Catalogue

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Allegories of union in Irish and English writing, 1790-1870 : politics, history, and the family from Edgeworth to Arnold /
Mary Jean Corbett.
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
description
x, 228 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521661323 hardback
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
isbn
0521661323 hardback
catalogue key
3970233
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-224) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-01-03:
In his long and formidable introduction, Corbett (Miami Univ., Ohio) states his intention to inform readers "in English and postcolonial studies about the particular histories to which those representatives respond and contribute, and to suggest to readers in Irish studies that English colonial discourse is by no means as monolithic and insensitive to historical change as their critical studies make it seem." Armed with deconstructionist, gender, and anthropological (racial) theories, Corbett examines five areas: public affections and familial politics (the 1790s); the novels of Owenson and Edgeworth as they relate to Irish union; the immigrant Irish in Urban England (mid 1800s); colonial authority in Trollope (1845-1860); and England's character (the 1860s). Of particular significance is Corbett's successful effort to place the literature of Irish writers as essential to the "English and Irish identities" rather than peripheral "to the main lines of development of the novel." Graduate students, researchers, faculty. F. L. Ryan; Stonehill College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a very timely book that brings concerns regarding gender and postcolonialism to bear on the discourse--specifically political commentary and novels--regarding the relationship between Ireland and England from the 1790s to the 1860s...Corbett's book is impressively lucid..." Victorian Studies
"...impressive scholarship helps to make Allegories of Union a significant contribution to recent critical work attentive to how modern post-colonial theory, with its emphasis on "heterogeneity" and "hybridity," can illuminate 'analogous struggles over meaning in the past.'" Victorians Institute Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Through postcolonial and feminist theory, Mary Jean Corbett explores fictional and non-fictional representations of Ireland's relationship with England thoughout the 19th century, with reference to works by Gaskell, Burke, Carlyle and others.
Description for Bookstore
Corbett explores fictional and non-fictional representations of Ireland's relationship with England throughout the nineteenth century. She considers the uses of familial and domestic metaphors in structuring narratives that enact the 'union' of England and Ireland. Corbett situates her readings of novels by Edgeworth, Gaskell, and Trollope, and writings by Burke, Engels, and Mill, within the varying historical contexts that shape them, and revises the critical orthodoxies surrounding colonial discourse that currently prevail in Irish and English studies, and offers a fresh perspective on important aspects of Victorian culture.
Description for Bookstore
Corbett explores fictional and non-fictional representations of Ireland's relationship with England throughout the nineteenth century. She situates her readings of novels by Edgeworth, Gaskell, and Trollope, and writings by Burke, Engels, and Mill, within the historical contexts that shape them, offering a fresh perspective on important aspects of Victorian culture.
Long Description
Corbett explores fictional and nonfictional representations of Ireland's relationship with England throughout the nineteenth century. She considers the uses of familial and domestic metaphors in structuring narratives that enact the "union" of England and Ireland. Corbett situates her readings of novels by Edgeworth, Gaskell, and Trollope, and writings by Burke, Engels, and Mill, within the varying historical contexts that shape them. She revises the critical orthodoxies surrounding colonial discourse that currently prevail in Irish and English studies, and offers a fresh perspective on important aspects of Victorian culture.
Main Description
In this book, Mary Jean Corbett explores fictional and non-fictional representations of Ireland’s relationship with England throughout the nineteenth century. Through postcolonial and feminist theory, she considers how cross-cultural contact is negotiated through tropes of marriage and family, and demonstrates how familial rhetoric sometimes works to sustain, sometimes to contest the structures of colonial inequality. Analyzing novels by Edgeworth, Owenson, Gaskell, Kingsley, and Trollope, as well as writings by Burke, Carlyle, Engels, Arnold, and Mill, Corbett argues that the colonizing imperative for ‘reforming’ the Irish in an age of imperial expansion constitutes a largely unrecognized but crucial element in the rhetorical project of English nation-formation. By situating her readings within the varying historical and rhetorical contexts that shape them, she revises the critical orthodoxies surrounding colonial discourse that currently prevail in Irish and English studies, and offers a fresh perspective on important aspects of Victorian culture.
Main Description
In this book, Mary Jean Corbett explores fictional and non-fictional representations of Ireland's relationship with England throughout the nineteenth century. Through postcolonial and feminist theory, she considers how cross-cultural contact is negotiated through tropes of marriage and family, and demonstrates how familial rhetoric sometimes works to sustain, sometimes to contest the structures of colonial inequality. Analyzing novels by Edgeworth, Owenson, Gaskell, Kingsley, and Trollope, as well as writings by Burke, Carlyle, Engels, Arnold, and Mill, Corbett argues that the colonizing imperative for 'reforming' the Irish in an age of imperial expansion constitutes a largely unrecognized but crucial element in the rhetorical project of English nation-formation. By situating her readings within the varying historical and rhetorical contexts that shape them, she revises the critical orthodoxies surrounding colonial discourse that currently prevail in Irish and English studies, and offers a fresh perspective on important aspects of Victorian culture.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Public affections and familial politics: Burke, Edgeworth, and Ireland in the 1790sp. 21
Allegories of prescription: engendering Union in Owenson and Edgeworthp. 51
Troubling others: representing the immigrant Irish in urban England around mid-centuryp. 82
Plotting colonial authority: Trollope's Ireland, 1845-1860p. 114
England's opportunity, England's character: Arnold, Mill, and the Union in the 1860sp. 148
Afterwordp. 182
Notesp. 186
Bibliographyp. 212
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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