Catalogue


Public-sector labour relations in an era of restraint and restructuring /
edited by Gene Swimmer.
imprint
Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
232 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0195415914 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0195415914 :
contents note
Public-sector labour relations in an era of restraint and restructuring: an overview / Gene Swimmer -- Provincial government restructuring in Nova Scotia: the freezing and thawing of labour relations / Terry H. Wagar -- From softball to hardball: the transition in labour-management relations in the Ontario Public Service / Jospeh B. Rose -- Fiscal restraint, legislated concessions, and labour relations in the Manitoba civil service, 1988-1997 / Paul Phillips and Carolina Stecher -- The logic of union quiescence: the Alberta case / Yonatan Reshef -- Labour relations in the BC public service: blowing in the political wind / Mark Thompson -- Restructuring federal public-sector human resources / Gene Swimmer and Sandra Bach -- Public employment relations: Canadian developments in perspective / Roy J. Adams.
local note
SCAR copy purchased by the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Library for the MIRHR Program, Scarborough Campus, University of Toronto.
catalogue key
4103504
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides case studies of public service labour relations in Canada in the 1990s. They demonstrate that governments have adopted the policy that they may engage in bargaining or suspend it whenever they find it convenient.
Main Description
The 1990s in Canada will probably go down as the most stressful decade for public-sector industrial relations since the inception, 25 years earlier, of collective bargaining in the public service. Government debt and defecits became the rationale for downsizing, outsourcing, privatization,layoffs, buyouts, and early retirement packages at both the federal and provincial levels. When workers' bargaining units did not bend to government demands at the negotating table, and when leaders did not blink at the threat of restrictive legislation, then governments of both the right and theleft at times found it convenient to legislate rule changes to suit their fiscal or ideological purposes. The contributors to Public-Sector Labour Relations examine in depth the events of recent years in the public service of six jurisdictions--Nova Scotia, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, and the federal government. Trends in the other five Canadian provinces are also considered. Only inBC has there been an essentially co-operative labour relations environment, although even in this province, public service employment has dropped considerably. Overall, from 1991 to 1997, provincial civil service employment fell by 15 per cent, while the federal employment reduction was 14 per cent.(From the employment peak in 1993-4, the overall provincial reduction was over 22 per cent.) Although collective bargaining is still alive, a major conclusion of this study is that collective bargaining in the Canadian public sector is not well. The cases reported here demonstrate that governments have adopted the attitude and policy that they may engage in bargaining or suspend itwhenever they find that course of action to be convenient. Viewed from a broader international context, as discussed in the concluding chapter, the casual suspension of bargaining by Canadian governments cannot be justified by the norms and agreements that Canada has shared with the internationalcommunity.
Long Description
The 1990s in Canada was arguably the most stressful decade for public-sector industrial relations since the inception, 25 years earlier, of collective bargaining in the public service. This book examines in depth the events of recent years in the public service of six jurisdictions--Nova Scotia, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, and the federal government--along with trends in the other five Canadian provinces.
Main Description
The 1990s in Canada will probably go down as the most stressful decade for public-sector industrial relations since the inception, 25 years earlier, of collective bargaining in the public service. Government debt and defecits became the rationale for downsizing, outsourcing, privatization,layoffs, buyouts, and early retirement packages at both the federal and provincial levels. When workers' bargaining units did not bend to government demands at the negotating table, and when leaders did not blink at the threat of restrictive legislation, then governments of both the right and theleft at times found it convenient to legislate rule changes to suit their fiscal or ideological purposes.The contributors to Public-Sector Labour Relations examine in depth the events of recent years in the public service of six jurisdictions--Nova Scotia, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, and the federal government. Trends in the other five Canadian provinces are also considered. Only inBC has there been an essentially co-operative labour relations environment, although even in this province, public service employment has dropped considerably. Overall, from 1991 to 1997, provincial civil service employment fell by 15 per cent, while the federal employment reduction was 14 per cent.(From the employment peak in 1993-4, the overall provincial reduction was over 22 per cent.)Although collective bargaining is still alive, a major conclusion of this study is that collective bargaining in the Canadian public sector is not well. The cases reported here demonstrate that governments have adopted the attitude and policy that they may engage in bargaining or suspend it wheneverthey find that course of action to be convenient. Viewed from a broader international context, as discussed in the concluding chapter, the casual suspension of bargaining by Canadian governments cannot be justified by the norms and agreements that Canada has shared with the internationalcommunity.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Public-Sector Labour Relations in an Era of Restraint and Restructuring: An Overview
Provincial Government Restructuring in Nova Scotia: The Freezing and Thawing of Labour Relations
From Softball to Hardball: The Transition in Labour-Management Relations in the Ontario Public Service
Fiscal Restraint, Legislated Concessions, and Labour Relations in the Manitoba Civil Service, 1988-1997
The Logic of Union Quiescence: The Alberta Case
Labour Relations in the BC Public Service: Blowing in the Political Wind
Restructuring Federal Public-Sector Human Resources
Public Employment Relations: Canadian Developments in Perspective
Contributors
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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