Catalogue


Representations of the self from the Renaissance to Romanticism /
edited by Patrick Coleman, Jayne Lewis, and Jill Kowalik.
imprint
Cambridge, UK. : New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
description
xii, 284 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521661463 hardback
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK. : New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
isbn
0521661463 hardback
catalogue key
3737737
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-12-01:
Coleman, Lewis, and Kowalik have gathered essays dealing with "life-writing"--biography, autobiography, correspondence, etc.--by writers from the early 17th century through the end of the 18th century. The introduction claims a unity for the essays in that they recover the subjectivity of writers at the same time they enact the postmodernist project of casting suspicion on the Enlightenment ideal of the autonomous self as a cultural ideal. Fortunately, the essays are much more interesting than a rehash of that postmodernist project, for they offer cultural-historical readings that bring to life figures like the English writer Mary Robinson and Madame de Warens, who is at the center of Rousseau's Confessions. In fact, there is little that unifies the essays--unless it is the contributors' common belief that they are revising received critical opinion. Specialists may be dubious about that, but graduate students may find some useful insights here for, say, the origins of Descartes's thought in his education, Diderot's self-presentation in Le neveu de Rameau, or Fichte's struggle with his Protestant background before he came to revise Kantian thought. For graduate collections in literature, art history, and cultural history; much of the writing is too technical (and turgid) for undergraduates and general readers. A. Thiher; University of Missouri--Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
"a valuable volume." Eighteenth Century Fiction
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2000
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring the way modern conceptions of what constitutes an individual's life story emerged in the 17th and 18th century, this collection of essays analyses early modern 'life writing' in all its variety.
Description for Bookstore
In this volume a team of international contributors explore the history of early-modern autobiography in all its variety, from private diaries and correspondences to public confessions and philosophical portraits. The book spans a period from 1600 to 1800 in which the explosion of print culture afforded unprecedented opportunies for 'life-writing'.
Description for Bookstore
In this volume a team of international contributors explore the way modern conceptions of what constitutes an individual's life-story emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. The Enlightenment idea of the self--an autonomous individual, testing rules imposed from without against a personal sensibility nourished from within--is today vigorously contested. By analysing early-modern 'life writing' in all its variety, from private diaries and correspondences to public confessions and philosophical portraits, this volume shows that the relation between self and community is more complex and more intimate than supposed.
Description for Bookstore
Spanning the period from the end of the Renaissance to the eve of Romanticism in western Europe, a period in which the explosion of print culture afforded unprecedented opportunities for the circulation of life-stories from all classes, this book examines the public assertion of self by men and women in England, France and Germany from the Renaissance to Romanticism.
Description for Library
In this volume a team of international contributors explore the way modern conceptions of what constitutes an individual's life-story emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. The Enlightenment idea of the self - an autonomous individual, testing rules imposed from without against a personal sensibility nourished from within - is today vigorously contested. By analysing early-modern 'life writing' in all its variety, from private diaries and correspondences to public confessions and philosophical portraits, this volume shows that the relation between self and community is more complex and more intimate than supposed.
Main Description
A team of international contributors explores the way modern conceptions of what constitutes an individual's life story emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Enlightenment idea of the self--an autonomous individual, testing rules imposed from without against a personal sensibility nourished from within--is today vigorously contested. By analyzing early-modern "life writing" in all its variety, from private diaries and correspondences to public confessions and philosophical portraits, this volume shows that the relation between self and community is more complex and more intimate than supposed.
Main Description
In this volume a team of international contributors explore the way modern conceptions of what constitutes an individual's life-story emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Enlightenment idea of the self - an autonomous individual, testing rules imposed from without against a personal sensibility nourished from within - is today vigourously contested. By analysing early modern 'life writing' in all its variety, from private diaries and correspondence to public confessions and philosophical portraits, this volume shows that the relation between self and community is more complex and more intimate than supposed. Spanning the period from the end of the Renaissance to the eve of Romanticism in western Europe, a period in which the explosion of print culture afforded unprecedented opportunities for the circulation of life-stories from all classes, this book examines the public assertion of self by men and women in England, France and Germany from the Renaissance to Romanticism.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vii
List of contributorsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: life-writing and the legitimation of the modern selfp. 1
Revising Descartes: on subject and communityp. 16
The "man of learning" defended: seventeenth-century biographies of scholars and an early modern ideal of excellencep. 39
Life-writing in seventeenth-century Englandp. 63
Representations of intimacy in the life-writing of Anne Clifford and Anne Dormerp. 79
Gender, genre, and theatricality in the autobiography of Charlotte Charkep. 97
Petrarch/Sade: writing the lifep. 117
A comic life: Diderot and le recit de viep. 135
Letters, diary, and autobiography in eighteenth-century Francep. 151
Portrait of the object of love in Rousseau's Confessionsp. 171
Fichte's road to Kantp. 200
Mary Robinson and the scripts of female sexualityp. 230
After Sir Joshuap. 260
Indexp. 280
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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