Catalogue


Gay-Lussac, scientist and bourgeois /
Maurice Crosland.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1978.
description
xvi, 333 p. : port. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521219795
format(s)
Other
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1978.
isbn
0521219795
general note
Includes indexes.
catalogue key
3929076
 
Bibliography: p. 312-323.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This exact and handsome reprint of a book published in 1978 [] is now available through Cambridge's 'print on demand' system ... makes a good read ... This meaty book passes the test of time.' Notes and Records of the Royal Society
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This is the first work to examine critically both the scientific work and the man behind it, and as well as providing the historian of science with a comprehensive account of the life and work of a major nineteenth-century scientist, the book will also be of value to the social and economic historian.
Description for Library
Gay-Lussac is best known for his chemical work but also made important contributions to other physical sciences and technology. This is the first work to examine critically both the scientific work and the man behind it, and as well as providing the historian of science with a comprehensive account of the life and work of a major nineteenth-century scientist, the book will also be of value to the social and economic historian.
Main Description
Gay-Lussac is best known for his chemical work but also made important contributions to other physical sciences and technology. This is the first work to examine critically both the scientific work and the man behind it. Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778-1850) lived through three revolutions in France and his life reflected the social transformations taking place around him. His education and early progress in science depended on the Revolution of 1789 and on the patronage of the chemist Berthollet, a close associate of Napoleon Bonaparte. Gay-Lussac may be seen as the first 'professional' scientist and indeed, throughout the book, Professor Crosland emphasises that he knew how to use his science to solve practical problems and was able to profit considerably from this application.
Table of Contents
Preface
Chronological table
List of abbreviations
A young provincial in Paris
The apprentice of Arcueil
Personal influences and the search for laws
Collaboration and rivalry
The volumetric approach
Scientific research
Professor, academician and editor
A scientist in the service of government and industry
A new technique and the dissemination of technical information
Scientist and bourgeois in the political arena
The legacy
Appendix
Notes
Select bibliography
Name index
Subject index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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