Catalogue

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Breakdown, breakup, breakthrough : Germany's difficult passage to modernity /
edited by Carl Lankowski.
imprint
New York : Berghahn Books, 1999.
description
xix, 233 p.
ISBN
1571812113 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Berghahn Books, 1999.
isbn
1571812113 (alk. paper)
general note
A festschrift for Andrei Markovits.
catalogue key
4049313
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher S. Allen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Georgia. Patricia Davis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Notre Dame. Karen Donfried is a Specialist in European Affairs in the Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division of the Congressional Research Service. Thomas Ertman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University. Philip S. Gorski is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Carolyn Hofig received her doctorate from the Department of History of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Michael G. Huelshoff is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of New Orleans. Carl Lankowski is the Research Director at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies in Washington, D.C. Beth Simone Noveck is Director of International Programs of the Yale Law School Information Society Project and practices information technologies and media law at Duane, Morris and Heckscher LLP. Simon Reich is a Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh. Jeremiah M. Riemer is currently a freelance translator in Washington, and has taught at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Boston University, and Oberlin College. Stephen J. Silvia is an Associate Professor at the School of International Service, American University, Washington, D.C.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
Germany's institutional anatomy, its norms, and the spirits that animate it can only be properly understood if one takes into account such factors as its economic power and central position within Europe. This volume traces the difficult passage of German society to modernity, offering new perspectives on the "German question", largely characterized by the absence of key ideological underpinnings of democracy in the early modern period and a constitutional exceptionalism on the eve of the 20th century.
Main Description
Germany's institutional anatomy, its norms, and the spirits that animate it can only be properly understood if one takes into account such factors as its economic power and central position within Europe. This volume traces the difficult passage of German society to modernity, offering new perspectives on the "German question," largely characterized by the absence of key ideological underpinnings of democracy in the early modern period and a constitutional exceptionalism on the eve of the 20th century. The essays describe the organizational infrastructure and behavioral norms that account for the success of Germany's postwar economy and polity, but also register the tensions between the increasingly individualist outlook of post-1968 Germans and the country's highly organized and ritualistic decision-making structures, which often severely test the democratic foundations of the republic. However, Germany is not unique in its efforts to find a balance between traditional and modern forces that have shaped its history. This volume demonstrates that Germany's experience, past and present, teaches broader lessons that speak to the central concerns of our time: what are the historical precursors of and vital attitudes towards democracy? How much structural variation will be feasible in political economies embedded in Europe after the introduction of the Euro and in the context of economic and other globalization? The considerable insights into these questions provided by this volume celebrate the inspiration given to colleagues and students who have worked with Andrei S. Markovits, to whom it is dedicated. Carl Lankowski is Coordinator of European Area Studies at the Foreign Services Institute, Arlington, Virginia.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. ix
Calvinism and Democracy: The Case of the Dutch Republic (1555-1787)p. 1
Liberalization and Democratization in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Germany in Comparative Perspectivep. 34
Germany on the Global Stage: The U.S.-German Relationship after Unificationp. 51
The Politics of Adapting Organized Capitalism: United Germany, the New Europe, and Globalizationp. 77
The "Storm before the Calm": Labor Markets, Unemployment, and Standort Deutschlandp. 95
The Bundesrat, Interest Groups, and Gridlock: German Federalism at the End of the Twentieth Centuryp. 121
Fahrvergnugen on the Datenbahn: Germany Confronts the Information Agep. 137
Engineered Like No Other: German Society and the Automobilep. 155
Globalization, Gender, and the German Welfare State: The Maldistributive Consequences of Retrenchmentp. 175
Grace? Under Pressure? The Goldhagen Controversy after Two Yearsp. 212
List of Contributorsp. 227
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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