Catalogue


Romantic dialogues : Anglo-American continuities, 1776-1862 /
Richard Gravil.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, 2000.
description
xx, 250 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0312227167 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, 2000.
isbn
0312227167 (cloth)
catalogue key
4030030
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard Gravil is Reader in Literary Studies at the College of St. Mark and St. John, Plymouth, and has previously taught at the University of Victoria, BC. and the University of Lodz, Poland.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-02-01:
Lamenting a "divided profession"--i.e., the understanding of English literature and American literature as separate traditions--Gravil (College of St. Mark and St. John, UK, and managing editor of Symbiosis: A Journal of Anglo-American Literary Relations, 1997- ) proposes that US Romanticists' work be understood as "a sustained effort to restate Romanticism in American terms, redeemed from the tentativeness, the doubt, the indirections, the failures and the compromises, of their English precursors." The author develops the "eager intertextuality" of Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson, on the one hand, with their English contemporaries and predecessors--Burke, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, and Shelley foremost among them. Gravil writes stately prose that is heavy in quotation from primary sources and heavy in annotation; but he demonstrates a puckish undertone and even some of the notes sparkle with irony. This volume joins Robert Weisbuch's Atlantic Double-Cross: American Literature and British Influence in the Age of Emerson (CH, May'87), which Gravil acknowledges "will long remain the first recourse of anyone interested in transatlantic dialogue in this period." Taking fewer writers than Weisbuch, though, and treating them at greater length, Gravil provides new historical readings of the most important US writers. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. E. Gibbons; Our Lady of the Lake University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a welcome and lively addition to and engagement with Robert Weisbuch's influential Atlantic Double-Cross..."--Bryan Waterman, The Wordsworth Circle "...there are many fresh perceptions here about the complex interconnections of British and American Romanticism." European Romantic Review "In Romantic Dialogues Richard Gravil carries his learning lightly, thinks deeply and writies invitingly...a major study." Symbiosis "Learned, rigorous in testing its assertions, mordant and spirited in its expression, Romantic Dialogues makes an important claim...."--Robert Weisbuch, New England Quarterly "Gravil's deft and learned application of key texts...powerfully challenge the easy presumption of an autochtonous American writing."--Kurt Eisen, American Literature "Romantic Dialogues is a significant contribution that is certain to provoke ongoing dialogue of its own."--Kenneth M. Price, Romantic Circles Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
Richard Gravil explores the relationship between works of the "American Renaissance," in particular the works of the Transcendentalists, and British Romanticism, emphasizing the significance of the American Revolution to British writers and the role of Fenimore Cooper in the foundation of American literature. He focuses on the reception of Wordsworth and Coleridge by Emerson and Thoreau, Melville's reading of Coleridge and Whitman's transfiguration of Wordsworth, the response ofHawthorne and Poe to Coleridge and Keats, and the exceptional intertextuality of Emily Dickinson.
Description for Bookstore
Richard Gravil explores the relationship between works of the "American Renaissance," in particular the works of the Transcendentalists, and British Romanticism, emphasizing the significance of the American Revolution to British writers and the role of Fenimore Cooper in the foundation of American literature. He focuses on the reception of Wordsworth and Coleridge by Emerson and Thoreau, Melville's reading of Coleridge and Whitman's transfiguration of Wordsworth, the response of Hawthorne and Poe to Coleridge and Keats, and the exceptional intertextuality of Emily Dickinson.
Table of Contents
Permissionsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Revolution and Independence, 1776-1837
The Anglo-American Revolutionp. 3
Romantic Americasp. 23
Consanguinity and In(ter)dependencep. 47
Redeeming the Promise of England, 1823-1862
James Fenimore Cooper and the Specter of Edmund Burkep. 69
Nature and Walden: Visionary Gleamsp. 91
Romancing Romanticism: Hawthorne and Poep. 117
The Whale and the Albatross: Melville's Active Universep. 139
Discharged Soldiers and Runaway Slavesp. 163
Emily Dickinson's Imaginary Conversationsp. 187
Excursus Note: The War of 1820; or, Colonel Gardner's Campaignp. 209
Notesp. 213
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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