Catalogue


St. Cuthbert : his life and cult in medieval Durham /
Dominic Marner.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2000.
description
112 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
0802035183 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2000.
isbn
0802035183 :
general note
Co-published by the British Library.
catalogue key
4029418
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dominic Marner was a lecturer in medieval art and architecture at the University of Edinburgh. More recently as Senior Research Associate at the School of World Art Studies, University of East Anglia
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2001
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Summaries
Description for Reader
St. Cuthbert, who died in 687 in his hermitage on Fame Island off the coast of Northumbria, became one of the most important saints of the Middle Ages and was (and indeed remains today) a key figure in the religious and political life of north-east England. A great many churches were dedicated to his memory. The Lindisfarne Gospels was produced in his honour and the exquisite Gospel of St. Cuthbert (the Stonyhurst Gospel) was placed in his coffin. Both these manuscripts are among the treasures of the British Library. So, too, is the superlative illuminated Life of St. Cuthbert, produced in Durham c.1185, certainly one of the most important examples of visual hagiography of any period or place to have survived. This manuscript forms the cornerstone of this book, and all 42 of the extant full-page miniatures are reproduced (in 4-colour plus special gold). After a preliminary chapter which places Cuthbert in his historical context, Dominic Marner then moves forward to Durham in the 1170's and 1180's, when the cult of St. Cuthbert was being fostered internationally by the community of monks and the Bishop, Hugh du Puiset, in rivalry with Canterbury where the cult of St. Thomas Becket had quickly achieved a phenomenal success. The illuminated Life is discussed in the context of the revitalisation of the cult of the saint, and the manuscript is compared with several others created in Durham at the time and described in detail. The narrative components and techniques employed in illustrating the key episodes is analysed, especially the clear motivation of the artist to portray Cuthbert in an emotional and sympathetic manner. This is a book that is intended for a wide and varied audience - those interested in medieval religious history and art, who will relish the superb colour reproductions at an affordable price, as much as a more specialist readership.
Description for Reader
St. Cuthbert, who died in 687 in his hermitage on Fame Island off the coast of Northumbria, became one of the most important saints of the Middle Ages and was (and indeed remains today) a key figure in the religious and political life of north-east England. A great many churches were dedicated to his memory. The Lindisfarne Gospels was produced in his honour and the exquisite Gospel of St. Cuthbert (the Stonyhurst Gospel) was placed in his coffin. Both these manuscripts are among the treasures of the British Library. So, too, is the superlative illuminated Life of St. Cuthbert, produced in Durham c.1185, certainly one of the most important examples of visual hagiography of any period or place to have survived. This manuscript forms the cornerstone of this book, and all 42 of the extant full-page miniatures are reproduced (in 4-colour plus special gold).After a preliminary chapter which places Cuthbert in his historical context, Dominic Marner then moves forward to Durham in the 1170's and 1180's, when the cult of St. Cuthbert was being fostered internationally by the community of monks and the Bishop, Hugh du Puiset, in rivalry with Canterbury where the cult of St. Thomas Becket had quickly achieved a phenomenal success. The illuminated Life is discussed in the context of the revitalisation of the cult of the saint, and the manuscript is compared with several others created in Durham at the time and described in detail. The narrative components and techniques employed in illustrating the key episodes is analysed, especially the clear motivation of the artist to portray Cuthbert in an emotional and sympathetic manner.This is a book that is intended for a wide and varied audience - those interested in medieval religious history and art, who will relish the superb colour reproductions at an affordable price, as much as a more specialist readership.
Table of Contents
Notep. 6
Acknowledgementsp. 6
List of Platesp. 7
Introductionp. 9
Cuthbert and Lindisfarnep. 11
Cuthbert and Durhamp. 20
The Life of St Cuthbertp. 37
Conclusionp. 54
The Platesp. 57
Abbreviationsp. 104
Appendixp. 105
Notesp. 106
Select Bibliographyp. 110
Indexp. 111
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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