Catalogue


Time exposure : the personal experience of time in secular societies /
Richard K. Fenn.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
viii, 166 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0195139534 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0195139534 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4150964
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-09-01:
A secular society, according to Fenn (Princeton Theological Seminary), is self-organizing and self-referential. That means it is thrown on its own nonprovidential, nontranscendent resources when it comes to making meaning of life and its vicissitudes. In the religion-fatigued West, the passing of time marks us and holds us to its secular standards. According to Fenn, that is the inevitable outcome of Christianity's own internal logic. The book is interesting, nuanced, perhaps a little obscure. It has the feel of a phenomenological study--what would it be like to find oneself in a secular world?--yet there are no references to the important studies of temporality and time consciousness in that tradition. Recommended only for upper-division undergraduates, graduates, and researchers/faculty. R. Severson Marylhurst University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In a masterful rethinking of secularization theory, Fenn suggests that we focus upon the experience of time, the subjugation to the mere passage of time that, in whatever form, defines secularity. Whether discussing grief or mourning, rituals or merely varieties of waiting, Fenn makes thehaunting case that the final fruits of Christianity are found in an experience of the temporal that no longer foreshadows the eternal. The loss of transcendence leaves individuals to recognize the self-justifying nature of societies that can provide no providential shelter from the relentlesspassage of time as it moves toward a death that itself foreshadows only uncertainty. This book is a must read for all whose faith have left them with nothing, so to speak, but time." --Ralph Hood Editor, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
"In a masterful rethinking of secularization theory, Fenn suggests that wefocus upon the experience of time, the subjugation to the mere passage of timethat, in whatever form, defines secularity. Whether discussing grief ormourning, rituals or merely varieties of waiting, Fenn makes the haunting casethat the final fruits of Christianity are found in an experience of the temporalthat no longer foreshadows the eternal. The loss of transcendence leavesindividuals to recognize the self-justifying nature of societies that canprovide no providential shelter from the relentless passage of time as it movestoward a death that itself foreshadows only uncertainty. This book is a mustread for all whose faith have left them with nothing, so to speak, but time."--Ralph Hood Editor, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
"In this unusual and powerful book, the author, a sociologist and a theologian, pursues a rich and many-layered discourse on the way time is used (and abused) in contemporary secular society. Ingeniously exploiting diverse and unlikely sources, he illustrates how public and privateperceptions of time and commemoration take on diverging symbolic meaning for modern man, who is at once both the creation and the victim of the secularization process. With rare eloquence and subtlety, Fenn examines the secularizing approach to time to be found in the gospels, the Church,contemporary film and drama, to produce a work of impressive originality. Even before one has finished reading this book for the first time, one knows that one will certainly read it again." Bryan Wilson, All Souls College, Oxford
"In this unusual and powerful book, the author, a sociologist and atheologian, pursues a rich and many-layered discourse on the way time is used(and abused) in contemporary secular society. Ingeniously exploiting diverseand unlikely sources, he illustrates how public and private perceptions of timeand commemoration take on diverging symbolic meaning for modern man, who is atonce both the creation and the victim of the secularization process. With rareeloquence and subtlety, Fenn examines the secularizing approach to time to befound in the gospels, the Church, contemporary film and drama, to produce a workof impressive originality. Even before one has finished reading this book forthe first time, one knows that one will certainly read it again." Bryan Wilson,All Souls College, Oxford
"Richard Fenn is one of the most original and dulcet voices in the study of religion."--Nicholas Jay Demerath, III, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
"Richard Fenn is one of the most original and dulcet voices in the studyof religion."--Nicholas Jay Demerath, III, University of Massachusetts atAmherst
"Richard Fenn is one of the most original and dulcet voices in the study of religion."--Nicholas Jay Demerath, III, University of Massachusetts at Amherst"In a masterful rethinking of secularization theory, Fenn suggests that we focus upon the experience of time, the subjugation to the mere passage of time that, in whatever form, defines secularity. Whether discussing grief or mourning, rituals or merely varieties of waiting, Fenn makes the haunting case that the final fruits of Christianity are found in an experience of the temporal that no longer foreshadows the eternal. The loss of transcendence leavesindividuals to recognize the self-justifying nature of societies that can provide no providential shelter from the relentless passage of time as it moves toward a death that itself foreshadows only uncertainty. This book is a must read for all whose faith have left them with nothing, so to speak, buttime." --Ralph Hood Editor, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion"In this unusual and powerful book, the author, a sociologist and a theologian, pursues a rich and many-layered discourse on the way time is used (and abused) in contemporary secular society. Ingeniously exploiting diverse and unlikely sources, he illustrates how public and private perceptions of time and commemoration take on diverging symbolic meaning for modern man, who is at once both the creation and the victim of the secularization process. With rareeloquence and subtlety, Fenn examines the secularizing approach to time to be found in the gospels, the Church, contemporary film and drama, to produce a work of impressive originality. Even before one has finished reading this book for the first time, one knows that one will certainly read it again."Bryan Wilson, All Souls College, Oxford
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text looks at the way in which we experience time in secular societies. It offers an exploration of our modern experience of time and shows particular interest in the idea and experience of waiting.
Long Description
In his new book, Richard Fenn looks at the way in which we experience time in a secular society. He argues that secularization is virtually synonymous with individualism. Fenn shows that the Church created the idea of individualism through its demysitification of the universe, its insistence on individual self-discipline, and its intensification of individual responsibility for the use of time. Required to take responsibility for his or her own standing in the eyes of God, the individual emerged from the protection of the Church into the full current of time. No longer protected by Providence or connected to Eternity, our lives have become radically temporal and contingent. Fenn explores the modern experience of time, as expressed in such phrases as "wasting time" and "making up for lost time." In particular, he is interested in the idea of waiting, which he believes is a defining characteristic of modern life. He also argues that the secularization of time produced anxiety about death, and shows the various strategies we have created for dealing with this anxiety. Beautifully written and thoughtfully argued, this volume raises the secularization debate to a new level of depth and sophistication.
Long Description
In this book, Richard Fenn looks at the way in which we experience time in secular societies. In Fenn's view, secularization is virtually synonymous with individualism. Although it is often the Church that decries modern individualism, he says, it is in fact the Church that created it, by its demystification of the universe, its insistence on individual self-discipline, and its intensification of individual responsibility for the use of time. The result was a profound change in the way in which time is experienced by the individual. Fenn offers a probing exploration of our modern experience of time, as expressed in such phrases as 'wasting time' and 'making up for lost time'. He is particularly interested in the idea and experience of waiting, which he believes to be a defining characteristic of modern life.
Main Description
In his new book, Richard Fenn looks at the way in which we experience time in a secular society. He argues that secularization is virtually synonymous with individualism. Fenn shows that the Church created the idea of individualism through its demysitification of the universe, its insistenceon individual self-discipline, and its intensification of individual responsibility for the use of time. Required to take responsibility for his or her own standing in the eyes of God, the individual emerged from the protection of the Church into the full current of time. No longer protected byProvidence or connected to Eternity, our lives have become radically temporal and contingent. Fenn explores the modern experience of time, as expressed in such phrases as "wasting time" and "making up for lost time." In particular, he is interested in the idea of waiting, which he believes is adefining characteristic of modern life. He also argues that the secularization of time produced anxiety about death, and shows the various strategies we have created for dealing with this anxiety. Beautifully written and thoughtfully argued, this volume raises the secularization debate to a new level of depth and sophistication.
Unpaid Annotation
In his new book, Richard Fenn looks at the way in which we experience time in a secular society. Fenn shows that the Church created the idea of individualism through its demysitification of the universe, its insistence on individual self-discipline, and its intensification of individual responsibility for the use of time. No longer protected by Providence or connected to Eternity, our lives have become radically temporal and contingent. Fenn explores the modern experience of time, as expressed in such phrases as "wasting time" and "making up for lost time". In particular, he is interested in the idea of waiting, which he believes is a defining characteristic of modern life.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction the Meaning of Secularizationp. 3
Time Will Tell the Meaning of Secularityp. 15
Secularization Reconsidered Secret, Silent Mourningp. 37
the Loss of a Temporal Matrixp. 47
Waitingp. 65
Ritual and the Consummation of Waitingp. 83
Pilgrimage to an Earthly Cityp. 101
Passing the Test of Timep. 117
Buying Time Masochism, Continuedp. 131
Notesp. 151
Bibliographyp. 157
Indexp. 161
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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