Catalogue


John Dryden : tercentenary essays /
edited by Paul Hammond and David Hopkins.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2000.
description
xiii, 415 p.
ISBN
0198186444 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2000.
isbn
0198186444 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4021591
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
Dryden read the present through the past and translated classical and early texts into the idiom of his own time. But as Hammond writes in an introductory essay to this commemorative volume, Dryden wrote not only for his age, but for all time. To appreciate the classic Dryden, then, modern readers need to be aware of the past and present worlds evoked in his works, and also of their reception both by his contemporary and later readers. The 12 thoughtfully commissioned essays presented here provide convincing proof of Hammond's claim. They center principally on the later works of the more serious, self-conscious poet (the translations, The Fables, Alexander's Feast), and they emphasize Dryden's engagement with other writers (his classical predecessors, Milton, Congreve) and the historical impact of his works. Other essays include a political reading of Mac Flecknoe, a consideration of the staging of popular politics in the early heroic plays and The Duke of Guise, and a reorientation of Dryden's place in literary history. The volume appropriately concludes with Hopkins's discussion of the editorial problems encountered in representing Dryden to readers in a new century and with Hammond's appendix of 74 contemporary allusions to the poet omitted in Hugh Macdonald's bibliography John Dryden (1939). It is a splendid celebration. Highly recommended. G. R. Wasserman; emeritus, Russell Sage College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'as Hammond writes in an introductory essay to this commemorative volume, Dryden wrote not only for his age, but for all time. To appreciate the classic Dryden, then, modern readers need to be aware of the past and present worlds evoked in his works, and also of their reception both by hiscontemporary and later readers. The 12 thoughtfully commissioned essays presented here provide convincing proof of Hammond's claim.'Choice, Vol. 38, No. 8, April 2001
'a splendid celebration. Highly recommended.'G.R.Wasserman, Choice, April 2001
'Three hundred years after his death Dryden has been well served by those scholars devoted to his works.'Contemporary Review
'a splendid celebration. Highly recommended.'G.R.Wasserman, Choice, April 2001'as Hammond writes in an introductory essay to this commemorative volume, Dryden wrote not only for his age, but for all time. To appreciate the classic Dryden, then, modern readers need to be aware of the past and present worlds evoked in his works, and also of their reception both by his contemporary and later readers. The 12 thoughtfully commissioned essays presented here provide convincing proof of Hammond's claim.'Choice, Vol. 38, No. 8, April 2001'Three hundred years after his death Dryden has been well served by those scholars devoted to his works.'Contemporary Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Designed to celebrate and reassess the work of John Dryden (1631-1700), this text assembles essays addressing his political writing, drama and translations, his literary collaborations, contemporary reputation and posthumous reception.
Long Description
This volume is designed to celebrate and re-assess the work of John Dryden (1631-1700) in the tercentenary year of his death. It assembles specially-commissioned essays by an international team of scholars who address Dryden's political writing, drama, and translations, his literary collaborations, contemporary reputation, and posthumous reception. Much of Dryden's work was written in response to contemporary events and issues, and several of the essays in this volume discuss the personal and public circumstances in which his works were composed and received, exploring his responses to popular politics, and his relations with Congreve, Milton, Purcell, and Shadwell. But Dryden's intellectual and imaginative world was also shaped by the work of his literary predecessors, and so the collection charts his creative engagement with classical poetry, especially Homer and Virgil. Other essays attend to his poetic self-representation, his philosophical vision, and the problem of editing Dryden's poetry for a modern readership. The collection as a whole presents him as a writer not only for an age, but for all time.
Main Description
This volume is designed to celebrate and re-assess the work of John Dryden (1631-1700) in the tercentenary year of his death. It assembles specially-commissioned essays by an international team of scholars who address Dryden's political writing, drama, and translations, his literary collaborations, contemporary reputation, and posthumous reception.
Main Description
This volume is designed to celebrate and re-assess the work of John Dryden (1631-1700) in the tercentenary year of his death. It assembles specially-commissioned essays by an international team of scholars who address Dryden's political writing, drama, and translations, his literarycollaborations, contemporary reputation, and posthumous reception. Much of Dryden's work was written in response to contemporary events and issues, and several of the essays in this volume discuss the personal and public circumstances in which his works were composed and received, exploring hisresponses to popular politics, and his relations with Congreve, Milton, Purcell, and Shadwell. But Dryden's intellectual and imaginative world was also shaped by the work of his literary predecessors, and so the collection charts his creative engagement with classical poetry, especially Homer andVirgil. Other essays attend to his poetic self-representation, his philosophical vision, and the problem of editing Dryden's poetry for a modern readership. The collection as a whole presents him as a writer not only for an age, but for all time.
Table of Contents
A note on contributors
Introduction: Is Dryden a classic?
Mac Flecknoe, Heir of Augustus
Dryden's Milton and the theatre of imagination
Dryden and the staging of popular politics
Constructing classicism: Dryden and Purcell
Dryden and Congreve's collaboration in The Double Dealer
Alexander's Feast, or the Power of Music: The poem and its readers
Dryden, Tonson, and the patrons of The Works of Virgil (1697)
'The Last Parting of Hector and Andromache'
'According to my Genius': Dryden's translation of 'The First Book of Homer's Ilias'
The final 'Memorial of my own Principles': Dryden's alter egos in his later career
Dryden and the dissolution of things: The decay of structures in Dryden's later writing
Editing, authenticity, and translation: Re-presenting Dryden's poetry in 2000
Appendix: Some contemporary
References to Dryden
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem