Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

UofT Libraries is getting a new library services platform in January 2021.
Learn more about the change.

End of millennium /
Manuel Castells.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Oxford ; Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
description
xv, 448 p. : ill.
ISBN
0631221395 (pb : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series author
series title
series title
imprint
Oxford ; Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
isbn
0631221395 (pb : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3840889
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [394]-426) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-01-03:
In this third volume of his "The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture" triology, Castells (Univ. of California, Berkeley) fills out his account of the transformation of the macropolitical and macrosocial contexts implied by the developments of the last 30 years, which are described and analyzed in his previous two volumes (v.1, The Rise of the Network Society, 2nd ed., 2000, 1st ed., CH, Feb'97; and v.2, The Power of Identity, 1997). Castells opens with an account of the collapse of the Soviet Union, a symbol of the previous order. He continues with accounts of the rise of the "fourth world," effectively excluded by the changes of the last three decades (using as examples sub-Saharan Africa and the ghettos of urban America); the new global criminal economy; the rise of the Asian-Pacific tigers; the transformation of Chinese communism; and the unification of Europe. The breadth of the reading and scholarship is impressive and, although inevitably inhabitants of particular subdisciplines will have their quibbles, the analysis is provocative, if not always as gloomily convincing as the author hopes. Strongly recommended for general readers and upper-division undergraduate through faculty audiences. D. E. Moggridge; University of Toronto
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The most compelling attempt yet made to map the contours of the global information age." Anthony Giddens, New Statesman. "A superlative achievement. Castells has succeeded in producing a study that positively invites comparison with Marx. As Marx in Capital sought to analyze the operation and social tensions of early industrial capitalism, so Castells in his trilogy aims to understand the system, global informational capitalism, that is replacing it. He has thus set himself the ultimate challenge; the confirmation is already to hand that he has met it." Peter Hall, Cities. "Not since Weber has there been such a determined and largely successful effort to bring to bear the results and analytical perspectives of all the social sciences on the evolution of society. It is to be hoped that his book will be read by social scientists of all kinds, but especially by economists since they, probably more than anyone else, need to be reminded that Max Weber was a professor of economics." Chris Freeman, New Political Economy. "A magnum opus if ever there was one, these three books together constitute, in my view, the finest piece of contemporary social analysis for at least a generation." Frank Webster, British Journal of Sociology.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The final volume in Manuel Castells' trilogy is devoted to processes of global social change induced by interaction between networks and identity. Castells studies empirically the collapse of the Soviet Union, tracing it back to the incapacity of industrial statism to manage the transition to the Information Age. He shows the rise of inequality, polarization, and social exclusion throughout the world, focusing on Africa, urban poverty, and the plight of children. He documents the formation of a global criminal economy that deeply affects economies and politics in many countries. He analyzes the political and cultural foundations of the emergence of the Asian Pacific as a critically important region in the global economy. And he reflects on the contradictions of European unification, proposing the concept of the network state. The new edition of End of Millennium includes a revised chapter on Pacific Asia taking into account recent trends, while the book has also been updated to account for developments in the European Union. In the general conclusion of the trilogy, included in this volume, Castells draws together the threads of his arguments and his findings, presenting a systematic interpretation of our world.
Back Cover Copy
The final volume in Manuel Castells' trilogy is devoted to processes of global social change induced by interaction between networks and identity.Castells studies empirically the collapse of the Soviet Union, tracing it back to the incapacity of industrial statism to manage the transition to the Information Age. He shows the rise of inequality, polarization, and social exclusion throughout the world, focusing on Africa, urban poverty, and the plight of children. He documents the formation of a global criminal economy that deeply affects economies and politics in many countries. He analyzes the political and cultural foundations of the emergence of the Asian Pacific as a critically important region in the global economy. And he reflects on the contradictions of European unification, proposing the concept of the network state. The new edition of End of Millennium includes a revised chapter on Pacific Asia taking into account recent trends, while the book has also been updated to account for developments in the European Union.In the general conclusion of the trilogy, included in this volume, Castells draws together the threads of his arguments and his findings, presenting a systematic interpretation of our world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Castells studies empirically the collapse of the Soviet Union, tracing it back to the incapacity of industrial statism to manage the transition to the information age. He also shows the rise of inequality, polarisation and exclusion in the world.
Main Description
The final volume in Manuel Castells' trilogy is devoted to processes of global social change induced by interaction between networks and identity.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Charts
Acknowledgments
A Time of Changep. 1
The Crisis of Industrial Statism and the Collapse of the Soviet Unionp. 5
The Extensive Model of Economic Growth and the Limits of Hyperindustrialismp. 10
The Technology Questionp. 26
The Abduction of Identity and the Crisis of Soviet Federalismp. 37
The Last Perestroikap. 46
Nationalism, Democracy, and the Disintegration of the Soviet Statep. 55
The Scars of History, the Lessons for Theory, the Legacy for Societyp. 61
The Rise of the Fourth World: Informational Capitalism, Poverty, and Social Exclusionp. 68
Toward a Polarized World? A Global Overviewp. 73
The De-humanization of Africap. 82
The New American Dilemma: Inequality, Urban Poverty, and Social Exclusion in the Information Agep. 128
Globalization, Over-exploitation, and Social Exclusion: the View from the Childrenp. 153
Conclusion: the Black Holes of Informational Capitalismp. 165
The Perverse Connection: the Global Criminal Economyp. 169
Organizational Globalization of Crime, Cultural Identification of Criminalsp. 171
The Pillage of Russiap. 183
Mechanisms of Accumulationp. 190
Narcotrafico, Development, and Dependency in Latin Americap. 195
The Impact of Global Crime on Economy, Politics, and Culturep. 206
Development and Crisis in the Asian Pacific: Globalization and the Statep. 212
The Changing Fortunes of the Asian Pacificp. 212
Heisei's Japan: Developmental State versus Information Societyp. 220
Beheading the Dragon? Four Asian Tigers with a Dragon Head, and their Civil Societiesp. 256
Chinese Developmental Nationalism with Socialist Characteristicsp. 307
Conclusion: Globalization and the Statep. 333
The Unification of Europe: Globalization, identity, and the Network Statep. 338
European Unification as a Sequence of Defensive Reactions: a Half-century Perspectivep. 340
Globalization and European Integrationp. 348
Cultural Identity and European Unificationp. 357
The Institutionalization of Europe: the Network Statep. 361
European Identity of European Project?p. 364
Conclusion: Making Sense of our Worldp. 366
Summary of Contents of Volumes I and IIp. 392
Referencesp. 394
Indexp. 427
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem