Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The velvet glove : paternalism and conflict in gender, class, and race relations /
Mary R. Jackman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
description
xvi, 425 p.
ISBN
0520081137 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
isbn
0520081137 (cloth : alk. paper)
general note
"A centennial book"--P. ii.
catalogue key
377518
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"With an enviable elegance of prose, penetrating theoretical reasoning, and a careful analysis of truly well designed survey data,The Velvet Glovedelivers a powerful statement on the dynamics of race, class, and gender."--Lawrence Bobo, University of California, Los Angeles "An explosive, powerful book--laying bare the uselessness of individualism as a solution to today's racial problems, while simultaneously exposing its dominative origins."--Nancy Denton, State University of New York, Albany
Flap Copy
"With an enviable elegance of prose, penetrating theoretical reasoning, and a careful analysis of truly well designed survey data, The Velvet Glovedelivers a powerful statement on the dynamics of race, class, and gender."--Lawrence Bobo, University of California, Los Angeles "An explosive, powerful book--laying bare the uselessness of individualism as a solution to today's racial problems, while simultaneously exposing its dominative origins."--Nancy Denton, State University of New York, Albany
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-09:
Jackman, distinguished survey researcher, sociologist, and author with Robert Jackman of Class Awareness in the United States (CH, Nov'83), here explores how racial, gender, and class stratification are viewed by dominant and subordinate groups. Arguing from survey data that traditional social science views of hostility and conflict as the heart of oppressive relations are incorrect, she suggests that "velvet glove" ideologies are used as less openly hostile ways of rationalizing expropriation. Paternalism, in which dominant groups come to believe they "know best" for subordinate groups, is one major velvet-glove ideology. Even while exploiting subordinates, dominants may profess love and affection and give praise to their victims. Whether in male-female, black-white, or employer-worker relations, paternalistic ideologies surround actions seen by dominants as benevolent. There is much that is original in this book, but it is limited by a too heavy reliance on one research data set for the year 1975. In addition to being somewhat dated, the findings are based on very short answers to short questions and do not lend themselves well to the intensive, probing, and philosophical analysis Jackman attempts. Excellent bibliography and footnotes. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. R. Feagin; University of Florida
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This landmark study analyzes and compares the ideologies that develop among unequal social groups. Mary Jackman employs a unique national survey to investigate all three of the most prominent relations of inequality in the United States: gender, class, and race. Where other scholars have emphasized conflict as the emblem of intergroup oppression, Jackman proposes a theory in which both dominant and subordinate groups maneuver to avoid open hostility as they strive to control resources within the confines of their mutual relationship. Hostility, Jackman points out, creates resistance in a relationship. Dominant groups therefore try to preempt the use of force by following a velvet-glove strategy of "sweet persuasion." They are drawn especially to the ideological mold of paternalism, in which the coercion of subordinates is grounded in love rather than hate. Dominant-group members pronounce authoritatively on the needs and welfare of all and then profess to "provide" for those needs. Love, affection, and praise are offered to subordinates on strict condition that they comply with the terms of the unequal relationship. Whether in the home or in the arena of class or race relations, paternalism wraps control and authority in an ideological cocoon in which discriminatory actions are defined as benevolent and affection is made contingent on compliance. Jackman's emphasis on the practice of coercive love in race, class, and gender relations is sure to generate controversy and further research. Sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, and anyone interested in group ideology will find here a provocative challenge to conventional views.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Prologuep. 1
The Expropriative Basis of Social Inequalityp. 2
The Pursuit of Resourcesp. 3
Long-term Relations of Social Inequalityp. 5
The Ideological Pressures of Long-term Inequalitiesp. 7
The Sweetest Persuasion: Paternalismp. 9
Paternalism versus Benevolencep. 11
Mastering the Illusion of Benevolencep. 14
The Wages of Lovep. 15
Outline of the Bookp. 16
The Wind and the Sun
The Search for Conflictp. 23
Class and Class Conflictp. 24
Racial Prejudice as Irrational Antagonismp. 33
Political Tolerance as Hostility Defusedp. 43
Gender Relations as Hostility Revealedp. 47
Ideology and Social Controlp. 59
The Limits of Forcep. 61
Implicit Power and Ideologyp. 64
Coercive Love and Reasoned Persuasionp. 71
Three Cases of Inequality
Expressions of Inequality: Class, Race, Genderp. 97
The Three Cases: Definitional Parametersp. 97
A Comparative Case-Study Analysisp. 111
The Structure of Intergroup Contactp. 127
Role Segregation and Spatial Segregationp. 127
Data: Intergroup Contact in the Three Casesp. 138
Dialogues of Dominance and Subordination
Intergroup Feelings and the Definition of Group Interestsp. 167
The Issuesp. 168
Data: Intergroup Feelingsp. 182
Data: The Definition of Group Interestsp. 197
The Articulation of Policy Goalsp. 208
The Issuesp. 209
Data: Abstract Policy Principlesp. 228
Data: Specific Policy Goalsp. 238
The Ideological Molds of Paternalism and Conflictp. 261
The Issuesp. 263
Datap. 273
The Cognitive Embroidery of Intergroup Relationsp. 296
The Issuesp. 298
Data: Trait Attribution to Groupsp. 321
Data: Popular Explanations of Group Differencesp. 338
Threads of Paternalism and Conflict
Ideology and Coercionp. 353
The Politics of Intergroup Ideologyp. 358
Strategy of Inquiryp. 366
The Pattern of Evidencep. 371
Love and Enmityp. 382
Referencesp. 385
Subject Indexp. 409
Author Indexp. 419
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem