Catalogue


Palestine, a twice-promised land? /
Isaiah Friedman.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2000-
description
v. <1- > : maps, facsims. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
156000391X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2000-
isbn
156000391X (alk. paper)
contents note
v. 1. The British, the Arabs & Zionism, 1915-1920
catalogue key
4105668
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Isaiah Friedman is Distinguished Professor of History at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-10-01:
Friedman (Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Israel), author of The Question of Palestine, 1914-1918 (1973) and Germany, Turkey and Zionism, 1897-1918 (1977), vehemently rejects the academic consensus that during WW I Great Britain made conflicting commitments to the Arabs in the Hussein-McMahon Correspondence, to the French in the Sykes-Picot Agreement, and to the Zionists in the Balfour Declaration. Citing many primarily British sources, Friedman insists that Palestine was never promised twice and certainly not to the Arabs. That Britain had made contradictory pledges, "one to the Arabs and the other to the Jews was ... as downright false as it was absurd." This book is essentially a repetition and further development of his earlier The Question of Palestine. It adds severe critiques of Arnold Toynbee and George Antonius, who argued the theme of British duplicity, and rather unflattering portraits of Arab leaders Hussein and Faisal, who are described as ambitious and manipulative and who in any event contributed little to winning the war in the Middle East. For upper-division undergraduate through research collections. ; Occidental College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Friedman (Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Israel), author of The Question of Palestine, 1914-1918 (1973) and Germany, Turkey and Zionism, 1897-1918 (1977), vehemently rejects the academic consensus that during WW I Great Britain made conflicting commitments to the Arabs in the Hussein-McMahon Correspondence, to the French in the Sykes-Picot Agreement, and to the Zionists in the Balfour Declaration. Citing many primarily British sources, Friedman insists that Palestine was never promised twice and certainly not to the Arabs. That Britain had made contradictory pledges, "one to the Arabs and the other to the Jews was ... as downright false as it was absurd." This book... adds severe critiques of Arnold Toynbee and George Antonius, who argued the theme of British duplicity, and rather unflattering portraits of Arab leaders Hussein and Faisal, who are described as ambitious and manipulative and who in any event contributed little to winning the war in the Middle East. For upper-division undergraduate through research collections." --B. Harris Jr., Choice "Palestine: A Twice Promised Land? Is a work of impeccable and diligent scholarship. With admirable detachment and respect for detail, Isaiah Friedman confronts and analyzes the large political issues of the First World War and its aftermath in Palestine....This is a book that deserves to be widely read and will be indispensable to anyone working on the creation of the Palestine mandate." --William Roger Louis, President, American Historical Association "This is an extraordinary book on a vital topic that is still a matter of debate some 57 years after the State of Israel was established in 1948. One might justly ask: what difference does it make today whether Palestine in 1917-18 was, or was not, twice promised, when the fact of Israel's existence is incontrovertible? Yet, as recently as 2003 a group of Palestinian Arabs demanded that the British government apologize for the issuance of the Balfour Declaration in November 1917. Friedman's book amounts to a complete discrediting of the Antonius thesis, which was subsequently adopted by Toynbee and other former British Colonial officers and diplomats. This thesis formed the basis for the 'twice-promised land'myth that Friedman so successfully refutes." --Shlomo Slonim, Israel Affairs
"Friedman (Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Israel), author of The Question of Palestine, 1914-1918 (1973) and Germany, Turkey and Zionism, 1897-1918 (1977), vehemently rejects the academic consensus that during WW I Great Britain made conflicting commitments to the Arabs in the Hussein-McMahon Correspondence, to the French in the Sykes-Picot Agreement, and to the Zionists in the Balfour Declaration. Citing many primarily British sources, Friedman insists that Palestine was never promised twice and certainly not to the Arabs. That Britain had made contradictory pledges, "one to the Arabs and the other to the Jews was ... as downright false as it was absurd." This book… adds severe critiques of Arnold Toynbee and George Antonius, who argued the theme of British duplicity, and rather unflattering portraits of Arab leaders Hussein and Faisal, who are described as ambitious and manipulative and who in any event contributed little to winning the war in the Middle East. For upper-division undergraduate through research collections." -B. Harris Jr., Choice "Palestine: A Twice Promised Land? Is a work of impeccable and diligent scholarship. With admirable detachment and respect for detail, Isaiah Friedman confronts and analyzes the large political issues of the First World War and its aftermath in Palestine....This is a book that deserves to be widely read and will be indispensable to anyone working on the creation of the Palestine mandate." -William Roger Louis, President, American Historical Association "This is an extraordinary book on a vital topic that is still a matter of debate some 57 years after the State of Israel was established in 1948. One might justly ask: what difference does it make today whether Palestine in 1917-18 was, or was not, twice promised, when the fact of Israel's existence is incontrovertible? Yet, as recently as 2003 a group of Palestinian Arabs demanded that the British government apologize for the issuance of the Balfour Declaration in November 1917. Friedman's book amounts to a complete discrediting of the Antonius thesis, which was subsequently adopted by Toynbee and other former British Colonial officers and diplomats. This thesis formed the basis for the 'twice-promised land'myth that Friedman so successfully refutes." -Shlomo Slonim, Israel Affairs
"Palestine: A Twice Promised Land? Is a work of impeccable and diligent scholarship. With admirable detachment and respect for detail, Isaiah Friedman confronts and analyzes the large political issues of the First World War and its aftermath in Palestine....This is a book that deserves to be widely read and will be indispensable to anyone working on the creation of the Palestine mandate." -William Roger Louis, President, American Historical Association "This is an extraordinary book on a vital topic that is still a matter of debate some 57 years after the State of Israel was established in 1948. One might justly ask: what difference does it make today whether Palestine in 1917-18 was, or was not, twice promised, when the fact of Israel's existence is incontrovertible? Yet, as recently as 2003 a group of Palestinian Arabs demanded that the British government apologize for the issuance of the Balfour Declaration in November 1917. Friedman's book amounts to a complete discrediting of the Antonius thesis, which was subsequently adopted by Toynbee and other former British Colonial officers and diplomats. This thesis formed the basis for the 'twice-promised land' myth that Friedman so successfully refutes." --Shlomo Slonim, Israel Affairs
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
In this book, Isaiah Friedman examinesone of the most complex problems that bedeviled Middle East politics in the interwar period, onethat still remains controversial. The prevailing view is that during World War I the Britishgovernment made conflicting commitments to the Arabs, to the French, and to the Jews. Through arigorous examination of the documentary evidence, Friedman demolishes the myth that Palestinewas a "twice-promised land" and shows that the charges of fraudulenceand deception leveled against the British are groundless. Central to Arab claims on Palestine was a letter dated24 October 1915, from Sir Henry McMahon, the British High Commissioner in Egypt, to KingHussein, the Sharif of Mecca, pledging Arab independence. Friedman shows that this letter wasconditional on a general Arab uprising against the Turks. Predicated on reciprocal action, theletter committed the British to recognie and uphold Arab independence in the areas of theFertile Crescent once it was liberated by the Arabs themselves. As all evidence shows, fewtribes rebelled against the Turks. The Arabs in Palestine, Syria, and Mesopotamia fought for theOttoman Empire against the British. In addition to its non-binding nature, McMahon'sletter has been misinterpreted with respect to the territories it covers. Friedman'sarchival discovery of the Arabic version actually read by Hussein indisputably shows thatPalestine was not included in the British pledge. Indeed, Hussein welcomed the return of theJews just as his son Emir Feisal believed that Arab-Jewish cooperation would be a means to buildArab independence without the interference of the European powers.Myth-shattering and meticulously documented,Palestine: A Twice-Promised Land? is revisionist history in the truest sense of theword.
Main Description
In this book, Isaiah Friedman examines one of the most complex problems that bedeviled Middle East politics in the interwar period, one that still remains controversial. The prevailing view is that during World War I the British government made conflicting commitments to the Arabs, to the French, and to the Jews. Through a rigorous examination of the documentary evidence, Friedman demolishes the myth that Palestine was a "twice-promised land" and shows that the charges of fraudulence and deception leveled against the British are groundless. Central to Arab claims on Palestine was a letter dated 24 October 1915, from Sir Henry McMahon, the British High Commissioner in Egypt, to King Hussein, the Sharif of Mecca, pledging Arab independence. Friedman shows that this letter was conditional on a general Arab uprising against the Turks. Predicated on reciprocal action, the letter committed the British to recognize and uphold Arab independence in the areas of the Fertile Crescent once it was liberated by the Arabs themselves. As all evidence shows, few tribes rebelled against the Turks. The Arabs in Palestine, Syria, and Mesopotamia fought for the Ottoman Empire against the British. In addition to its non-binding nature, McMahon's letter has been misinterpreted with respect to the territories it covers. Friedman's archival discovery of the Arabic version actually read by Hussein indisputably shows that Palestine was not included in the British pledge. Indeed, Hussein welcomed the return of the Jews just as his son Emir Feisal believed that Arab-Jewish cooperation would be a means to build Arab independence without the interference of the European powers. Myth-shattering and meticulously documented, Palestine: A Twice-Promised Land? is revisionist history in the truest sense of the word.
Main Description
In this comprehensive two-volume study, Isaiah Friedman examines one of the most complex problems that bedeviled Middle East politics in the
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Preamblep. xix
Mapsp. lxix
A Follow-up to the Dialogue with Arnold J. Toynbeep. 1
The "Pledge" to Hussein and the Sykes-Picot Agreementp. 47
Toynbee versus Toynbeep. 61
Pro-Arab or Pro-Zionist?p. 101
Sykes, Picot, and Husseinp. 123
A Fatal Misunderstandingp. 145
The Sharifians, Palestinians, and the Zionistsp. 165
The Declaration to the Seven and Lawrence's "Capture" of Damascusp. 195
The Weizmann-Feisal Agreement and Afterp. 217
The King-Crane Commission and the Unmaking of the Weizmann-Feisal Agreementp. 239
Notesp. 283
Appendicesp. 365
Indexp. 377
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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