Catalogue


Early modern women's writing : an anthology, 1560-1700 /
edited with an introduction and notes by Paul Salzman.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xl, 442 p. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0192833464
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0192833464
catalogue key
3643757
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxxiii]-xxxviii).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection introduces readers to the full variety of women's writing during the 16th and 17th centuries - from poetry, prose and fiction to prophecies, letters, tracts and philosophy.
Main Description
In a famous passage in A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf asked 'why women did not write poetry in the Elizabethan age'. She went on to speculate about an imaginary Judith Shakespeare who might have been destined for a career as illustrious as that of her brother William, except that she hadnone of his chances. The truth is that many women wrote during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and this collection will serve to introduce modern readers to the full variety of women's writing in this period from poems, prose and fiction to prophecies, letters, tracts and philosophy. Thecollection begins with the poetry of Isabella Whitney, who worked in a gentlewoman's household in London in the late 1560s, and ends with Aphra Behn who was employed as a spy in Amsterdam by Charles II. Here are examples of the work of twelve women writers, allowing the reader to sample thediverse and lively output of all classes and opinions, from artistcrats such as Mary Wroth, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish to women of obscure background caught up in the religious ferment of the mid seventeenth century like Hester Biddle, Pricscilla Cotton and Mary Cole. The collectionincludes three plays, and a generous selection of poetry, letters, diary, prose fiction, religious polemic, prohecy and scienticficic speculation, offering the reader the possibilility of tracing patterns through the works collected and some sense of historical shifts and changes. All the extractsare edited afresh from original sources and the anthology includes comprehensive notes, both explanatory and textual.
Main Description
This anthology is a unique collection of rare women's writing written during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This collection introduces modern readers to the various examples of the work of women writers from these centuries and includes poems, prose and fiction, drama, letters, prophecies, tracts and philosophy. The collection begins with the poetry of Isabella Whitney, who worked in a gentlewoman's household in London in the late 1560s, and ends with Aphra Behn, who was employed as a spy in Amsterdam by Charles II. Also collected here are examples of ten other women writers, allowing the reader to sample the diverse and lively output of all classes and opinions, from aristocrats Mary Wroth, Anne Clifford, and Margaret Cavendish to women of obscure background caught up in the religious ferment of the mid-seventeenth century like Hester Biddle, Priscilla Cotton, and Mary Cole. The collection offers readers the possibility of tracing patterns through the works as well as a sense of historical shift and change. Each text is newly edited from its original source and includes comprehensive notes, both explanatory and textual.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction
Note on the Texts
Select Bibliography
Chronology
Isabella Whitney (fl. 1576-1578)
Aemilia Lanyer (1569-1645)
Anne Clifford (1590-1676)
Mary Wroth (c.1587-c.1653)
Eleanor Davies (1590-1652)
Priscilla Cotton and Mary Cole (fl. 1650s/1660s)
Hester Biddle (c.1629-1696)
Margaret Cavendish (1623-1673)
Dorothy Osborne (1627-1695)
Katherine Philips (1632-1664)
Aphra Behn (c.1640-1689)
Explanatory Notes
Textual Notes
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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