Catalogue


The diversity of life /
Edward O. Wilson.
edition
New ed.
imprint
New York : W. W. Norton, 1999.
description
xxiv, 424 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0393319407
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W. W. Norton, 1999.
isbn
0393319407
catalogue key
4133878
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Edward O. Wilson is the Pellegrino University Research Professor and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University. He is also the author of Sociobiology, the two Pulitzer Prize-winning works On Humon Nature and (with Bert Holldobler) The Ants, and the best-selling Consilience.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Natural World Book Prize, GBR, 1993 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-11-01:
This is still the best book on biodiversity. Wilson, an eminent Harvard entomologist, details the rise of biodiversity on earth and the human threats to it. His eloquent plea to save the rich variety of plant and animal life will resonate with readers of all ages and educational backgrounds. (LJ 11/1/92) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1993-09-27:
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author calls for collective initiatives to confront the deterioration of biodiversity. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
One of the most engaging and interesting books that this reviewer has seen recently. Wilson, internationally recognized as one of the leading experts in this field, leads the reader through the often-difficult subject of biodiversity. Written in a nontechnical and almost lyrical style, he explores the broad subjects of extinction, speciation, evolution, and adaptive radiation. He also treats the potential of another mass extinction caused by humankind, which may be the most serious and destructive force ever experienced by life. Wilson appeals for specific actions that can ameliorate the impending environmental crisis and that will preserve and enhance biodiversity. Richly illustrated with numerous full-color photographs, line drawings, and maps, its usefulness is further enhanced by a list of notes for each chapter and a glossary and index. Highly recommended for any student of biology or for the general reader intrigued by biodiversity, as one of the more important books written on this subject. P. E. Lutz; University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 1999
Guardian UK, April 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The classic story of how life on Earth evolved and how the diversity of the species is threatened unless whole ecosystems are rescued. Color plates.
Main Description
In this book a master scientist tells the story of how life on earth evolved. Edward O. Wilson eloquently describes how the species of the world became diverse and why that diversity is threatened today as never before. A great spasm of extinction ” the disappearance of whole species ” is occurring now, caused this time entirely by humans. Unlike the deterioration of the physical environment, which can be halted, the loss of biodiversity is a far more complex problem ” and it is irreversible. Defining a new environmental ethic, Wilson explains why we must rescue whole ecosystems, not only individual species. He calls for an end to conservation versus development arguments, and he outlines the massive shift in priorities needed to address this challenge. No writer, no scientist, is more qualified than Edward O. Wilson to describe, as he does here, the grandeur of evolution and what is at stake. "Engaging and nontechnical prose. . . . Prodigious erudition. . . . Original and fascinating insights." ” John Terborgh, New York Review of Books , front page review "Eloquent. . . . A profound and enduring contribution." ” Alan Burdick, Audubon
Main Description
In this book a master scientist tells the story of how life on earth evolved. Edward O. Wilson eloquently describes how the species of the world became diverse and why that diversity is threatened today as never before. A great spasm of extinction '” the disappearance of whole species '” is occurring now, caused this time entirely by humans. Unlike the deterioration of the physical environment, which can be halted, the loss of biodiversity is a far more complex problem '” and it is irreversible. Defining a new environmental ethic, Wilson explains why we must rescue whole ecosystems, not only individual species. He calls for an end to conservation versus development arguments, and he outlines the massive shift in priorities needed to address this challenge. No writer, no scientist, is more qualified than Edward O. Wilson to describe, as he does here, the grandeur of evolution and what is at stake. "Engaging and nontechnical prose. . . . Prodigious erudition. . . . Original and fascinating insights." '” John Terborgh, New York Review of Books , front page review "Eloquent. . . . A profound and enduring contribution." '” Alan Burdick, Audubon
Table of Contents
Foreword: Biodiversity at the Close of the Centuryp. ix
Violent Nature, Resilient Life
Storm over the Amazonp. 3
Krakataup. 16
The Great Extinctionsp. 24
Biodiversity Rising
The Fundamental Unitp. 35
New Speciesp. 51
The Forces of Evolutionp. 75
Adaptive Radiationp. 94
The Unexplored Biospherep. 131
The Creation of Ecosystemsp. 163
Biodiversity Reaches The Peakp. 183
The Human Impact
The Life and Death of Speciesp. 215
Biodiversity Threatenedp. 243
Unmined Richesp. 281
Resolutionp. 311
The Environmental Ethicp. 343
Notesp. 355
Glossaryp. 391
Acknowledgmentsp. 408
Creditsp. 411
Indexp. 413
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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