Catalogue


Russia's Muslim frontiers : new directions in cross-cultural analysis /
edited by Dale F. Eickelman.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1993.
description
ix, 206 p. : map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0253319390 (cloth : alk. paper) 0253208238 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1993.
isbn
0253319390 (cloth : alk. paper) 0253208238 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
"Originated in workshops held in Moscow and Leningrad in August 1990 and in a conference held in Hanover, N.H. and Washington, D.C. in April 1991"--Pref.
catalogue key
411362
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
"Readers will find fresh and thought-provoking studies: the differing approaches of the U.S. and the [former] Soviet Union to Middle East policy, Central Asia, and South Asia... provide grounds for self-criticism and the exploration of new directions." -- John L. Esposito ..". recommended highly for its expert analyses of political Islam." -- Journal of Third World Studies Russian, Central Asian, and American scholars appraise recent political and religious developments among Russia's Muslim neighbors.
Main Description
ÒReaders will find fresh and thought-provoking studies: the differing approaches of the U.S. and the [former] Soviet Union to Middle East policy, Central Asia, and South Asia . . . provide grounds for self-criticism and the exploration of new directions.Ó ÑJohn L. Esposito Russian, Central Asian, and American scholars candidly assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of their respective past and present approaches to understanding political and religious developments in the Muslim world. Richard W. Cottam and Georgy M. Korniyenko demonstrate that much of U.S. and Soviet conduct in the Middle East after World War II was based on reciprocal misperceptions. Martha Brill Olcott, Alexei V. Malashenko, and Abdujabar Abduvakhitov emphasize the endurance of supposedly suppressed or obliterated religious and national identities in the Central Asian nations. Victor G. Korgun and David B. Edwards offer different perspectives on the Soviet UnionÕs failed attempt to establish secular socialist rule in Afghanistan. Tribe and national identities among the Bakhtiyari and Kurds of Iran are discussed by Gene R. Garthwaite. The Islamization of Pakistan is considered by Vyacheslav Ya. Belokrenitsky, Dimitri B. Novossyolov, and Richard Kurin. Muhammad Khalid Masud calls for new directions in the cross-cultural analysis of politics and religion in Muslim states.
Table of Contents
Preface
Note on Transliteration
Introduction: The Other "Orientalist" Crisisp. 1
United States Middle East Policy in the Cold War Erap. 19
Soviet Policy in the Middle East: A Practitioner's Interpretationp. 38
Central Asia's Political Crisisp. 49
Islam versus Communism: The Experience of Coexistencep. 63
Islamic Revivalism in Uzbekistanp. 79
The Afghan Revolution: A Failed Experimentp. 101
Words in the Balance: The Poetics of Political Dissent in Afghanistanp. 114
Reimagined Internal Frontiers: Tribes and Nationalism - Bakhtiyari and Kurdsp. 130
Islam and the State in Pakistanp. 149
The Islamization of Welfare in Pakistanp. 160
Islamization in Pakistan: The Sayyid and the Dancerp. 175
Conclusion: The Limits of "Expert" Knowledgep. 190
Notes on Contributorsp. 201
Indexp. 204
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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