Catalogue

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Just anger : representing women's anger in early modern England /
Gwynne Kennedy.
imprint
Carbondale, IL : Southern Illinois University Press, c2000.
description
x, 199 p.
ISBN
0809322617 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Carbondale, IL : Southern Illinois University Press, c2000.
isbn
0809322617 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3648472
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gwynne Kennedy is an associate professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Just Angeris a solid book that will contribute to our understanding of women's history and women's writing in early modern England and of the history of emotion. Carefully positioned in relation to existing work, persuasive, and deftly supported, Kennedy's arguments conjoin theoretical and historical awareness in exemplary ways."Frances Dolan, author ofDangerous Familiars: Representations of Domestic Crime in England, 15501770
" Just Anger is a solid book that will contribute to our understanding of women's history and women's writing in early modern England and of the history of emotion. Carefully positioned in relation to existing work, persuasive, and deftly supported, Kennedy's arguments conjoin theoretical and historical awareness in exemplary ways."-- Frances Dolan , author of Dangerous Familiars: Representations of Domestic Crime in England, 1550-1770
"Just Angeris a solid book that will contribute to our understanding of women's history and women's writing in early modern England and of the history of emotion. Carefully positioned in relation to existing work, persuasive, and deftly supported, Kennedy's arguments conjoin theoretical and historical awareness in exemplary ways."--Frances Dolan, author ofDangerous Familiars: Representations of Domestic Crime in England, 1550-1770
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The first scholar to investigate the subject of women's anger in early modern England, Gwynne Kennedy analyzes portrayals of and attitudes toward women's anger in printed texts by or purporting to be written by women during the period. Kennedy draws from recent critical work on emotions by historians, literary scholars, philosophers, and psychologists as well as comparative studies of the emotions by cultural anthropologists. Kennedy also examines a number of male-authored works, including sermons, conduct literature, philosophy, rhetoric, and medicine. The focus of her work, however, is on representations of women's anger in printed works signed with women's names in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England. She addresses the ways these writings conform to, conflict with, or appear to reconfigure prevailing beliefs about women's anger. Kennedy looks at such literary texts as Mary Wroth's romance,The Countess of Montgomery's Urania, the first fiction by an English woman; Elizabeth Cary's play,The Tragedy of Mariam, the earliest extant play in English by a woman; and Aemilia Lanyer's verse collection,Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum.She also discusses religious writings by Protestant martyr Anne Askew and Elizabeth Cary's history of Edward II. Kennedy considers as well defenses of women's nature authored by women (Rachel Speght and Aemilia Lanyer) or published under female pseudonyms ("Jane Anger," "Ester Sowernam," and "Constantia Munda"). Kennedy demonstrates the importance of class and race as factors affecting anger's legitimacy and its forms of expression. She shows how early modern assumptions about women's anger can help to create or exaggerate other differences among women. Her close scrutiny of anger against female inferiority emphasizes the crucial role of emotions in the construction of self-worth and identity.
Main Description
The first scholar to investigate the subject of women's anger in early modern England, Gwynne Kennedy analyzes portrayals of and attitudes toward women's anger in printed texts by or purporting to be written by women during the period. Kennedy draws from recent critical work on emotions by historians, literary scholars, philosophers, and psychologists as well as comparative studies of the emotions by cultural anthropologists. Kennedy also examines a number of male-authored works, including sermons, conduct literature, philosophy, rhetoric, and medicine. The focus of her work, however, is on representations of women's anger in printed works signed with women's names in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England. She addresses the ways these writings conform to, conflict with, or appear to reconfigure prevailing beliefs about women's anger. Kennedy looks at such literary texts as Mary Wroth's romance, The Countess of Montgomery's Urania , the first fiction by an English woman; Elizabeth Cary's play, The Tragedy of Mariam , the earliest extant play in English by a woman; and Aemilia Lanyer's verse collection, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum. She also discusses religious writings by Protestant martyr Anne Askew and Elizabeth Cary's history of Edward II. Kennedy considers as well defenses of women's nature authored by women (Rachel Speght and Aemilia Lanyer) or published under female pseudonyms ("Jane Anger," "Ester Sowernam," and "Constantia Munda"). Kennedy demonstrates the importance of class and race as factors affecting anger's legitimacy and its forms of expression. She shows how early modern assumptions about women's anger can help to create or exaggerate other differences among women. Her close scrutiny of anger against female inferiority emphasizes the crucial role of emotions in the construction of self-worth and identity.
Unpaid Annotation
Gwynne Kennedy is the first scholar to investigate thoroughly the subject of women's anger in early modern England. She analyzes portrayals of and attitudes toward women's anger in printed texts written by or purporting to be written by women during the period.Recognizing that ideas about emotions vary historically as well as culturally, Kennedy draws from recent critical work on emotions by historians, literary scholars, philosophers, and psychologists, as well as comparative studies of the emotions by cultural anthropologists. She contends that ideas about women's anger in early modern England are both like and unlike those in twentieth-century America. Although women's anger is often dismissed as irrational in both eras, for instance, in the early modern era women were thought to become angry more often and more easily than men due to their inherent physiological, intellectual, and moral inferiority.To establish early modern attitudes toward women's anger, Kennedy also examines a number of male-authored works, including sermons, conduct literature, philosophy, rhetoric, and medicine. The focus of her work, however, is on representations of women's anger in printed works signed with women's names in late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. She addresses the ways these writings conform to, conflict with, or appear to reconfigure prevailing beliefs about women's anger.In exploring her subject, Kennedy deals with many popular genres of the period. She looks at such literary texts as Mary Wroth's romance, The Countess of Montgomery's Urania, the first fiction by an English woman; Elizabeth Cary's play, The Tragedy of Mariam, the earliest extant play in English by awoman; and Aemilia Lanyer's verse collection, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum. She also discusses religious writings by Protestant martyr Anne Askew and Elizabeth Cary's history of Edward II. Kennedy considers as well defenses of w
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Becoming Angry: The Gendering of Emotions in Early Modern Englandp. 1
Angry Readers: Texts from the "Woman Controversy"p. 23
Angry Wives: Elizabeth Cary's The Tragedy of Mariamp. 51
Angry Wives as Political Subjects: Elizabeth Cary's The History of the Life, Reign, and Death of Edward IIp. 75
Angry Lovers: Mary Wroth's The Countess of Montgomery's Uraniap. 115
Angry for God: Anne Askew's Examinationsp. 143
Afterword: The Politics of Angerp. 161
Notesp. 165
Works Citedp. 179
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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