalogue

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The boy king : Edward VI and the protestant reformation /
Diarmaid MacCulloch.
edition
1st Palgrave ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001, c1999.
description
xviii, 283 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0312238304 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001, c1999.
isbn
0312238304 (hardback)
general note
Originally published: Tudor church militant. London : A. Lane, 1999.
catalogue key
4213527
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 250-265) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Diarmaid MacCulloch is a Fellow of St. Cross College, Oxford, and Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2001-04-01:
Award-winning author MacCulloch (Thomas Cranmer: A Life) has written an interesting and informative study of the six years the young Edward VI spent on the throne after the death of his notorious father Henry VIII. Only nine when he came to power in 1547, the young king is often overlooked, sandwiched as he was between his infamous father and two extraordinary sisters, "Bloody" Mary and Elizabeth I. Edward was every bit as intelligent as his sisters, and his religious convictions were as inflexible as those of the formidable Mary. Indeed, the author makes a point of following up any description of atrocities committed in Edward's reign with the information that Mary did worse. The boy king who tried to bypass his sisters and put the unfortunate Lady Jane Grey on the throne in their stead is a worthy subject of this enjoyable and very readable book. The subject, however, is not one of universal interest, recommending this book for academic libraries with collections in the area of English history and the Reformation. Elizabeth Mellett, Brookline P.L., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"MacCulloch's enviable ease in unraveling complex theological and political positions ... makes this a formidable achievement. A dramatic period of English history will never look quite the same again." The Independent "This is Reformation history as it should be written, learned, argumentative, and ... never for a moment dull." The London Times "Award-winning author MacCulloch has written an interesting and informative study...enjoyable and very readable book." Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
Edward VI, the only surviving son of Henry VIII and the last of the male Tudors, died while still a teenager. Yet his reign has a significance in English history out of all proportion to its brief six-year span. In this lavishly illustrated book, Diarmaid MacCulloch looks at the life and beliefs of the young king and the ruthless politicians around him. Although the regime collapsed in apparent failure on Edward's death in 1553, a second half-sister, Elizabeth, brought Protestantism back. MacCulloch traces the strange afterlife of Edward's reign, its surprising connections with the civil wars which convulsed the British Isles a century later, and the effect it still has on English life.
Main Description
The boy king Edward VI, the only surviving son of Henry VIII and the last of the male Tudors, died while still a teenager, his plans for his country's future soon to be overturned by his Roman Catholic half-sister Mary. Yet his reign has a significance in English history out of all proportion to its brief six-year span. In this lavishly illustrated book, Diarmaid MacCulloch underlines the significance of Edward's turbulent and neglected reign. He takes a fresh look at the life and beliefs of the young king and of the ruthless politicians who jostled for power around him and analyzes the single-minded strategy for bringing in the Protestant revolution. Although the regime collapsed in apparent failure and disgrace on Edward's death in 1553, the story does not end there; a second half-sister, Elizabeth, succeeded Mary and brought Protestantism back to the official Church, though in a subtly different form. The tensions between her vision of the Church and that of the dead boy king continued to haunt English religion. MacCulloch traces the strange afterlife of Edward's reign, its surprising connections with the civil wars which convulsed the British Isles a century later, and the effect it still has on English life.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Abbreviations used in the text and bibliographyp. xvii
Dramatis Personaep. 1
King Josiah: Purifying the Realmp. 57
King Solomon: Building the Templep. 105
The Afterlife of the Edwardian Reformationp. 157
Notesp. 223
Bibliographyp. 250
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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