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Transatlantic ties in the Spanish empire : Brihuega, Spain, & Puebla, Mexico, 1560-1620 /
Ida Altman.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2000.
description
viii, 254 p. : ill., maps, geneal. tables ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0804736634 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0804736634 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3799057
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Between 1560 and 1620, a thousand or more people left the town of Brihuega in Spain to migrate to New Spain (now Mexico), where nearly all of them settled in Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain's second most important city. A medium-sized community of about four thousand people, Brihuega had been a center of textile production since the Middle Ages, but in the latter part of the sixteenth century its industry was in declinea circumstance that induced a significant number of its townspeople to emigrate to Puebla, where conditions for textile manufacturing seemed ideal. The immigrants from Brihuega played a crucial role in making Puebla the leading textile producer in New Spain, and they were otherwise active in the city's commercial-industrial sector as well. Although some immigrants penetrated the higher circles of poblano society and politics, for the most part they remained close to their entrepreneurial and artisanal origins. Closely associated through business, kinship, marital, and compadrazgo ties, and in residential patterns, the Brihuega immigrants in Puebla constituted a coherent and visible community. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants as a basis for analyzing society in Brihuega and Puebla, making direct comparisons between the two cities by examining such topics as mobility and settlement; politics and public life; economic activity; religious life; social relations; and marriage, family, and kinship. In tracing the socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional patterns of a town in Spain and a city in New Spainin all their connections, continuities, and discontinuitiesthe book offers a new basis for understanding the process and implications of the transference of these patterns within the early modern Hispanic world.
Flap Copy
Between 1560 and 1620, a thousand or more people left the town of Brihuega in Spain to migrate to New Spain (now Mexico), where nearly all of them settled in Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain's second most important city. A medium-sized community of about four thousand people, Brihuega had been a center of textile production since the Middle Ages, but in the latter part of the sixteenth century its industry was in decline--a circumstance that induced a significant number of its townspeople to emigrate to Puebla, where conditions for textile manufacturing seemed ideal. The immigrants from Brihuega played a crucial role in making Puebla the leading textile producer in New Spain, and they were otherwise active in the city's commercial-industrial sector as well. Although some immigrants penetrated the higher circles of poblano society and politics, for the most part they remained close to their entrepreneurial and artisanal origins. Closely associated through business, kinship, marital, and compadrazgo ties, and in residential patterns, the Brihuega immigrants in Puebla constituted a coherent and visible community. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants as a basis for analyzing society in Brihuega and Puebla, making direct comparisons between the two cities by examining such topics as mobility and settlement; politics and public life; economic activity; religious life; social relations; and marriage, family, and kinship. In tracing the socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional patterns of a town in Spain and a city in New Spain--in all their connections, continuities, and discontinuities--the book offers a new basis for understanding the process and implications of the transference of these patterns within the early modern Hispanic world.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-01-01:
A fascinating complement to historian Altman's earlier outstanding study Emigrants and Society: Extremadura and Spanish America in the Sixteenth Century (CH, Mar'90), this book focuses on a unique group of about 1,000 Spanish emigrants who left the New Castilian textile manufacturing center of Brihuega between roughly 1570 and 1620 and settled almost exclusively in Puebla, Mexico, helping to turn the city into the colony's most important textile producer. In analyzing why inhabitants of Brihuega emigrated, Altman provides a point-counterpoint discussion of Brihuega's and Puebla's economies, politics, local government, religious activities, marriage and family patterns and practices, and social relations. This sophisticated examination illuminates the experiences of ordinary, rather than exceptional, emigrants in a new environment. It highlights similarities and differences of life in Spain and the colonies and forcefully reminds the reader that most emigrants during the years covered went to the New World intending to reside there permanently and earn a livelihood using skills they brought with them. Based primarily on manuscript sources in Spain and Mexico, Transatlantic Ties is an essential addition to all college and university libraries. M. A. Burkholder; University of Missouri--St. Louis
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Ida Altman has written a book that both probes deeply the significance of tying together Iberian and American domains under a common Crown government and brilliantly demonstrates how the comparative history of the first global age ought to be approached.
"Ida Altman has written a book that both probes deeply the significance of tying together Iberian and American domains under a common Crown government and brilliantly demonstrates how the comparative history of the first global age ought to be approached. . . . Throughout well-organized and well-written chapters on economic, political, religious, and social life, the book underlines its methodological message: in order to understand the nature and impact of migration, researchers must focus on locality."Comparative Studies in Society and History
"Ida Altman has written a book that both probes deeply the significance of tying together Iberian and American domains under a common Crown government and brilliantly demonstrates how the comparative history of the first global age ought to be approached. . . . Throughout well-organized and well-written chapters on economic, political, religious, and social life, the book underlines its methodological message: in order to understand the nature and impact of migration, researchers must focus on locality."-- Comparative Studies in Society and History
"Ida Altman has written a book that both probes deeply the significance of tying together Iberian and American domains under a common Crown government and brilliantly demonstrates how the comparative history of the first global age ought to be approached. . . . Throughout well-organized and well-written chapters on economic, political, religious, and social life, the book underlines its methodological message: in order to understand the nature and impact of migration, researchers must focus on locality."--Comparative Studies in Society and History
"[The book] exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."International Migration Review
"The book exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."International Migration Review
"The book exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."-- International Migration Review
"The book exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."--International Migration Review
"The stories that Altman relates are revealing accounts of individual experiences in a transatlantic community."Hispanic American Historical Review
"The stories that Altman relates are revealing accounts of individual experiences in a transatlantic community."-- Hispanic American Historical Review
"The stories that Altman relates are revealing accounts of individual experiences in a transatlantic community."--Hispanic American Historical Review
"This superb case study of migration from a Spanish town to an emerging community in New Spain over a 60-year period has broad applicability and implications for the study of transatlantic migration in the early modern period." John Kicza, Washington State University
"This superb case study of migration from a Spanish town to an emerging community in New Spain over a 60-year period has broad applicability and implications for the study of transatlantic migration in the early modern period." --John Kicza, Washington State University
"With this monograph, Ida Altman completes her innovative conspectus of postconquest culture in specific regions of sixteenth-century Spain and New Spain, begun with her Emigrants and Society. . . . Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empirei
"With this monograph, Ida Altman completes her innovative conspectus of postconquest culture in specific regions of sixteenth-century Spain and New Spain, begun with her Emigrants and Society. . . . Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empireis ground level social history based on careful exploitation of manuscript materials, notably in repositories of Puebla and Mexico City, Seville, and Madrid."-- American Historical Review
"With this monograph, Ida Altman completes her innovative conspectus of postconquest culture in specific regions of sixteenth-century Spain and New Spain, begun with herEmigrants and Society. . . .Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empireis ground level social history based on careful exploitation of manuscript materials, notably in repositories of Puebla and Mexico City, Seville, and Madrid."--American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"This superb case study of migration from a Spanish town to an emerging community in New Spain over a 60-year period has broad applicability and implications for the study of transatlantic migration in the early modern period." John Kicza, Washington State University "[The book] exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."International Migration Review
Back Cover Copy
"This superb case study of migration from a Spanish town to an emerging community in New Spain over a 60-year period has broad applicability and implications for the study of transatlantic migration in the early modern period." --John Kicza, Washington State University "[The book] exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."--International Migration Review
Bowker Data Service Summary
Between 1560 and 1620, over 1000 people left Brihuega in Spain to migrate to Mexico, where most settled in Pueblo de los Angeles. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants to analyse society in Brihuega and Pueblo.
Main Description
Between 1560 and 1620, a thousand or more people left the town of Brihuega in Spain to migrate to New Spain (now Mexico), where nearly all of them settled in Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain's second most important city. A medium-sized community of about four thousand people, Brihuega had been a center of textile production since the Middle Ages, but in the latter part of the sixteenth century its industry was in decline--a circumstance that induced a significant number of its townspeople to emigrate to Puebla, where conditions for textile manufacturing seemed ideal. The immigrants from Brihuega played a crucial role in making Puebla the leading textile producer in New Spain, and they were otherwise active in the city's commercial-industrial sector as well. Although some immigrants penetrated the higher circles of poblanosociety and politics, for the most part they remained close to their entrepreneurial and artisanal origins. Closely associated through business, kinship, marital, and compadrazgoties, and in residential patterns, the Brihuega immigrants in Puebla constituted a coherent and visible community. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants as a basis for analyzing society in Brihuega and Puebla, making direct comparisons between the two cities by examining such topics as mobility and settlement; politics and public life; economic activity; religious life; social relations; and marriage, family, and kinship. In tracing the socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional patterns of a town in Spain and a city in New Spain--in all their connections, continuities, and discontinuities--the book offers a new basis for understanding the process and implications of the transference of these patterns within the early modern Hispanic world.
Main Description
Between 1560 and 1620, a thousand or more people left the town of Brihuega in Spain to migrate to New Spain (now Mexico), where nearly all of them settled in Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain's second most important city. A medium-sized community of about four thousand people, Brihuega had been a center of textile production since the Middle Ages, but in the latter part of the sixteenth century its industry was in decline--a circumstance that induced a significant number of its townspeople to emigrate to Puebla, where conditions for textile manufacturing seemed ideal. The immigrants from Brihuega played a crucial role in making Puebla the leading textile producer in New Spain, and they were otherwise active in the city's commercial-industrial sector as well. Although some immigrants penetrated the higher circles ofpoblanosociety and politics, for the most part they remained close to their entrepreneurial and artisanal origins. Closely associated through business, kinship, marital, andcompadrazgoties, and in residential patterns, the Brihuega immigrants in Puebla constituted a coherent and visible community. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants as a basis for analyzing society in Brihuega and Puebla, making direct comparisons between the two cities by examining such topics as mobility and settlement; politics and public life; economic activity; religious life; social relations; and marriage, family, and kinship. In tracing the socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional patterns of a town in Spain and a city in New Spain--in all their connections, continuities, and discontinuities--the book offers a new basis for understanding the process and implications of the transference of these patterns within the early modern Hispanic world.

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