Catalogue


No God but God : Egypt and the triumph of Islam /
Geneive Abdo.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xi, 223 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195125401 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0195125401 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4029805
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2000-10-01:
In focusing upon the extremes of Islam, the Western media have generally overlooked the peaceful religious changes that have recently, and gradually, taken place in Egypt. On all levels of society, many Egyptians have come to reject Islamic groups that resort to violence. These people realize that religious values and spiritual ideals can be adapted to peacefully and thus co-exist with the demands of contemporary life. Abdo, a correspondent for the Guardian and the Economist, conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segments of society "to present the true face of Islam." Along the way, she discovered a great diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses a greater challenge to Western interests than the militant movement now in decline. Partially funded by the United States Institute for Peace, this firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reform in the 21st century. Recommended for public and academic libraries.DMichael W. Ellis, Ellenville P.L., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Abdo...conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segments of society 'to present the true face of Islam.' Along the way, she discovered a great diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses a greater challenge to Western interests than the militarymovement now in decline.... This firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reform in the 21st century."--Library Journal
"Abdo...conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segmentsof society 'to present the true face of Islam.' Along the way, she discovered agreat diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses agreater challenge to Western interests than the military movement now indecline.... This firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reformin the 21st century."--Library Journal
"A fascinating look at an Islamic subculture mostly unknown to the Western non-Muslim. Abdo presents fruitful cross-cultural undercurrents that provide hope for peace and understanding between secularism and religion." --Booklist
"A fascinating look at an Islamic subculture mostly unknown to the Westernnon-Muslim. Abdo presents fruitful cross-cultural undercurrents that providehope for peace and understanding between secularism and religion."--Booklist
"As Abdo effectively points out in this important work, regardless of significant Western cultural influence and a relatively secular and firm Egyptian government, the grassroots Islamic revival taking shape in Egypt is indeed a serious and thriving force."--Middle East Insight
"As Abdo effectively points out in this important work, regardless ofsignificant Western cultural influence and a relatively secular and firmEgyptian government, the grassroots Islamic revival taking shape in Egypt isindeed a serious and thriving force."--Middle East Insight
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movement with clarity and insight...(She) has a firm grasp of the history of which she writes and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and a sensitive analyst."--The Washington Post Book World
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movementwith clarity and insight...(She) has a firm grasp of the history of which shewrites and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and asensitive analyst."--The Washington Post Book World
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movement with clarity and insight....(She) has a firm grasp of the history of which she writes and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and a sensitive analyst."--The Washington Post Book World
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movement with clarity and insight.... [She] has a firm grasp of the history of which she writes and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and a sensitive analyst."-- The Washington Post Book World "A fascinating look at an Islamic subculture mostly unknown to the Western non-Muslim. Abdo presents fruitful cross-cultural undercurrents that provide hope for peace and understanding between secularism and religion." -- Booklist "Abdo...conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segments of society 'to present the true face of Islam.' Along the way, she discovered a great diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses a greater challenge to Western interests than the military movement now in decline.... This firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reform in the 21st century."-- Library Journal "Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social or political activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it as monodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary. No God But God debunks these one-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering an incisive, fresh, and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but a congenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking to redefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects are groping for meaning, and recreating themselves in the process, the same may not be said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the image of an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoire of tactics." --Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, Harvard University "Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics of Egyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation with an engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today and tomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long and in-depth experience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that are often inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity that cannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of the pitfalls to which others succumb." --John L. Esposito Director, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movement with clarity and insight.... [She] has a firm grasp of the history of which she writes and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and a sensitive analyst."--The Washington Post Book World "A fascinating look at an Islamic subculture mostly unknown to the Western non-Muslim. Abdo presents fruitful cross-cultural undercurrents that provide hope for peace and understanding between secularism and religion." --Booklist "Abdo...conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segments of society 'to present the true face of Islam.' Along the way, she discovered a great diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses a greater challenge to Western interests than the military movement now in decline.... This firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reform in the 21st century."--Library Journal "Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social or political activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it as monodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary.No God But Goddebunks these one-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering an incisive, fresh, and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but a congenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking to redefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects are groping for meaning, and recreating themselves in the process, the same may not be said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the image of an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoire of tactics." --Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, Harvard University "Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics of Egyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation with an engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today and tomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long and in-depth experience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that are often inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity that cannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of the pitfalls to which others succumb." --John L. Esposito Director, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University
"Geneive Abdo chronicles Egypt's contemporary moderate Islamist movement with clarity and insight.... [She] has a firm grasp of the history of which she writes and an obvious empathy for her subjects. She is a fine journalist and a sensitive analyst."--The Washington Post Book World "A fascinating look at an Islamic subculture mostly unknown to the Western non-Muslim. Abdo presents fruitful cross-cultural undercurrents that provide hope for peace and understanding between secularism and religion." --Booklist "Abdo...conducted hundreds of interviews within previously closed segments of society 'to present the true face of Islam.' Along the way, she discovered a great diversity of religious expression in a social transformation that poses a greater challenge to Western interests than the military movement now in decline.... This firsthand account will serve as a role model for Islamic reform in the 21st century."--Library Journal "Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social or political activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it as monodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary. No God But God debunks these one-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering an incisive, fresh, and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but a congenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking to redefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects are groping for meaning, and recreating themselves in the process, the same may not be said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the image of an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoire of tactics." --Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, Harvard University "Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics of Egyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation with an engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today and tomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long and in-depth experience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that are often inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity that cannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of the pitfalls to which others succumb." --John L. Esposito Director, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University "The fate of Egypt, the core country of the Arab world, may be decisive for the future of the Middle East and the Muslim world. In this original and perceptive book, enriched by first-hand acquaintance with the country and with its Islamic opposition, Geneive Abdo gives us a portrait of Egypt's religious establishment and opposition, and explores the thinking that seeks to reshape Egyptian culture, law and society along authoritarian Muslim lines. Focusing on the protracted conflict between military government and illiberal opposition, Abdo portrays a society in which the religious opposition is, while avoiding a direct challenge, transforming the state and society around it. The wide support for this movement among the middle class as well as the poor, and the often suspicious and rancorous politics it espouses, produce a disturbing picture of Egypt today. -- Fred Halliday, author of Nation and Religion in the Middle East and Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics
"Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics of Egyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation with an engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today and tomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long andin-depth experience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that are often inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity that cannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of the pitfalls to which others succumb." --John L. EspositoDirector, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University
"Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics ofEgyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation withan engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today andtomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long and in-depthexperience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that areoften inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity thatcannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of thepitfalls to which others succumb." --John L. Esposito Director, Center forMuslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University
"Geneive Abdo has produced a remarkable volume. She makes the dynamics of Egyptian society come alive. Combining sound scholarship and observation with an engaging style, readers will be given an insight into Egypt today and tomorrow that cannot be found elsewhere. The author's long andin-depth experience in Egypt, particularly her access to sectors of society that are often inaccessible to outsiders, gives this volume a depth and authenticity that cannot be found elsewhere. It is also the reason why she avoids so many of the pitfalls to which others succumb."--John L. Esposito,Director, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding Georgetown University
"The fate of Egypt, the core country of the Arab world, may be decisive for the future of the Middle East and the Muslim world. In this original and perceptive book, enriched by first-hand acquaintance with the country and with its Islamic opposition, Geneive Abdo gives us a portrait ofEgypt's religious establishment and opposition, and explores the thinking that seeks to reshape Egyptian culture, law and society along authoritarian Muslim lines. Focusing on the protracted conflict between military government and illiberal opposition, Abdo portrays a society in which thereligious opposition is, while avoiding a direct challenge, transforming the state and society around it. The wide support for this movement among the middle class as well as the poor, and the often suspicious and rancorous politics it espouses, produce a disturbing picture of Egypt today. -- FredHalliday, author of Nation and Religion in the Middle East and Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics
"The fate of Egypt, the core country of the Arab world, may be decisivefor the future of the Middle East and the Muslim world. In this original andperceptive book, enriched by first-hand acquaintance with the country and withits Islamic opposition, Geneive Abdo gives us a portrait of Egypt's religiousestablishment and opposition, and explores the thinking that seeks to reshapeEgyptian culture, law and society along authoritarian Muslim lines. Focusing onthe protracted conflict between military government and illiberal opposition,Abdo portrays a society in which the religious opposition is, while avoiding adirect challenge, transforming the state and society around it. The wide supportfor this movement among the middle class as well as the poor, and the oftensuspicious and rancorous politics it espouses, produce a disturbing picture ofEgypt today. -- Fred Halliday, author of Nation and Religion in the Middle Eastand Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics
"The fate of Egypt, the core country of the Arab world, may be decisive for the future of the Middle East and the Muslim world. In this original and perceptive book, enriched by first-hand acquaintance with the country and with its Islamic opposition, Geneive Abdo gives us a portrait ofEgypt's religious establishment and opposition, and explores the thinking that seeks to reshape Egyptian culture, law and society along authoritarian Muslim lines. Focusing on the protracted conflict between military government and illiberal opposition, Abdo portrays a society in which thereligious opposition is, while avoiding a direct challenge, transforming the state and society around it. The wide support for this movement among the middle class as well as the poor, and the often suspicious and rancorous politics it espouses, produce a disturbing picture of Egypt today."--FredHalliday, author of Nation and Religion in the Middle East and Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics
"Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social or political activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it as monodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary. No God But God debunks these one-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering anincisive, fresh, and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but a congenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking to redefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects are groping for meaning, and recreating themselves in theprocess, the same may not be said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the image of an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoire of tactics." --Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, HarvardUniversity
"Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social orpolitical activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it asmonodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary. No God But God debunks theseone-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering an incisive, fresh,and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but acongenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking toredefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects aregroping for meaning, and recreating themselves in the process, the same may notbe said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the imageof an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoireof tactics." --Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations andAnthropology, Harvard University
"Western observers and regime apologists tend to oversimplify social or political activism when it exhibits an Islamic coloration, casting it as monodimensional, uncompromising, and reactionary. No God But God debunks these one-dimensional depictions of Egyptian Muslims by offering anincisive, fresh, and richly drawn canvas. Yet, Abdo's book is not simply a riposte, but a congenial, informed, and often affectionate account of Muslims seeking to redefine themselves, their politics, and their society. If her subjects are groping for meaning, and recreating themselves in theprocess, the same may not be said of the government. Abdo's material is devastating, not least the image of an inept, uncreative, but often brutal government with a limited repertoire of tactics."--Augustus Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, HarvardUniversity
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, August 2000
Booklist, October 2000
Library Journal, October 2000
Boston Book Review, December 2000
Washington Post, December 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study shows that in Egypt a new type of Islamic revival has been quietly taking shape. It offers a new model for the transformation of a secular nation-state to an Islamic one without the violent overthrow of the ruling power.
Long Description
Shrouded in mystery, the Islamic presence in the Middle East evokes longstanding Western fears of terrorism and holy war. Our media have consistently focused on these extremes of Islam, overlooking a quiet yet pervasive religious movement that is now transforming the nation of Egypt. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, No God But God opens up previously inaccessible segments of Egyptian society--from the universities and professional sectors to the streets--to illustrate the deep penetration of "Popular Islamic" influence. Abdo provides a firsthand account of this peaceful movement, allowing its moderate leaders, street preachers, scholars, doctors, lawyers, men and women of all social classes to speak for themselves. Challenging Western stereotypes, she finds that this growing number of Islamists do not seek the violent overthrow of the government or a return to a medieval age. Instead, they believe their religious values are compatible with the demands of the modern world. They are working within and beyond the secular framework of the nation to gradually create a new society based on Islamic principles. Abdo narrates fascinating accounts of their methods and successes. Today, for example, university students meet in underground unions, despite a state ban. In addition, sheikhs have recently used their new legislative power to censor books and movies deemed to violate religious values. Both fascinating and unsettling, Abdo's findings identify a grassroots model for transforming a secular nation-state to an Islamic social order that will likely inspire other Muslim nations. This model cannot be ignored, for it will soon help organized Islamists to undermine secular control of Egypt and potentially jeopardize Western interests in the Arab world.
Main Description
Shrouded in mystery, the Islamic presence in the Middle East evokes longstanding Western fears of terrorism and holy war. Our media have consistently focused on these extremes of Islam, overlooking a quiet yet pervasive religious movement that is now transforming the nation of Egypt. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, No God But God opens up previously inaccessible segments of Egyptian society--from the universities and professional sectors to the streets--to illustrate the deep penetration of "Popular Islamic" influence. Abdo provides a firsthand account of this peacefulmovement, allowing its moderate leaders, street preachers, scholars, doctors, lawyers, men and women of all social classes to speak for themselves. Challenging Western stereotypes, she finds that this growing number of Islamists do not seek the violent overthrow of the government or a return to amedieval age. Instead, they believe their religious values are compatible with the demands of the modern world. They are working within and beyond the secular framework of the nation to gradually create a new society based on Islamic principles. Abdo narrates fascinating accounts of their methodsand successes. Today, for example, university students meet in underground unions, despite a state ban. In addition, sheikhs have recently used their new legislative power to censor books and movies deemed to violate religious values. Both fascinating and unsettling, Abdo's findings identify a grassroots model for transforming a secular nation-state to an Islamic social order that will likely inspire other Muslim nations. This model cannot be ignored, for it will soon help organized Islamists to undermine secular control ofEgypt and potentially jeopardize Western interests in the Arab world.
Main Description
Shrouded in mystery, the Islamic presence in the Middle East evokes longstanding Western fears of terrorism and holy war. Our media have consistently focused on these extremes of Islam, overlooking a quiet yet pervasive religious movement that is now transforming the nation of Egypt. Drawing on hundreds of interviews,No God But Godopens up previously inaccessible segments of Egyptian society--from the universities and professional sectors to the streets--to illustrate the deep penetration of "Popular Islamic" influence. Abdo provides a firsthand account of this peaceful movement, allowing its moderate leaders, street preachers, scholars, doctors, lawyers, men and women of all social classes to speak for themselves. Challenging Western stereotypes, she finds that this growing number of Islamists do not seek the violent overthrow of the government or a return to a medieval age. Instead, they believe their religious values are compatible with the demands of the modern world. They are working within and beyond the secular framework of the nation to gradually create a new society based on Islamic principles. Abdo narrates fascinating accounts of their methods and successes. Today, for example, university students meet in underground unions, despite a state ban. In addition, sheikhs have recently used their new legislative power to censor books and movies deemed to violate religious values. Both fascinating and unsettling, Abdo's findings identify a grassroots model for transforming a secular nation-state to an Islamic social order that will likely inspire other Muslim nations. This model cannot be ignored, for it will soon help organized Islamists to undermine secular control of Egypt and potentially jeopardize Western interests in the Arab world.
Unpaid Annotation
Abdo provides a firsthand account of the peaceful "Popular Islamic" movement in Egypt, allowing its moderate leaders, street preachers, scholars, doctors, men, and women of all social classes to speak for themselves. Both fascinating and unsettling, the author's findings identify a grassroots model for transforming a secular nation-state to an Islamic social order.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Note on Transliterationp. xi
The New Face of Islamp. 3
Streets of Greenp. 19
The Fount of Islamp. 41
The Professionalsp. 71
School of Revolutionp. 107
Taking the Veilp. 139
Court of Public Opinionp. 163
To Iran and Back Againp. 187
Notesp. 201
Selected Bibliographyp. 209
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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