Catalogue


Hopi Coyote tales = Istutuwutsi /
Ekkehart Malotki, Michael Lomatuway'ma ; illustrations by Anne-Marie Malotki.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1984]
description
viii, 343 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803230885 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0803281234 (pbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1984]
isbn
0803230885 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0803281234 (pbk)
catalogue key
3693899
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ekkehart Malotki, is a language scholar at Northern Arizona University. Lomatuway'ma is a Third Mesa Hopi from Hotevilla and a library assistant at Northern Arizona
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1985-09:
Native American ``trickster'' figures have been of interest to students of myth and consciousness at least since 1956 when Paul Radin's pioneering work The Trickster: A Study in American Indian Mythology and C.G. Jung's essay ``On the Psychology of the Trickster Figure'' both appeared. Gary Snyder's 1977 essay, ``The Incredible Survival of Coyote,'' suggests that the trickster, particularly in his western incarnation as Coyote, is far from dead and buried but instead experiencing something of a resurgence in the works of poets seeking an American mythopoeia or a deeper relationship to place. These two volumes present readers with a Coyote who, like the Eastern Woodland and Northwest Coast trickster archetypes gathered by Radin, is a boundless figures often embodying simultaneously dualities like good and evil, animal and human, demon and divine. Coyote's status level shifts sharply from story to story and sometimes within stories. According to Karl W. Luckert's introduction to these companion volumes, ``Coyote is excrement-imitator-trickster-witch-hero-savior-god.'' Luckert actually graphs Coyote's configurations in the stories on a scale of possibilities ranging from less than human to greater than human. He establishes that Coyote was most often sucker rather than savior, that his comic and bumbling persona dominates these tales, particularly among the Hopi. Of the two volumes, the collection of Hopi stories by Malotki and Lomatuway'ma is by far the more readable. The tales are told straightforwardly, conversationally, with heart. Haile's transcriptions of Curly T;o Aheedliinii's versions, on the other hand, tend to be clumsily written in abstract, seemingly sanitizes language whose narrative thread too often gets twisted, tangled, or broken. Nevertheless, both collections are valuable contributions to scholarship and knowledge. General, undergraduate, and graduate readership. Essential for university libraries.-M. Castro, Lindewood College
Summaries
Main Description
This volume brings together twenty-one traditional tales recently retold by Hopi narrators. Complete with English translations and original Hopi transcriptions on facing pages and a bilingual glossary. Hopi Coyote Talesis important to an understanding of the Hopi language and folklore. To nomadic hunters such as the Navajo, who competed with him on the open range, Coyote was by turns a formidable trickster, a demonic witchperson, and a god. As sedentary planters, the Hopis tended to reduce Coyote to the level of a laughable fool. In these tales Coyote is a friendly bumbler whose mistakes teach listeners what tricks to avoid. Time after time he is hurt or killed for failing to understand a situation correctly. The collection is as amusing as animal fables should be, as simply told, and as instructive. Published as a companion volume to Father Berard Haile's Navajo Coyote Tales, Hopi Coyote Talesis a valuable contribution to cross-cultural studies.
Main Description
This volume brings together twenty-one traditional tales recently retold by Hopi narrators. Complete with English translations and original Hopi transcriptions on facing pages and a bilingual glossary.Hopi Coyote Talesis important to an understanding of the Hopi language and folklore. To nomadic hunters such as the Navajo, who competed with him on the open range, Coyote was by turns a formidable trickster, a demonic witchperson, and a god. As sedentary planters, the Hopis tended to reduce Coyote to the level of a laughable fool. In these tales Coyote is a friendly bumbler whose mistakes teach listeners what tricks to avoid. Time after time he is hurt or killed for failing to understand a situation correctly. The collection is as amusing as animal fables should be, as simply told, and as instructive. Published as a companion volume to Father Berard Haile'sNavajo Coyote Tales,Hopi Coyote Talesis a valuable contribution to cross-cultural studies.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vi
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Coyote and Porcupinep. 3
Coyote and Water Serpentp. 9
Coyote and Badgerp. 23
Coyote and the Spidersp. 43
Coyote and Wrenp. 57
Coyote and the Blue Jaysp. 63
Coyote and Crowp. 69
Coyote and the Turkeysp. 77
Coyote and Little Birdp. 83
Coyote and the Bird Girlsp. 91
Coyote and Grasshopperp. 99
Coyote and Cicadap. 105
Coyote and the Cowboyp. 113
Coyote and the Navajop. 119
Coyote on a Salt Expeditionp. 127
Coyote and Pavayoykyasip. 141
The Coyote Chainp. 151
Coyote Learns Sorceryp. 161
Coyote and the So'yoko Ogrep. 179
Coyote and the Korowiste Kachinasp. 195
Coyote Boy Marries a Girl from Musangnuvip. 229
Glossaryp. 285
The Hopi Alphabetp. 340
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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