Catalogue


Exiting Indochina : U.S. leadership of the Cambodia settlement & normalization of relations with Vietnam /
Richard H. Solomon ; foreword by Stanley Karnow.
imprint
Washington, DC : United States Institute of Peace Press, 2000.
description
xx, 113 p. : map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1929223013 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, DC : United States Institute of Peace Press, 2000.
isbn
1929223013 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3809555
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
This book recounts the diplomacy that brought an end to great power involvement in Indochina -- including the negotiations for a UN peace process in Cambodia and construction of a "road map" for normalizing U.S.-Vietnam relations.Exiting Indochina also highlights the changing character of diplomacy at the beginning of the 1990s, when, at least temporarily, an era of military confrontation among the major world powers gave way to political management of international conflicts.
Long Description
For most Americans, the 'œexit' from Indochina occurred in 1973, with the withdrawal of the U.S. military from South Vietnam. In fact, the final exit did not occur until two decades later, after the collapse of the Republic of Vietnam in 1975, the Cambodian revolution, and a decade of Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia. Only in the early 1990s were the major powers able to negotiate a settlement of the Cambodia conflict and withdraw from the region. This book recounts the diplomacy that brought an end to great power involvement in Indochina, including the negotiations for a UN peace process in Cambodia and construction of a 'œroad map' for normalizing U.S.-Vietnam relations. In so doing, this volume also highlights the changing character of diplomacy at the beginning of the 1990s, when, at least temporarily, an era of military confrontation among the major world powers gave way to political management of international conflicts.
Long Description
For most Americans, the exit from Indochina occurred in 1973, with the withdrawal of the U.S. military from South Vietnam. In fact, the final exit did not occur until two decades later, after the collapse of the Republic of Vietnam in 1975, the Cambodian revolution, and a decade of Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia. Only in the early 1990s were the major powers able to negotiate a settlement of the Cambodia conflict and withdraw from the region. This book recounts the diplomacy that brought an end to great power involvement in Indochina, including the negotiations for a UN peace process in Cambodia and construction of a road map for normalizing U.S.-Vietnam relations. In so doing, this volume also highlights the changing character of diplomacy at the beginning of the 1990s, when, at least temporarily, an era of military confrontation among the major world powers gave way to political management of international conflicts.
Long Description
For most Americans, the Sexit from Indochina occurred in 1973, with the withdrawal of the U.S. military from South Vietnam. In fact, the final exit did not occur until two decades later, after the collapse of the Republic of Vietnam in 1975, the Cambodian revolution, and a decade of Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia. Only in the early 1990s were the major powers able to negotiate a settlement of the Cambodia conflict and withdraw from the region. This book recounts the diplomacy that brought an end to great power involvement in Indochina, including the negotiations for a UN peace process in Cambodia and construction of a Sroad map for normalizing U.S.-Vietnam relations. In so doing, this volume also highlights the changing character of diplomacy at the beginning of the 1990s, when, at least temporarily, an era of military confrontation among the major world powers gave way to political management of international conflicts.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introductionp. 3
Indochina: Trapped between Major Powersp. 9
From War to Diplomacyp. 13
Constructing a Peace Process for Cambodiap. 17
Progress at Parisp. 23
The United States Initiates a UN-Centered Effortp. 33
Building a Security Council Consensusp. 39
Herding Catsp. 49
Domestic Political Furyp. 59
The Provocative Role of the Mediap. 65
Building Consensus for the UN Settlement Planp. 71
Exiting the Vietnam Quagmirep. 79
The Playout: Who Won? Who Lost?p. 89
Conclusion: The United States as an International Mediatorp. 99
Bibliographyp. 105
Indexp. 109
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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