Catalogue


Soldiers in a narrow land : the Pinochet regime in Chile /
Mary Helen Spooner.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
description
xi, 305 p.
ISBN
0520080831 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
isbn
0520080831 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
398118
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"An accurate and objective account of the political events in Chile. . . . An important document for those who want to know what happened, and for those who should not forget."--Isabel Allende
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1994-05-15:
Freelance journalist Spooner spent most of the 1980s in Chile, where she was able to interview a wide cross section of Chileans under the military dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet. Her account stands as quality journalism, depicting the country's political life from the September 1973 coup to the restoration of civilian government under President Patricio Aylwin in March 1990. One of the first acts of that regime was the public reburial of martyred President Salvador Allende. Spooner gives more credence to the suicide version of his death in the coup than do most sources. In addition, she holds that Pinochet was initially a reluctant participant in the coup. While her account is less analytical than Pamela Constable and Arturo Valenzuela's A Nation of Enemies (LJ 8/91), it is factually sound and balanced and is rich in human details of those involved in these public events. For large public and academic libraries with significant Latin American holdings.-James Rhodes, Luther Coll., Decorah, Ia. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1994-10:
Spooner, a journalist who lived in Chile for nine years beginning in 1980, covered events there for publications such as Newsweek, the Economist, and the Financial Times. Her narrative account of the Pinochet dictatorship from 1973 to 1990 focuses primarily on the consolidation of the regime in its early years and on its demise almost two decades later. The approach is journalistic and descriptive, in contrast to the greater analytic depth of Pamela Constable and Arturo Valenzuela's A Nation of Enemies: Chile Under Pinochet (CH, Jan'92). Spooner concentrates on the regime itself; there is less information on opposition forces and relatively little on Chile's democratic politics before or after the military dictatorship. The book's unique contribution is its discussion of the regime's economic policies and performance. Although the discussion is not as comprehensive and analytic as advanced readers might wish, this readable book should appeal to a general as well as academic audience interested in Chile. A. B. Cochran; Agnes Scott College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, April 1994
Library Journal, May 1994
Choice, October 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
On September 11, 1973, a military coup in Chile overthrew the socialist government of Salvador Allende, beginning an era of political repression that lasted over sixteen years. Mary Helen Spooner takes us behind the Pinochet regime's wall of censorship, silence, and propaganda and provides an inside look at a brutal dictatorship. She traces the personal histories of key political figures, explains why many Chileans supported the regime, and reveals the fate of many of its victims. The 1998 arrest of Augusto Pinochet and resulting events serve as a reminder of his harrowing legacy. In a new preface ( Paper edition ) Spooner looks at how Chile has changed in the 1990s and places recent events in a larger historical context.
Long Description
On September 11, 1973, a military coup in Chile overthrew the socialist government of Salvador Allende, beginning an era of political repression that lasted over sixteen years. Mary Helen Spooner takes us behind the Pinochet regime's wall of censorship, silence, and propaganda and provides an inside look at a brutal dictatorship. She traces the personal histories of key political figures, explains why many Chileans supported the regime, and reveals the fate of many of its victims. The 1998 arrest of Augusto Pinochet and resulting events serve as a reminder of his harrowing legacy. In a new preface (Paper edition) Spooner looks at how Chile has changed in the 1990s and places recent events in a larger historical context.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Prologue: Chilean Voicesp. 1
The Dictator's Rise
Coup Plottingp. 17
The Aftermathp. 49
Military Governmentp. 83
Dirty Warriorsp. 113
The New Institutionalityp. 140
Dictatorship's Demise
Cracks in the Orderp. 163
Days of Ragep. 183
Heroes and Villainsp. 204
Pinochetistasp. 223
Twilight of the Dictatorp. 246
Notesp. 269
Select Bibliographyp. 289
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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