Catalogue


Letters home : Henry Matrau of the Iron Brigade /
edited by Marcia Reid-Green ; foreword by Reid Mitchell.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1993.
description
xvii, 166 p., [4] p. of plates : ill., map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803231512 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1993.
isbn
0803231512 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3701696
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 149-153) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
"A must buy for specialists and anyone interested in the Army of the Potomac, the war in the east, or human courage."-Civil War History. "A well-edited, comprehensively annotated personal and heartfelt account of one volunteer's service, exemplifying patterns common to the majority of foot soldiers while nevertheless demonstrating Matrau's unique individualism."-Society of Civil War Historians Newsletter. "A must for all admirers of that stellar combat unit . . . especially important because of its information on the 1864-65 Virginia campaigns, which are given short shrift in other books on the Iron Brigade."-Civil War. "A remarkable testament to the endurance and tenacity of [a] young man . . . an outstanding anthology of Civil War letters."-Wisconsin Magazine of History. This volume comprises sixty-three previously unpublished letters from a young Civil War soldier to his family in Bainbridge Township, Michigan, written while he served in the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, one of the units of the acclaimed "Iron Brigade." Only sixteen when he joined the Union army in 1861, Henry Matrau survived to describe the anxiety and discomfort of camp life and the sheer terror of combat. Henry Matrau's letters were edited by his great-granddaughter, Marcia Reid-Green, who lives in Pennington, New Jersey.
Main Description
This volume comprises sixty-three previously unpublished letters from a young Civil War soldier to his family in Bainbridge Township, Michigan, written while he served in the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, one of the units of the acclaimed "Iron Brigade." Only sixteen when he joined the Union army in 1861, Henry Matrau rose to the rank of captain during his four years of wartime service. He took part in many of the major engagements of the war: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and the siege of Petersburg. In his letters, Matrau describes camp lifethe food, uniforms and equipment, reading materials, and medical care available to him and his comrades. Other incidents recounted include the capture and transfer of "contraband" slaves, the execution of a Union army deserter, friendly exchanges between Union and Confederate soldiers on picket, and tours of Richmond's Libby and Castle Thunder prisons after the war. These letters reflect Matrau's maturing as a soldier, from his youthful enthusiasm early in 1862 when he boasts of becoming proficient with a bayonet, to the combat-weary, veteran fighter who admits in spring 1863 that he has "seen the elephant" and is ready to come home.
Main Description
This volume comprises sixty-three previously unpublished letters from a young Civil War soldier to his family Bainbridge Township, Michigan, written while he served in the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, one of the units of the acclaimed 'Iron Brigade.'
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
Prefacep. xv
Letters of July 22, 1861, to February 27, 1862p. 1
Letters of March 28, 1862, to September 27, 1862p. 23
Letters of December 10, 1862, to April 3, 1863p. 35
Letters of May 1, 1863, to September 17, 1863p. 49
Letters of October 22, 1863, to June 26, 1864p. 65
Letters of July 25, 1864, to February 3, 1865p. 83
Letters of February 13, 1865, to July 23, 1865p. 105
Epiloguep. 127
Who's Who in Henry's Lettersp. 129
Notesp. 149
Indexp. 155
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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