Catalogue

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Daily life in colonial Mexico : the journey of Friar Ilarione da Bergamo, 1761-1768 /
translated from the Italian by Williams J. Orr ; edited by Robert Ryal Miller and William J. Orr.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2000.
description
x, 240 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0806132345 (hc : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2000.
isbn
0806132345 (hc : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4030626
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
Recently discovered after nearly 200 years in private possession, this brief account of an Italian Capuchin's journey to and residence in New Spain yields a variety of information on daily life in the Bourbon colony. Fra Ilarione da Bergamo came to the wealthy viceroyalty to collect donations for the Church's missionary efforts in faraway Tibet. He spent time in Mexico City and Guadalajara and resided for nearly four years in the mining town of Real del Monte before he was expelled with the foreign clergy in 1768. Fra Ilarione's account of his travels furnishes insights on a number of subjects. The first and last sections of the work chronicle the rigors and dangers of travel by sea and land in the mid-18th century. The core of the memoir discusses topics such as Mexican urban life, food, amusements, medicine, natural disasters, religious practices, and mining. His descriptions of local curiosities like cockfights and Holy Week celebrations are especially interesting. More than a dozen of Fra Ilarione's original drawings, including maps and sketches of Mexican flora, are included. For all libraries. V. H. Cummins; Austin College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Historians, university students, and general readers will find in the book numerous nuggets to add to their knowledge of social and economic conditions in New Spain at the beginning of the reforms of Charles III."- Mark A. Burkholder , co-author of Colonial Latin America
“Historians, university students, and general readers will find in the book numerous nuggets to add to their knowledge of social and economic conditions in New Spain at the beginning of the reforms of Charles III.”- Mark A. Burkholder , co-author of Colonial Latin America
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In 1761 Ilarione da Bergamo, a Capuchin friar, journeyed to Mexico to gather alms for foreign missions. After harrowing voyages across the Mediterranean and Atlantic, he reached Mexico City in 1763. His account reveals the squalor, crime, and other perils in the viceregal capital, and details daily life: food, public hygiene, sexual morality, medical practices, and popular diversions. His observations about religious life are particularly valuable. Ilarione also describes mining and refining techniques, recounts a bitter and bloody miners' strike, and recalls traveling across bandit-infested wilderness to Guadalajara. After his return to Italy, Ilarione wrote an account of his journey, published here for the first time in English. The editors have liberally annotated the text, written an introduction about Ilarione's life and the historical context of his journey, and included more than a dozen of Fra Ilarione's original drawings, including maps and sketches of Mexican flora. Daily Life in Colonial Mexico is a welcome addition to the firsthand literature of New Spain.
Main Description
In 1761 Ilarione da Bergamo, a Capuchin friar, journeyed to Mexico to gather alms for foreign missions. After harrowing voyages across the Mediterranean and Atlantic, he reached Mexico City in 1763. His account reveals the squalor, crime, and other perils in the viceregal capital, and details daily life: food, public hygiene, sexual morality, medical practices, and popular diversions. His observations about religious life are particularly valuable. Ilarione also describes mining and refining techniques, recounts a bitter and bloody miners’ strike, and recalls traveling across bandit-infested wilderness to Guadalajara. After his return to Italy, Ilarione wrote an account of his journey, published here for the first time in English. The editors have liberally annotated the text, written an introduction about Ilarione’s life and the historical context of his journey, and included more than a dozen of Fra Ilarione’s original drawings, including maps and sketches of Mexican flora. Daily Life in Colonial Mexico is a welcome addition to the firsthand literature of New Spain.
Unpaid Annotation
In 1761 Ilarione da Bergamo, a Capuchin friar, journeyed to Mexico to gather alms for foreign missions. After harrowing voyages across the Mediterranean and Atlantic, he reached Mexico City in 1763. Ilarione's account reveals the squalor, crime, and other perils in the viceregal capital, and gives details about daily life: food, public hygiene, sexual morality, medical practices, and popular diversions. His observations about religious life are particularly valuable. Based on a four year residence in the silver mining town of Real del Monte, fifty miles north of the capital, Ilarione describes mining and refining techniques and recounts a bitter and bloody miners' strike. Ilarione also traveled across bandit-infested wilderness to Guadalajara.After his return to Italy, Ilarione wrote an account of his journey, published here for the first time in English. The editors have liberally annotated the text and written an introduction about Ilarione's life and the historical context of his journey. Daily Life in Colonial Mexico is a welcome addition to the firsthand literature of New Spain.

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