Catalogue


Invisible sojourners : African immigrant diaspora in the United States /
John A. Arthur.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2000.
description
x, 200 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
027596759X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2000.
isbn
027596759X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4007684
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John A. Arthur is Professor of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Minnesota, Duluth Campus.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
Though they represent less than five percent of recent US immigrants, Africans are having profound impacts on American cities. Nigerian cabbies, Ethiopian restaurateurs, and Senegalese sidewalk vendors may be African immigrants' most familiar faces, but as Arthur notes, thousands of less visible, highly educated Africans contribute to health care and other vital professions. African immigrants often consciously retain their "foreigner" status to distinguish themselves from African Americans and so avoid ingrained racial prejudices as much as possible. Such deliberate distancing also reflects their intentions to return to Africa after years of sending funds to help extended families and build retirement homes. Arthur, himself an African immigrant, is at his best in describing the tensions, dilemmas, and contradictions of such choices, based upon surveys and interviews he conducted in four US cities and his reading of INS and census data (albeit only through 1990). He broaches important questions and contributes to a scant literature. Yet because he is not a reflexive writer and generalizes from his findings without providing statistics or counter arguments, readers will find it difficult to differentiate between Arthur's own ideology and his data. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. F. Roberts; University of California, Los Angeles
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ...a welcome addition to the literature on African immigrants in the United States. The general reader will come away with a comprehensive understanding of this rising ethnic group. By facilitating this understanding, the book succeeds in its aim of erasing the invisibility of African immigrants.'' Contemporary Sociology
'œUpper-division undergraduates and above.'' Choice
"Upper-division undergraduates and above."- Choice
'œ[W]ill mainly interest researchers working in the areas of African and African American studies and students of race and ethnic relations. It will also appeal to those who seek to understand the global dimensions of the continuing African diaspora.'' The Journal of American History
"[W]ill mainly interest researchers working in the areas of African and African American studies and students of race and ethnic relations. It will also appeal to those who seek to understand the global dimensions of the continuing African diaspora."- The Journal of American History
"Diaspora studies is inspiring very exciting research on people of African decent in the Atlantic World. In this study of the African immigrant diaspora in the United States, John Arthur provides insight into the evolution and development of the African Diaspora. While people have migrated for centuries for obvious economic and ideological reasons, this book explains the economic and political roots of African migration in the 20th century. The book provides demographic and statistical evidence that Africans are the most important visible immigrant group in America in the last three decades....[t]his is a good overview of the African immigrant experience, how they construct membership in the American society and the future of African immigration."- African Studies Quarterly
'œDiaspora studies is inspiring very exciting research on people of African decent in the Atlantic World. In this study of the African immigrant diaspora in the United States, John Arthur provides insight into the evolution and development of the African Diaspora. While people have migrated for centuries for obvious economic and ideological reasons, this book explains the economic and political roots of African migration in the 20th century. The book provides demographic and statistical evidence that Africans are the most important visible immigrant group in America in the last three decades....[t]his is a good overview of the African immigrant experience, how they construct membership in the American society and the future of African immigration.'' African Studies Quarterly
"...a welcome addition to the literature on African immigrants in the United States. The general reader will come away with a comprehensive understanding of this rising ethnic group. By facilitating this understanding, the book succeeds in its aim of erasing the invisibility of African immigrants."- Contemporary Sociology
'œInvisible Sojourners: African Immigrant Diaspora in the United States, creates the groundwork to further research and problematize the impact of African immigrants of the last generation with regard to their impact on an emerging awareness in ideational discourse from the Sub-Sahara African Diaspora. Suffice it to say Arthur's text is therefore an important contribution.'' The Griot
"Invisible Sojourners: African Immigrant Diaspora in the United States, creates the groundwork to further research and problematize the impact of African immigrants of the last generation with regard to their impact on an emerging awareness in ideational discourse from the Sub-Sahara African Diaspora. Suffice it to say Arthur's text is therefore an important contribution."- The Griot
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Arthur examines the forces that have shaped recent African migration to the United States, looking at the characteristics of the African immigrant population, residential and settlement patterns, family and household structure, labor force participation, and pathways to American citizenship. The meanings of the migratory process as well as relationships with the dominant society, and intra immigrant associative networks also are analyzed.
Long Description
Arthur documents the role that Africa's best and brightest play in the new migration of population from less developed countries to the United States. He highlights how Africans negotiate and forge relationships among themselves and with the members of the host society. Multiple aspects of the African immigrants' social world, family patterns, labor force participation, and formation of cultural identities are also examined. He lays out the long term aspirations of the immigrants within the context of the geo-political, economic, and social conditions in Africa. Ultimately, Arthur explains why people leave Africa, what they encounter, their interactions with the host society, and their attitudes about American social institutions. He also provides information about the social changes and policies that African countries need to adopt to stem the tide, or even reverse, the African brain drain. A detailed analysis for scholars, students, and other researchers involved with African and immigration studies and contemporary American society.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introduction: African Immigrants in the New Global Migrationp. 1
Causes of African Migration to the United States and the Dynamics of the Post-Arrival Adjustment Processp. 17
Portrait of the African Immigrants in the United Statesp. 35
From the Horn of Africa to the Northern Plains of Minnesota: The Case of the African Refugeesp. 51
African Immigrant Social Networks, Race Relations, and Social Integrationp. 69
Family, Household Structure, Educational Attainment, and Business Formationp. 95
The Lives of the Immigrant Women and Their Childrenp. 109
Pathways to Naturalization, Repatriation, and Future Goalsp. 125
The Future of African Immigration to the United Statesp. 141
Appendix: Figure, Tables, and Survey Questionnairep. 151
Survey Questionnairep. 158
Bibliographyp. 187
Indexp. 193
About the Authorp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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