Catalogue


Ordinary people, extraordinary lives : a pictorial history of working people in New York City /
Debra E. Bernhardt and Rachel Bernstein.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2000.
description
xiv, 221 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN
0814798667 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2000.
isbn
0814798667 (alk. paper)
general note
"A Project of the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University."
catalogue key
3693438
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Debra E. Bernhardt is director of the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University's division of libraries.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This superb study glimpses the diverse traditions that immigrants brought with them from abroad, and the solidarity, diversity, struggles, and relief they found in their new homes and neighborhoods of New York." -DoubleTake
( "Are they needed? To be sure. The Darwinian industry, industrious though it is, has failed to provide texts of more than a handful of Darwin's books. If you want to know what Darwin said about barnacles (still an essential reference to cirripedists, apart from any historical importance) you are forced to search shelves, or wait while someone does it for you; some have been in print for a century; various reprints have appeared and since vanished." )-(Eric Korn),( Times Literary Supplement )
"This superb study glimpses the diverse traditions that immigrants brought with them from abroad, and the solidarity, diversity, struggles, and relief they found in their new homes and neighborhoods of New York."
"This superb study glimpses the diverse traditions that immigrants brought with them from abroad, and the solidarity, diversity, struggles, and relief they found in their new homes and neighborhoods of New York." - DoubleTake
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This pictorial history is a lavishly illustrated portfolio of New York City's workers and the marvels they built. Astounding in their own right, the photographs are complemented by poignant oral histories that tell the stories behind the images.
Publisher Fact Sheet
This pictorial history brings to life--in poignant oral histories & fascinating, little-seen images--the breathtaking & often heartbreaking stories of the workers who, with cement & steel, needle & thread, blood, sweat & dreams, built New York City in the twentieth century.
Main Description
This superb study glimpses the diverse traditions that immigrants brought with them from abroad, and the solidarity, diversity, struggles, and relief they found in their new homes and neighborhoods of New York.--DoubleTake Companion website: http://www.nyupress.nyu.edu/labor/index.htmlThis pictorial history brings to life the breathtaking and often heartbreaking stories of the workers who, with cement and steel, needle and thread, blood, sweat and dreams, built New York City in the twentieth century.Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives tells the stories of the men and women who built the city--of towering structures and the beam walkers who assembled them; of immigrant youths in factories and women in sweatshops; of longshoremen and typewriter girls; of dock workers and captains of industry. It provides a glimpse of the traditions they carried with them to this country and how they helped create new ones, in the form of labor organizations that provided recent immigrants, often overwhelmed by the intensity of New York life, with a sense of solidarity and security.Astounding in their own right, the book's photographic images, most drawn from seldom-seen labor movement photographers, are complemented by poignant oral histories, which tell the stories behind the images. Among the extraordinary lives chronicled are those of Philip Keating, who, seven years after a fellow worker photographed him painting the Queensboro Bridge in 1949, plunged to his death from another worksite; William Atkinson, who broke the color bar at Macy's and tells of fighting racism at home after fighting fascism abroad during World War II; and Cynthia Long, who fought gender barriers to become, in the late 1970s, an electrician with International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 3.With narratives at the beginning of each section providing historical context, this book brings the past clearly, emotionally, and fascinatingly alive.
Main Description
This pictorial history brings to life the breathtaking and often heartbreaking stories of the men and women who, with cement and steel, needle and thread, blood, sweat, and dreams, built New York City in the twentieth century.
Main Description
Companion website:http://www.nyupress.nyu.edu/labor/index.html This pictorial history brings to life the breathtaking and often heartbreaking stories of the workers who, with cement and steel, needle and thread, blood, sweat and dreams, built New York City in the twentieth century. Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives tells the stories of the men and women who built the city--of towering structures and the beam walkers who assembled them; of immigrant youths in factories and women in sweatshops; of longshoremen and typewriter girls; of dock workers and captains of industry. It provides a glimpse of the traditions they carried with them to this country and how they helped create new ones, in the form of labor organizations that provided recent immigrants, often overwhelmed by the intensity of New York life, with a sense of solidarity and security. Astounding in their own right, the book's photographic images, most drawn from seldom-seen labor movement photographers, are complemented by poignant oral histories, which tell the stories behind the images. Among the extraordinary lives chronicled are those of Philip Keating, who, seven years after a fellow worker photographed him painting the Queensboro Bridge in 1949, plunged to his death from another worksite; William Atkinson, who broke the color bar at Macy's and tells of fighting racism at home after fighting fascism abroad during World War II; and Cynthia Long, who fought gender barriers to become, in the late 1970s, an electrician with International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 3. With narratives at the beginning of each section providing historical context, this book brings the past clearly, emotionally, and fascinatingly alive.
Main Description
Companion website: http://www.nyupress.nyu.edu/labor/index.htmlThis pictorial history brings to life the breathtaking and often heartbreaking stories of the workers who, with cement and steel, needle and thread, blood, sweat and dreams, built New York City in the twentieth century.Ordinary People, Extraordinary Livestells the stories of the men and women who built the city--of towering structures and the beam walkers who assembled them; of immigrant youths in factories and women in sweatshops; of longshoremen and typewriter girls; of dock workers and captains of industry. It provides a glimpse of the traditions they carried with them to this country and how they helped create new ones, in the form of labor organizations that provided recent immigrants, often overwhelmed by the intensity of New York life, with a sense of solidarity and security.Astounding in their own right, the book's photographic images, most drawn from seldom-seen labor movement photographers, are complemented by poignant oral histories, which tell the stories behind the images. Among the extraordinary lives chronicled are those of Philip Keating, who, seven years after a fellow worker photographed him painting the Queensboro Bridge in 1949, plunged to his death from another worksite; William Atkinson, who broke the color bar at Macy's and tells of fighting racism at home after fighting fascism abroad during World War II; and Cynthia Long, who fought gender barriers to become, in the late 1970s, an electrician with International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 3.With narratives at the beginning of each section providing historical context, this book brings the past clearly, emotionally, and fascinatingly alive.
Main Description
Charles Robert Darwin (18091882) has been widely recognized since his own time as one of the most influential writers in the history of Western thought. His books were widely read by specialists and the general public, and his influence had been extended by almost continuous public debate over the past 150 years. New York University Press's new paperback edition makes it possible to review Darwin's public literary output as a whole, plus his scientific journal articles, his private notebooks, and his correspondence. This is complete edition contains all of Darwin's published books, featuring definitive texts recording original pagination with Darwin's indexes retained. The set also features a general introduction and index, and introductions to each volume.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
New Yorkers at Work: Building the Cityp. 11
New Yorkers at Work: Faces of a Changing Economyp. 43
Creating a Culture of Solidarity: The Cradle of the Labor Movementp. 91
Rebuilding a Culture of Solidarityp. 145
New York Labor Enters the Twenty-first Centuryp. 181
Afterwordp. 191
A Timeline of New York City Labor Historyp. 193
Suggestions for Further Readingp. 207
Sourcesp. 209
Indexp. 211
About the Authorsp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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