Catalogue


The idea of the clerisy in the nineteenth century /
Ben Knights.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1978.
description
ix, 274 p.
ISBN
0521217989 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1978.
isbn
0521217989 :
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3755867
 
Bibliography: p. 260-269.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This book is about the development in nineteenth-century England of the idea of a secular intellectual elite - the 'clerisy'. These intellectuals wanted to free themselves from the pressures of material conditioning and be in touch with transcendent values. This elite would be capable of seeing and valuing the best in the national cultural heritage and raising the standard of intellectual life. Dr Knights considers five major writers who shared this concern: Coleridge, Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, J. S. Mill and J. H. Newman. He finds important similarities, arising out of shared problems and assumptions. The status of literary culture was still such that to many of its practitioners a 'clerisy' offered the only hope of reversing a trend towards cultural and social disintegration. Dr Knights goes on to examine the influence of the idea upon the reorganisation of university curricula in the latter part of the century.
Description for Bookstore
This book is about the development in nineteenth-century England of the idea of a secular intellectual elite - the 'clerisy'. These intellectuals wanted to be in touch with transcendent values and raise the standard of intellectual life. Dr Knights examines five major writers that have important similarities, arising out of shared feelings on the subject of intellectual values.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
The idea of the clerisy
The hero as man of letters
The majority and the remnant
The reconstruction of opinion
The idea of a university
Epilogue: cultural studies without a clerisy
Notes
Select bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem