Catalogue


The quarrel of Macaulay and Croker : politics and history in the age of reform /
William Thomas.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
vi, 339 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198208642
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198208642
catalogue key
4206500
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [317]-328) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A thoroughly researched and gracefully written volume.
Connoisseurs of historical writing will appreciate this account of the quarrel between Croker and Macaulay, like a mature 'grand cru' from an Oxford college cellar.
'Connoisseurs of historical writing will appreciate this acount of the quarrel between Croker and Macoulay, like a mature 'grand cru' form an Oxford college cellar.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
'Even-handedness and commitment are ... characteristic of Thomas's work.'History of European Ideas 27
'forgotten skirmishes come triumpantly to life in William Thomas's substantial and elegant study of politics in literature, which reminds us of how much we can still learn from the great nineteenth-century periodicals.'Pergamon - History of European Ideas 27
'... He does so with elegance and economy, recalling the lost truth that it is possible to write books that are short and crisp rather than vast and soggy ... There is much in these essays to entertain and savour. Read them beside the fire after dark, on a day when you suspect, like Croker,that all is up with England.'Michael Bentley, The Times Literary Supplement
In this vivid book, William Thomas shows how the two main players both lived up to and often defied their stereotypes.
'In this vivid book, William Thomas shows how the two main players both lived up to and often defied their stereotypes.'Andrew Lycett, Spectator
'This is a good book in a grand tradition: like Burke, like Macaulay and Criker, Thomas helps us to see and to understand the interactions of individuals, institutions, culture and society.'Pergamon - History of European Ideas 27
Thomas argues that majestic narrative and stylistic flair have lured posterity into an unthinking admiration for Macaulay's History. Meanwhile Croker, now a largely forgotten figure, has been written off as a rancorous party hack and reactionary Tory. This study seeks to adjust the historical ledger and put the record straight.
'thoughtful study'History, vol. 86, no. 284
William Thomas deploys his deep knowledge of the 1830s and 40s ... Thomas writes recalling the lost truth that it is possible to write books that are short and crisp rather than vast and soggy ... There is much in these essays to entertain and savour. Read them beside the fire after dark, on a day when you suspect, like Croker, that all is up with England.
'This is a good book in a grand tradition: like Burke, like Macaulay and Criker, Thomas helps us to see and to understand the interactions of individuals, institutions, culture and society.'Pergamon - History of European Ideas 27'Even-handedness and commitment are ... characteristic of Thomas's work.'History of European Ideas 27'forgotten skirmishes come triumpantly to life in William Thomas's substantial and elegant study of politics in literature, which reminds us of how much we can still learn from the great nineteenth-century periodicals.'Pergamon - History of European Ideas 27'thoughtful study'History, vol. 86, no. 284'Connoisseurs of historical writing will appreciate this acount of the quarrel between Croker and Macoulay, like a mature 'grand cru' form an Oxford college cellar.'History, vol. 86, no. 284'... He does so with elegance and economy, recalling the lost truth that it is possible to write books that are short and crisp rather than vast and soggy ... There is much in these essays to entertain and savour. Read them beside the fire after dark, on a day when you suspect, like Croker, that all is up with England.'Michael Bentley, The Times Literary Supplement'In this vivid book, William Thomas shows how the two main players both lived up to and often defied their stereotypes.'Andrew Lycett, Spectator
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the story of one of the great literary rows of the 19th century, between a historian and a critic. The author shows that Croker's political opinions were less rancorous and more interesting and Macaulay's scholarship was not faultless.
Long Description
This is the story of one of the great literary rows of the nineteenth century, between one of its greatest historians and one of its sharpest critics. The quarrel began in the House of Commons during the debates of 1831-2 on parliamentary reform and was continued in the quarterly reviews. Even in a political setting, it had a historical dimension. Croker taunted Macaulay for being ignorant of the French Revolution. Macaulay replied by pouring scorn on Croker's accuracy as editor of Boswell's Johnson. The bitterness of the clash made subsequent compromise impossible. Sixteen years later, Croker wrote a long damning review of the first two volumes of Macaulay's History of England. Posterity admires success, and as Macaulay's writings have eclipsed Croker's it has usually been assumed that Croker was moved by mere political spite. In this highly readable study, William Thomas shows that this verdict is unfair, that Croker's political opinions were both less rancorous and more interesting, and that Macaulay's own scholarship was far from faultless. He also considers each man's historical writing alongside his politics and argues that, while Croker's critical method was sharpened by his politics, Macaulay's political opinions were much more independent of party, and that he is not the typical Whig historian of legend. William Thomas illustrates how the two men actually had many ideas in common, and the commentators who have seen only political dislike have missed the real purpose of the History of England and what made it the most successful historical work in English literature.
Main Description
'A thoroughly researched and gracefully written volume.' -Parliamentary History'William Thomas deploys his deep knowledge of the 1830s and 40s... Thomas writes recalling the lost truth that it is possible to write books that are short and crisp rather than vast and soggy... There is much in these essays to entertain and savour. Read them beside the fire after dark, on a day when you suspect, like Croker, that all is up with England.' -Michael Bentley, Times Literary Supplement'This is a good book in a grand tradition: like Burke, like Macaulay and Criker, Thomas helps us to see and to understand the interactions of individuals, institutions, culture and society.' -History of European Ideas'Connoisseurs of historical writing will appreciate this account of the quarrel between Croker and Macaulay, like a mature 'grand cru' from an Oxford college cellar.' -History'In this vivid book, William Thomas shows how the two main players both lived up to and often defied their stereotypes.' -Andrew Lycett, SpectatorThis is the story of one of the great literary rows of the nineteenth century, between one of its greatest historians and one of its sharpest critics. The quarrel began in the House of Commons during the debates of 1831-2 on parliamentary reform and was continued in the quarterly reviews. In this highly readable study, William Thomas offers a new perspective and insight into the quarrel and its ramifications, and provides a nuanced assessment of the protagonists and their work.
Main Description
This is the story of one of the great literary rows of the nineteenth century, between one of its greatest historians and one of its sharpest critics. The quarrel began in the House of Commons during the debates of 1831-2 on parliamentary reform and was continued in the quarterly reviews. Evenin a political setting, it had a historical dimension. Croker taunted Macaulay for being ignorant of the French Revolution. Macaulay replied by pouring scorn on Croker's accuracy as editor of Boswell's Johnson. The bitterness of the clash made subsequent compromise impossible. Sixteen years later,Croker wrote a long damning review of the first two volumes of Macaulay's History of England. Posterity admires success, and as Macaulay's writings have eclipsed Croker's it has usually been assumed that Croker was moved by mere political spite. In this highly readable study, William Thomas shows that this verdict is unfair, that Croker's political opinions were both less rancorous and more interesting, and that Macaulay's own scholarship was far from faultless. He also considers each man's historical writing alongside his politics andargues that, while Croker's critical method was sharpened by his politics, Macaulay's political opinions were much more independent of party, and that he is not the typical Whig historian of legend. William Thomas illustrates how the two men actually had many ideas in common, and the commentatorswho have seen only political dislike have missed the real purpose of the History of England and what made it the most successful historical work in English literature.
Main Description
This is the story of one of the great literary rows of the nineteenth century, between one of its greatest historians and one of its sharpest critics. The quarrel began in the House of Commons during the debates of 1831-2 on parliamentary reform and was continued in the quarterly reviews. Inthis highly readable study, William Thomas offers a new perspective and insight into the quarrel and its ramifications, and provides a nuanced assessment of the protagonists and their work.
Main Description
This is the story of one of the great literary rows of the nineteenth century, between one of its greatest historians and one of its sharpest critics. The quarrel began in the House of Commons during the debates of 1831-2 on parliamentary reform and was continued in the quarterly reviews. In this highly readable study, William Thomas offers a new perspective and insight into the quarrel and its ramifications, and provides a nuanced assessment of the protagonists and their work.

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