Catalogue


Americanization and its limits : reworking US technology and management in post-war Europe and Japan /
edited by Jonathan Zeitlin and Gary Herrigel.
imprint
Oxford, UK .; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xvi, 410 p. : ill.
ISBN
0198295553
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford, UK .; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198295553
general note
Selected and revised proceedings of two workshops.
catalogue key
3673855
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A major addition to [the] literature ... this book is a major enrichment of our understanding of 'Americanization', combining a rich array of new research with a rigorous attention to problems of conceptualization.
'The detailed essays provide some fascinating examples of transatlantic interaction.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
'The detailed essays provide some fascinating examples of transatlanticinteraction.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
The detailed essays provide some fascinating examples of transatlantic interaction ... this is an important book bringing together for the first time a great deal of useful information.
This book is essential reading for anyone interested in post-war international economic history and the development of an internationalized business culture. It also provides a salutary reminder about the limited prospects of a national business model being transferred wholesale even in the era of the new economy and revived American dominance.
'...this book is the best by far of the recent spate of studies of Americanization, and it will be invaluable to scholars and students in a variety of fields.'Dr Raymond Stokes, University of Glasgow - Technology and Culture, Vol.42
'this book is the best by far of the recent spate of studies of Americanization, and it will be invaluable to scholars and students in a variety of fields.'Dr Raymond Stokes, University of Glasgow - Technology and Culture, Vol.42
'this book is the best by far of the recent spate of studies ofAmericanization, and it will be invaluable to scholars and students in a varietyof fields.'Dr Raymond Stokes, University of Glasgow - Technology and Culture, Vol.42
This book will be of great value to economic as well as business historians, particularly those with an interest in the development of globalization ... the project is truly international in its scholarly dimensions.
'...this is an important book bringing together for the first time a great deal of useful information.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
'this is an important book bringing together for the first time a great deal of useful information.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
'this is an important book bringing together for the first time a greatdeal of useful information.'History, vol. 86, no. 284
Jonathan Zeitlin: Chapter 1: Introduction: Americanization and Its Limits: Reworking US Technology and Management in Post-War Europe and Japan Part I: Exporting the American Model? Jacqueline McGlade: Chapter 2: Americanization: Ideology or Process? The Case of the US Technical Assistance and Productivity Program Steven Tolliday: Chapter 3: Transplanting the American Model? US Automobile Companies and the Transfer of Technology and Management to Europe after the Second World War Part II: Reworking US Technology and Management: National, Sectoral, and Firm-Level Variations A: Britain and Sweden Jonathan Zeitlin: Chapter 4: Americanizing British Engineering? Strategic Debate, Selective Adaptation, and Hybrid Innovation in Post-War Reconstruction Kenneth Lipartito: Chapter 5: Failure to Communicate: British Telecommunications and the American Lesson Henrik Glimstedt: Chapter 6: Creative Cross-Fertilization and Uneven Americanization of Swedish Industry: Sources of Innovation in Post-War Motor Vehicles and Electrical Manufacturing B: France and Italy Matthias Kipping: Chapter 7: A Slow and Difficult Process: The Americanization of the French Steel Producing and Using Industries after World War II Ruggero Ranieri: Chapter 8: Remodelling the Italian Steel Industry: Americanization, Modernization, and Mass Production Duccio Bigazzi: Chapter 9: Mass Production or 'Organized Craftsmanship'? The Post-War Italian Automobile Industry C: Germany and Japan Paul Erker: Chapter 10: The Long Shadow of Americanization: The German Rubber Industry and the Radial Tire Revolution Kazuo Wada and Takao Shiba: Chapter 11: The Evolution of the 'Japanese Production System': Indigenous Influences and American Impact Gary Herrigel: Chapter 12: American Occupation, Market Order, and Democracy: Reconfiguring the Japanese and German Steel Industries after World War II
'this is an important book bringing together for the first time a great deal of useful information.'History, vol. 86, no. 284'The detailed essays provide some fascinating examples of transatlantic interaction.'History, vol. 86, no. 284'this book is the best by far of the recent spate of studies of Americanization, and it will be invaluable to scholars and students in a variety of fields.'Dr Raymond Stokes, University of Glasgow - Technology and Culture, Vol.42
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this analysis of Americanization in European and Japanese industry after WW2, the contributors explore the creative role of local actors in selectively adapting US technology and management to suit local conditions.
Long Description
This book develops a new and conceptually distinctive analysis of Americanization in European and Japanese industry after the Second World War, based on a rich set of sectoral and firm-based studies by an international group of distinguished scholars. The authors highlight the autonomous and creative role of local actors in selectively adapting US technology and management methods to suit local conditions and, strikingly, in creating new hybrid forms that combined indigenous and foreign practices in unforeseen and often remarkably competitive ways. Their findings will be of compelling interest not only to historians and social scientists concerned with the dynamics of post-war economic growth and industrial development, but also to those engaged in contemporary debates about the cross-national transfer and diffusion of productive models.
Main Description
'A major addition to [the] literature... this book is a major enrichment of our understanding of 'Americanization', combining a rich array of new research with a rigourous attention to problems of conceptualization.' -The Historical Journal'This book is essential reading for anyone interested in post-war international economic history and the development of an internationalized business culture. It also provides a salutary reminder about the limited prospects of a national business model being transferred wholesale even in the era of the new economy and revived American dominance.' -English Historical Review'This book will be of great value to economic as well as business historians, particularly those with an interest in the development of globalization... the project is truly international in its scholarly dimensions.' -English Historical Review'The detailed essays provide some fascinating examples of transatlantic interaction... this is an important book bringing together for the first time a great deal of useful information.' -History'This book is the best by far of the recent spate of studies of Americanization, and it will be invaluable to scholars and students in a variety of fields.' -Technology and CultureA new and distinctive analysis of Americanization in European and Japanese industry after the Second World War. The distinguished international contributors analyse the autonomous and creative role of local actors in selectively adapting US technology and management methods to suit local conditions and, strikingly, in creating new hybrid forms that combined indigenous and foreign practices in unforeseen, yet remarkably competitive ways. Of compelling interest in particular to historians and social scientists concerned with the dynamics of post-war economic growth and industrial development.
Main Description
This book develops a new and conceptually distinctive analysis of Americanization in European and Japanese industry after the Second World War, based on a rich set of sectoral and firm-based studies by an international group of distinguished scholars. The authors highlight the autonomous andcreative role of local actors in selectively adapting US technology and management methods to suit local conditions and, strikingly, in creating new hybrid forms that combined indigenous and foreign practices in unforeseen and often remarkably competitive ways. Their findings will be of compelling interest not only to historians and social scientists concerned with the dynamics of post-war economic growth and industrial development, but also to those engaged in contemporary debates about the cross-national transfer and diffusion of productivemodels.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Americanization and Its Limits: Reworking US Technology and Management in Post-War Europe and Japan
Exporting the American Model?
Americanization: Ideology or Process? The Case of the US Technical Assistance and Productivity Program
Transplanting the American Model? US Automobile Companies and the Transfer of Technology and Management to Europe after the Second World War
Reworking US Technology and Management: National, Sectoral, and Firm-Level Variations
Britain and Sweden
Americanizing British Engineering? Strategic Debate, Selective Adaptation, and Hybrid Innovation in Post-War Reconstruction
Failure to Communicate: British Telecommunications and the American Lesson
Creative Cross-Fertilization and Uneven Americanization of Swedish Industry: Sources of Innovation in Post-War Motor Vehicles and Electrical Manufacturing
France and Italy
A Slow and Difficult Process: The Americanization of the French Steel Producing and Using Industries after World War II
Remodelling the Italian Steel Industry: Americanization, Modernization, and Mass Production
Mass Production or 'Organized Craftsmanship'? The Post-War Italian Automobile Industry
Germany and Japan
The Long Shadow of Americanization: The German Rubber Industry and the Radial Tire Revolution
The Evolution of the 'Japanese Production System': Indigenous Influences and American Impact
American Occupation, Market Order, and Democracy: Reconfiguring the Japanese and German Steel Industries after World War II
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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