Catalogue


Through ordinary eyes : the Civil War correspondence of Rufus Robbins, private, 7th Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers /
edited with and introduction by Ella Jane Bruen, Brian M. Fitzgibbons ; Jon Wakelyn, advisory editor.
imprint
Westport, CT : Praeger, 2000.
description
xi, 220 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0275965899 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ella Jane Bruen teaches at Sacred Heart High School and Intermediate School in Kingston, Massachusetts. She has served on the boards of F.C.P., Family Continuity Program, a social service agency and also on the Plymouth Antiquarian Society, an historical society in Plymouth Brian M. Fitzgibbons has been a Civil War re-enactor with the Massachusetts Twelfth Regiment of Volunteers
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Through Ordinary Eyes is highly recommended reading. Through these letters, the reader gains not only a glimpse of one Civil War soldier's life and death but also a much fuller understanding of the support provided by his family back home as they sustained their eldest son and brother in his determination to support the Union." - Thomas R. Turner Professor of History Bridgewater State College
"Whether one studies religious life, the history of medicine and disease, the industrialization of America, or military history in its fullest sense, this manuscript provides valuable information....I see it as a uniquely valuable addition to the history of the United States, and a resource that both scholars and students will want to exploit." - Mary R. Habeck Asst. Professor Department of History Yale University
"...an unusual and informative set of letters and will be of interest to military and social historians alike, as well as general readers interested in the firsthand descriptions of wartime experiences."- North & South
'œ...a must-read. This text is extremely useful for living historians to understand the importance of letters as communication during the Civil War.'' Smoke & Fire News
"...provide an insightful look into the realms of familial relations and personal feelings engendered by the conflict....illuminate the trials of warfare as seen from distinctive viewpoints."- Civil War History
'œ...provide an insightful look into the realms of familial relations and personal feelings engendered by the conflict....illuminate the trials of warfare as seen from distinctive viewpoints.'' Civil War History
"...a must-read. This text is extremely useful for living historians to understand the importance of letters as communication during the Civil War."- Smoke & Fire News
'œ...an unusual and informative set of letters and will be of interest to military and social historians alike, as well as general readers interested in the firsthand descriptions of wartime experiences.'' North & South
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This extensive two-way exchange of letters between Rufus Robbins and members of his family provides a highly personalized view of the life of a Union soldier, as well as life on the home front in South Abington, Massachusetts, an important source of war materiel. Enlisting in the Seventh Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment at the seasoned age of 31, Rufus carefully crafts letters that are articulate, graphic, and often witty and that contribute much to our understanding of the daily course of the war. Notes from home reflect the Robbins family's ever-present worry and concern for Rufus' well-being. His brothers detail their involvement in the sewing of army boots, an activity for which South Abington held a large contract. As a confirmed Universalist, Rufus struggled to live a life of faith in the midst of war. His letters demonstrate the depth of his character, showing both maturity and confidence. However, as the war continued, one sees his belief in the righteousness of the Union cause, his confidence in God, and his sometimes naive simplicity replaced with a more realistic form of idealism. In this collection, those interested in military affairs can learn about the economic workings of the camps, the recreational outlets for the soldiers, and the grim realities of the Peninsula Campaign, while scholars focussing on civilian life will gain a greater understanding of the impact of the war on the families and friends left behind.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Letters from 1861p. 29
Letters from 1862p. 105
Letters from 1863p. 189
Chronology of the Seventh Regiment, July 15, 1861-November 16, 1862p. 193
Captain George Reed's Letter to the Abington Standardp. 199
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem