Catalogue


A higher duty : desertion among Georgia troops during the Civil War /
Mark A. Weitz.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2000.
description
x, 227 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0803247915 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2000.
isbn
0803247915 (cl : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3663631
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark A. Weitz is an independent Civil War scholar.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-09-01:
Using Georgia as a case study, Weitz offers a revisionist approach to standard interpretations of Confederate desertion patterns. The author challenges the earlier views of Ella Lonn and Bessie Martin, which focused on higher numbers in the final months of the Civil War and economic factors that produced greater than normal rates of desertion. Rather than relying solely on official records for statistical data, Weitz drew more reliable data from the "Register of Confederate Deserters," housed in the National Archives. The latter source made an important distinction between bona fide deserters and the larger number of soldiers who merely were guilty of "temporary unauthorized absence." Many of these became briefly separated from their units in the aftermath of chaotic battles, were taken prisoner, or were wounded and left behind by their advancing regiments. Weitz also addresses the soldiers who answered a "higher duty" than mere loyalty to the South. These Georgia veterans, though fiercely patriotic, increasingly began to go home to protect their families after Union forces breached and occupied part of their state in 1864. Some ultimately returned to their units, but many more realized that the cause was lost. Thus, commitment to family rather than broader loyalties to regional pride was the greater motivator. All levels. M. L. Tate; University of Nebraska at Omaha
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...an authoritative, impressive work. Well researched and convincingly argues,Higher Dutyaddresses a much-neglected aspect of Civil War history."-The Journal of Military History
"...an authoritative, impressive work. Well researched and convincingly argues,Higher Dutyaddresses a much-neglected aspect of Civil War history."The Journal of Military History
"An authoritative, impressive work. Well researched and convincingly argues,Higher Dutyaddresses a much-neglected aspect of Civil War history."The Journal of Military History
'An authoritative, impressive work. Well researched and convincingly argues, Higher Duty addresses a much-neglected aspect of Civil War history.'?The Journal of Military History
"An authoritative, impressive work. Well researched and convincingly argues, Higher Duty addresses a much-neglected aspect of Civil War history." The Journal of Military History
"Mark A. Weitz has produced an impressive work on an important and much neglected aspect of the Civil War. Well written and researched, it is one of the very few works that go straight to the heart of why the Confederacy lost the war."-David Williams, author ofRich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
"Mark A. Weitz has produced an impressive work on an important and much neglected aspect of the Civil War. Well written and researched, it is one of the very few works that go straight to the heart of why the Confederacy lost the war."David Williams, author ofRich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
"Mark A. Weitz has produced an impressive work on an important and much neglected aspect of the Civil War. Well written and researched, it is one of the very few works that go straight to the heart of why the Confederacy lost the war."?David Williams, author of Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
"Mark A. Weitz has produced an impressive work on an important and much neglected aspect of the Civil War. Well written and researched, it is one of the very few works that go straight to the heart of why the Confederacy lost the war."David Williams, author of Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
"The topic of Confederate desertion remains one of the least well understood in the field of Civil War scholarship. Mark A. Weitz's study of desertion among Georgia's Confederate soldiers is a perceptive treatment of an important state that helps flesh out our understanding of why and when men left the ranks. With luck, this book will inspire further work on other Confederate states."-Gary W. Gallagher, author ofThe Confederate War
"The topic of Confederate desertion remains one of the least well understood in the field of Civil War scholarship. Mark A. Weitz's study of desertion among Georgia's Confederate soldiers is a perceptive treatment of an important state that helps flesh out our understanding of why and when men left the ranks. With luck, this book will inspire further work on other Confederate states."Gary W. Gallagher, author ofThe Confederate War
"The topic of Confederate desertion remains one of the least well understood in the field of Civil War scholarship. Mark A. Weitz's study of desertion among Georgia's Confederate soldiers is a perceptive treatment of an important state that helps flesh out our understanding of why and when men left the ranks. With luck, this book will inspire further work on other Confederate states."?Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War
"The topic of Confederate desertion remains one of the least well understood in the field of Civil War scholarship. Mark A. Weitz's study of desertion among Georgia's Confederate soldiers is a perceptive treatment of an important state that helps flesh out our understanding of why and when men left the ranks. With luck, this book will inspire further work on other Confederate states."Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War
"The topic of Confederate desertion remains one of the least well understood in the field of Civil War scholarship. Mark A. Weitz's study of desertion among Georgia's Confederate soldiers is a perceptive treatment of an important state that helps flesh out our understanding of why and when men left the ranks. With luck, this book will inspire further work on other Confederate states." - Gary W. Gallagher, author of 'The Confederate War' "Weitz makes a significant contribution to Civil War studies. This is a book that will be cited frequently and discussed often. It's a real winner." - Kenneth W. Noe, author of 'Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis' "Mark A. Weitz has produced an impressive work on an important and much neglected aspect of the Civil War. Well written and researched, it is one of the very few works that go straight to the heart of why the Confederacy lost the war." - David Williams, author of 'Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chatta-hoochee Valley'
"Using Georgia as a case study, Weitz offers a revisionist approach to standard interpretations of Confederate desertion patterns. . . . All levels."Choice
"Using Georgia as a case study, Weitz offers a revisionist approach to standard interpretations of Confederate desertion patterns. . . . All levels."-CHOICE
"Using Georgia as a case study, Weitz offers a revisionist approach to standard interpretations of Confederate desertion patterns. . . . All levels." Choice
"Using Georgia as a case study, Weitz offers a revisionist approach to standard interpretations of Confederate desertion patterns. . . . All levels."?Choice
"Weitz makes a significant contribution to Civil War studies. This is a book that will be cited frequently and discussed often. It's a real winner."-Kenneth W. Noe, author ofSouthwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis
"Weitz makes a significant contribution to Civil War studies. This is a book that will be cited frequently and discussed often. It's a real winner."Kenneth W. Noe, author ofSouthwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis
"Weitz makes a significant contribution to Civil War studies. This is a book that will be cited frequently and discussed often. It's a real winner."?Kenneth W. Noe, author of Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis
"Weitz makes a significant contribution to Civil War studies. This is a book that will be cited frequently and discussed often. It's a real winner."Kenneth W. Noe, author of Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work addresses issues associated with Confederate desertion. What does Confederate desertion say about Confederate nationalism and the war effort? Mark Weitz examines the emotional and psychological reasons that might induce a soldier to desert.
Main Description
This book addresses the most important issues associated with Confederate desertion. How many soldiers actually deserted, when did they desert, and why? What does Confederate desertion say about Confederate nationalism and the war effort? Mark A. Weitz has taken his argument beyond the obvious reasons for desertion-that war is a horrific and cruel experience--and examined the emotional and psychological reasons that might induce a soldier to desert. Just as loyalty to his fellow soldiers might influence a man to charge into a hail of lead, loyalty to his wife and family could also lead him to risk a firing squad in order to return home.
Main Description
This book addresses the most important issues associated with Confederate desertion. How many soldiers actually deserted, when did they desert, and why? What does Confederate desertion say about Confederate nationalism and the war effort? Mark A. Weitz has taken his argument beyond the obvious reasons for desertionthat war is a horrific and cruel experienceand examined the emotional and psychological reasons that might induce a soldier to desert. Just as loyalty to his fellow soldiers might influence a man to charge into a hail of lead, loyalty to his wife and family could also lead him to risk a firing squad in order to return home.
Main Description
This book addresses the most important issues associated with Confederate desertion. How many soldiers actually deserted, when did they desert, and why? What does Confederate desertion say about Confederate nationalism and the war effort? Mark A. Weitz has taken his argument beyond the obvious reasons for desertion - that war is a horrific and cruel experience - and examined the emotional and psychological reasons that might induce a soldier to desert. Just as loyalty to his fellow soldiers might influence a man to charge into a hail of lead, loyalty to his wife and family could also lead him to risk a firing squad in order to return home. Mark A. Weitz is an independent Civil War scholar.
Publisher Fact Sheet
Addresses a significant & long neglected issue of Civil War scholarship--the extent of & reasons for Confederate desertion during the war.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
List of Tablesp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. i
Seeds of Desertionp. 10
Preparing for the Prodigal Sonp. 35
Patterns of Flightp. 61
Calls from Homep. 90
Faces of Desertionp. 121
Unanswered Callsp. 139
Conclusionp. 171
Methodologyp. 181
Notesp. 183
Bibliographical Essayp. 215
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem