Catalogue


Illegitimate theatre in London, 1770-1840 /
Jane Moody.
imprint
Cambridege ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
description
xiv, 278 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521563763
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridege ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
isbn
0521563763
catalogue key
4203885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Illegitimate Theatre does more than enough in recreating and celebrating the energy and multifariousness of unlicensed drama. Like the productions it describes, its exuberant detail can be breathtaking. ... an impressively scholarly piece of work ... a pleasurable read.' Romanticism
'Illegitimate Theatre does more than enough in recreating and celebrating the energy and multifariousness of unlicensed drama. Like the productions it describes, its exuberant detail can be breathtaking. ... an impressively scholarly piece of work ... a pleasurable read.'Romanticism
‘Illegitimate Theatre does more than enough in recreating and celebrating the energy and multifariousness of unlicensed drama. Like the productions it describes, its exuberant detail can be breathtaking. … an impressively scholarly piece of work … a pleasurable read.‘Romanticism
"Moody...provides previously unavailable terms, contexts, and interpretive frameworks in a work of materialist criticism of great imagination." European Romantic Review
'Moody's book is rich in detailed research and vivid examples, and she never loses the sense of vitality and entertainment that lies at the heart of her subject ... an indispensable contribution to the study of theatrical culture in the period.' New Theatre Quarterly
'Moody's book is rich in detailed research and vivid examples, and she never loses the sense of vitality and entertainment that lies at the heart of her subject ... an indispensable contribution to the study of theatrical culture in the period.'New Theatre Quarterly
'This is exciting work.' History
'This is exciting work.'History
‘This is exciting work.’History
"Original research...great insight...This is a notable contribution, analytically and methodologically, to our understanding of theater and politics." Nineteenth Century Studies
‘Moody‘s book is rich in detailed research and vivid examples, and she never loses the sense of vitality and entertainment that lies at the heart of her subject … an indispensable contribution to the study of theatrical culture in the period.‘New Theatre Quarterly
"Rigorously researched and superbly written, this study opens new dimensions of inquiry for romanticists and theater historians alike." Studies in Romanticism
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book explores the institutions, genres, and performance history of an illegitimate theatre which emerged in British dramatic culture towards the end of the eighteenth century.
Description for Bookstore
Towards the end of the eighteenth century, a major transformation took place in British dramatic culture with the emergence of an illegitimate theatre and the struggle between London's patent playhouses (Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and the Haymarket) and the new, so-called minor theatres. This is the first book to explore the institutions, genres, and performance history of this illegitimate theatre. Jane Moody's lively account considers the prohibition of tragedy and comedy at London's minor theatres, interpretations of Shakespeare, and describes the ingenious ways in which performers circumnavigated the law.
Main Description
Toward the end of the eighteenth century, a major transformation took place in British dramatic culture with the emergence of an illegitimate theater and the struggle between London's patent playhouses (Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and the Haymarket) and the new, so-called minor theaters. This is the first book to explore the institutions, genres, and performance history of this illegitimate theater. Jane Moody's lively account considers the prohibition of tragedy and comedy at London's minor theaters, interpretations of Shakespeare, and describes the ingenious ways in which performers circumnavigated the law.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Illegitimate Theatre in London, 1770-1840' represents an important contribution to our understanding of 19th century cultural politics and also offers a powerful critique of theatre's position in the literary history of Romanticism.
Main Description
Towards the end of the eighteenth century, a major transformation took place in British dramatic culture. At the heart of that transformation was the controversial emergence of an illegitimate theatre, and a cultural struggle between London's patent playhouses (Drury Lane, Covent Garden and the Haymarket) and the new, so-called minor theatres. This was the first book to explore the institutions, genres, and performance history of this illegitimate theatre. Jane Moody's lively and original account considers the prohibition of tragedy and comedy at London's minor theatres and describes the various ingenious ways in which performers circumnavigated the law. Moody brings to light illicit productions of Shakespeare and the minor theatres' fascination with dramatic subjects censored on the legitimate stage. Illegitimate Theatre represents an important contribution to our understanding of nineteenth-century cultural politics and also offers a powerful critique of theatre's position in the literary history of Romanticism.
Main Description
Towards the end of the eighteenth century, a major transformation took place in British dramatic culture. At the heart of that transformation was the controversial emergence of an illegitimate theatre, and a cultural struggle between London's patent playhouses (Drury Lane, Covent Garden and the Haymarket) and the new, so-called minor theatres. This was the first book to explore the institutions, genres, and performance history of this illegitimate theatre. Jane Moody's lively account considers the prohibition of tragedy and comedy at London's minor theatres and describes the various ingenious ways in which performers circumnavigated the law. Moody brings to light illicit productions of Shakespeare and the minor theatres' fascination with dramatic subjects censored on the legitimate stage. Illegitimate Theatre represents an important contribution to our understanding of nineteenth-century cultural politics and also offers a powerful critique of theatre's position in the literary history of Romanticism.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Prologue
The invention of illegitimate culture
The disintegration of legitimate theatre
Illegitimate production
Illegitimate Shakespeares
Reading the theatrical city
Westminster laughter
Illegitimate celebrities
Epilogue
Select bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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