Catalogue


Contextualizing the Renaissance : returns to history : selected proceedings from the 28th annual CEMERS Conference /
edited by Albert H. Tricomi.
imprint
Binghamton, N.Y. : Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies ; [Turnhout, Belgium?] : Brepols, [1999?]
description
vi, 230 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
2503508499
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Binghamton, N.Y. : Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies ; [Turnhout, Belgium?] : Brepols, [1999?]
isbn
2503508499
contents note
Writing the history of the present : conceptualizing early modern literature / Jean E. Howard -- Mapping theory in history : conceptual cites and social sites in the French monarchic state / Sarah Hanley --- Dueling and civility in sixteenth-century Italy / David Quint -- The place of Vives's Instruction of a Christen woman in early modern English domestic book literature / Margaret Mikesell -- Motivating history / Keith Moxey -- Tainted image/sacred image : the wandering Madonna of S. Maria in Vallicella / Laura MacCaskey -- Viewing Foucault viewing Velásquez's Las meniñas / James Byrnes -- Form and pressure : Shakespearean drama and the Elizabethan state / Louis Montrose -- Embodying origins : an anatomy of a yeoman's daughter, Spenser's Argante, and Elizabeth I / David Kinahan -- Reading history, reading power, reading plays : Graham Holderness on Shakespeare's history plays / William O. Scott.
general note
Conference held in Oct. 1994.
Some articles or portions of articles are reprints.
catalogue key
3866907
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The 28th Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, held on 21-22 October 1994 at Binghamton University, featured 33 panel sessions and approximately 150 presentations. The ten essays in this volume consist of the five plenary speakers - leaders in their field - and five panel essays, each of which was reviewed for this volume. The volume comprises a body of work organised around a governing theme - modes of historicisation. Each of the essays demonstrates the practice of or a commentary upon a distinctive historicised criticism. By 'historicised' as contrasted with 'historical' criticism, it is meant that these essays problematicise, stretch or reconceive traditional historical practices. Challenging the notion that the production of paintings, dramatic texts or even conduct books can be read against a stable historical ground, they show that paintings, works of literature, and treatises not only participate in history but are exemplars of textual instability. The very content of these texts can be shown, in various editions, to change over time - and yet each bears a single, determinate title. In such ways the contributions gathered here all show that they have been affected by 'the new history'. Contributions include: Albert H. Tricomi, 'Introduction: trends in historicizing Early Modern literature, history, and the visual arts'. Part 1: Literature and History as Critical Practices Jean E. Howard, 'Writing the history of the present: contextualizing Early Modern literature'; Sarah Hanley, 'Mapping theory in history: conceptual cites and social cites in the French monarchic state'; David Quint, 'Dueling and civility in sixteenth-century Italy'; Margaret Mikesell, 'The place of Vives's Instruction of a Christen Woman in Early Modern English domestic book literature'. Part 2: Rehistoricizing through the Visual Arts Keith Moxey, 'Motivating history'; Laura MacCaskey, ' The essays in this volume challenge the notion that the production of paintings, dramatic texts or even conduct books can be read against a stable historical ground, yet they show that paintings, works of literature, and treatises not only participate in history but are exemplars of textual instability.
Unpaid Annotation
The volume comprises a body of work organised around a governing theme - modes of historicization. Each of the essays demonstrates the practice of or a commentary upon a distinctive historicized criticism. By 'historicized' as contrasted with 'historical' criticism, it is meant that these essays problematicize, stretch or reconceive traditional historical practices. Challenging the notion that the production of paintings, dramatic texts or even conduct books can be read against a stable historical ground, they show that paintings, works of literature, and treatises not only participate in history but are exemplars of textual instability. The very content of these texts can be shown, in various editions, to change over time - and yet each bears a single, determinate title. In such ways the contributions gathered here all show that they have been affected by 'the new history'.

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