Catalogue


American libraries before 1876 /
Haynes McMullen ; foreword by Kenneth E. Carpenter.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000.
description
xiv, 179 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
031331277X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000.
isbn
031331277X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4071378
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-174) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Haynes McMullen is Emeritus Professor of Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThis book is the capstone of a distinguished career in librarianship.'' Virginia Libraries
"This book is the capstone of a distinguished career in librarianship."- Virginia Libraries
"The book clearly involved enormous effort, the painstaking collection of data, and an undeniable joy in discovery. The chapter notes attest to the author's familiarity with historical scholarship in numerous fields, not the least of which is library history."- College & Research Libraries
'œMcMullen's work is a major resource for historians as they develop their understanding of the emergence of libraries and a print culture in the Colonial and early American periods. It also allows librarians to gain a unique regional perspective on this nascent period of American librarianship.'' ARBA
"McMullen's work is a major resource for historians as they develop their understanding of the emergence of libraries and a print culture in the Colonial and early American periods. It also allows librarians to gain a unique regional perspective on this nascent period of American librarianship."- ARBA
"By reading American Libraries before 1876, one learns about asylum libraries, bray libraries, proprietary libraries, society libraries and tavern reading rooms. The differences in a "ladies' social library" and a "ladies' society library" are also examined. These are just a few of the types of libraries that are covered in this important volume. A must read for anyone interested in the history of libraries!"- Public Library Quarterly
'œBy reading American Libraries before 1876, one learns about asylum libraries, bray libraries, proprietary libraries, society libraries and tavern reading rooms. The differences in a "ladies' social library" and a "ladies' society library" are also examined. These are just a few of the types of libraries that are covered in this important volume. A must read for anyone interested in the history of libraries!'' Public Library Quarterly
'œThe book clearly involved enormous effort, the painstaking collection of data, and an undeniable joy in discovery. The chapter notes attest to the author's familiarity with historical scholarship in numerous fields, not the least of which is library history.'' College & Research Libraries
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Gives an account of the birth, life, and occasional death of 10,000 library collections and traces relationships between the presence of libraries and other aspects of American life.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of the founding of American libraries from the earliest colonial times to 1875. It gives an account of the birth, life, and sometimes death of 10,000 early American library collections.
Long Description
1876 is considered to mark the beginning of the modern library movement in the United States, but Americans created and used thousands of libraries before that date. While the history of American libraries has not been neglected by scholars, none has examined in detail where in the different parts of the country various libraries came into existence over any extended period of time. The present work does that, detailing the kinds of libraries that existed before 1876 and including 80 to 85 kinds, depending on the way the collections are classified.
Long Description
Gives an account of the birth, life, and occasional death of 10,000 early American library collections and traces relationships between the presence of libraries and other aspects of American life. 1876 is considered to mark the beginning of the modern library movement in the United States, but Americans created and used thousands of libraries before that date. While the history of American libraries has not been neglected by scholars, none has examined in detail where in the different parts of the country various libraries came into existence over any extended period of time. The present work does that, detailing the kinds of libraries that existed before 1876 and including 80 to 85 kinds, depending on the way the collections are classified.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. vii
Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Libraries in the Colonial and Revolutionary Periodsp. 15
Libraries from the End of the Revolutionary Period through 1875p. 33
Kinds of Libraries in Existence before 1876p. 57
Social Librariesp. 63
Libraries Belonging to Organizations That Were Not Formed to Establish Librariesp. 81
Libraries Belonging to Institutions, Some of Which Were Operated by Private Organizations and Some of Which Were Operated by Governmental Unitsp. 103
Libraries Belonging to Governmental Agenciesp. 121
Libraries Belonging to Business Firms and Individualsp. 137
Libraries of Uncertain Ownershipp. 143
Subject Matter of the Collectionsp. 147
Private Libraries, School Libraries, and Sunday School Librariesp. 155
Afterwordp. 161
Glossaryp. 163
Selected Bibliographyp. 173
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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