Catalogue


Quasi-democracy? : parties and leadership selection in Alberta /
David K. Stewart and Keith Archer.
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2000.
description
xiii, 194 p.
ISBN
0774807903
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2000.
isbn
0774807903
catalogue key
3770479
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Keith Archer is Professor of Political Science and Associate Vice-President (Research) at the University of Calgary.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-06-01:
Historically a province of radical political movements since the end of the WW I--featuring the Ginger Group of the Progressive Movement and then Social Credit--and notable for longevity in office first of Social Credit and then the Conservatives, Alberta has been characterized by what the late C.H. Macpherson called "a quasi party system" (Democracy in Alberta, 1953). This interesting albeit specialized analysis by political scientists of the political parties and how they chose their leaders in Alberta in the 1990s is based on surveys of voters to the 1992 Progressive Conservative, the 1994 NDP, and the 1994 Liberal Party leadership elections. It moves the story forward by analyzing three different contexts: direct election of Conservative and Liberal party leaders by the party membership, electronic over the telephone elections among the latter, and a typical convention held by the NDP. Although it is difficult to extrapolate from events in Alberta to the rest of Canada or to other political systems, the study does evaluate the implications of different leadership selection methodologies for representation. Of interest to students of party politics, comparative government, and Canadianists. All levels. P. Regenstreif University of Rochester
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2000
Choice, June 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
In Quasi-Democracy? David Stewart and Keith Archer examinepolitical parties and leadership selection in Alberta using mail-backsurveys administered to voters who participated in the Conservative,Liberal, and NDP leadership conventions elections of the 1990s.Leadership selection events, they contend, provide rare opportunitiesfor observing the internal workings of the parties and people who"stand between the politicians and the electorate."
Main Description
In Quasi-Democracy?David Stewart and Keith Archer examine political parties and leadership selection in Alberta using mail-back surveys administered to voters who participated in the Conservative, Liberal, and NDP leadership conventions elections of the 1990s. Leadership selection events, they contend, provide rare opportunities for observing the internal workings of the parties and people who "stand between the politicians and the electorate."
Long Description
Many Canadian parties are shifting their process for selectingleaders from delegate conventions to methods that -- at least in theory-- allow all members to vote for the leader. In the leadershipselections of the 1990s, Alberta's governing Conservatives used aprimary balloting system, the opposition Liberal Party allowed membersto vote by phone, and the NDP held a traditional leadershipconvention. In Quasi-Democracy? David Stewart and Keith Archer examinepolitical parties and leadership selection in Alberta using mail-backsurveys administered to voters who participated in the Conservative,Liberal, and NDP leadership conventions elections of the 1990s.Leadership selection events, they contend, provide rare opportunitiesfor observing the internal workings of the parties and people who"stand between the politicians and the electorate." Usingparticipant accounts and material from the press media, the authorsanalyze the factors that influence leadership selection in each party,develop attitudinal profiles of the supporters of the parties, andexamine the party activists with respect to their backgrounds inprovincial and federal politics. Quasi-Democracy? will beinvaluable reading for students and scholars of party democracy andrepresentation, and for those interested in the intricate machinationsof the political process in Alberta.
Table of Contents
Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Party Democracy in Albertap. 3
The "United Right"? Lessons from the 1992 PC Leadership Electionp. 22
Electing the Premierp. 49
Electronic Fiasco: The 1994 Liberal Tele-Votep. 68
A Party of "Communities"? The 1994 NDP Leadership Conventionp. 95
Gender Differences among Party Activistsp. 115
Democracy, Representation, and the Selection of Party Leadersp. 136
Quasi-Democracy? Lessons from Albertap. 163
Appendicesp. 174
Notesp. 177
Referencesp. 186
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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