Catalogue


The Brazilian empire : myths & histories /
Emilia Viotti da Costa.
edition
Rev. ed.
imprint
Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, c2000.
description
xxvii, 320 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0807848409 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, c2000.
isbn
0807848409 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
Originally published by the University of Chicago Press in 1985.
catalogue key
3618306
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Emilia Viotti da Costa has written extensively on Brazilian history and on slavery and emancipation.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This classic work of on the history of 19th-century Brazil now includes a new chapter on women.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-09:
The new effort of this eminent Brazilian historian is a very personal synthesis of the events and patterns that shaped 19th-century Brazil. As such, there are no surprises: the text moves easily from independence through the end of the monarchy, and manages to cite most of the current literature as well. There are no thematic ties that hold the book together; Viotti da Costa bends over backward to avoid analyzing Brazil as part of the international capitalist market economy. Her writings on race relations lack some of the punch of Thomas Skidmore's Black Into White (CH, Dec '74), and one wishes she had expanded further on her historiographical analysis, particularly the S~ao Paulo scholars of the 1960s. Notwithstanding, this is a laudable effort, demonstrating breadth of knowledge and overall intuition. Although not so chronologically organized as some of the other English-language general histories of Brazil (e.g., E. Bradford Burns's The History of Brazil, 2nd ed., CH, Jan '81 or Donald Worcester's Brazil, From Colony to World Power, CH, Feb '74), the in-depth coverage of this critical century, as well as the humanistic perspective, makes this work a valuable addition to collections on Latin America. Upper-division undergraduates and above.-R. Delson, Institute of Latin American and Iberian Studies
Appeared in Library Journal on 2000-05-15:
Da Costa here updates her 1985 volume with the addition of a chapter on the role of women in Brazil and Latin America in the 19th century. This book garnered many favorable notices in scholarly circles when first published, and the revisions should make it all the more valuable. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
All facets of the 'empire'--politics, economics, culture and society--are skillfully interwoven and excellently researched.Times of the Americas
All facets of the 'empire'_politics, economics, culture and society_are skillfully interwoven and excellently researched. Times of the Americas
All facets of the 'empire'--politics, economics, culture and society--are skillfully interwoven and excellently researched. Times of the Americas
A thoughtful interpretive history that helps us to understand both the Brazilian empire and the republic that replaced it. Journal of Interdisciplinary History
Perhaps the most thoughtful analysis of nineteenth-century Brazil.Latin American Research Review
Perhaps the most thoughtful analysis of nineteenth-century Brazil. Latin American Research Review
[These essays] reveal a critical mind searching for the links between ruling classes and those ruled, between elites and masses.American Historical Review
[These essays] reveal a critical mind searching for the links between ruling classes and those ruled, between elites and masses. American Historical Review
This is one of the best introductions to Brazil in English that one could want.Bulletin of Hispanic Studies
This is one of the best introductions to Brazil in English that one could want. Bulletin of Hispanic Studies
A thoughtful interpretive history that helps us to understand both the Brazilian empire and the republic that replaced it.Journal of Interdisciplinary History
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
This classic work is must reading for anyone who would understand Brazil and Latin America, past and present. First published in 1985 and now expanded to include a new chapter on women in Brazilian history, the book explores the social, political, economic, and intellectual currents that shaped nineteenth-century Brazil and whose reverberations continue to be felt throughout contemporary Brazilian society. Placing her findings in a rich comparative context with regard to U.S. history, Emilia Viotti da Costa concentrates on crucial moments in Brazilian history to shed light on a number of vexing questions: Why in a nation so rich in material resources is there so much poverty? How was slavery abolished without bloodshed in a country where slaves had represented the main labor force for almost four hundred years? Why did self-described liberal elites twice lead the country toward authoritarian regimes? In exploring these and other puzzles, she uncovers the realities behind many of the persistent myths surrounding the Brazilian empire.
Long Description
This classic work is must reading for anyone who would understand Brazil and Latin America, past and present. First published in 1985 and now expanded to include a new chapter on women in Brazilian history, the book explores the social, political, economic, and intellectual currents that shaped nineteenth-century Brazil and whose reverberations continue to be felt throughout contemporary Brazilian society.Placing her findings in a rich comparative context with regard to U.S. history, Emilia Viotti da Costa concentrates on crucial moments in Brazilian history to shed light on a number of vexing questions: Why in a nation so rich in material resources is there so much poverty? How was slavery abolished without bloodshed in a country where slaves had represented the main labor force for almost four hundred years? Why did self-described liberal elites twice lead the country toward authoritarian regimes? In exploring these and other puzzles, she uncovers the realities behind many of the persistent myths surrounding the Brazilian empire.
Table of Contents
Chronologyp. xi
Note on the Revised Editionp. xiii
Prefacep. xv
Introductionp. xix
Independence: The Building of a Nationp. 1
Jose Bonifacio de Andrada e Silva A Brazilian Founding Fatherp. 24
Liberalism: Theory and Practicep. 53
Land Policies: The Land Law, 1850, and the Homestead Act, 1862p. 78
Sharecroppers and Plantation Owners: An Experiment with Free Laborp. 94
Masters and Slaves: From Slave Labor to Free Laborp. 125
Town and Countryp. 172
The Fall of the Monarchyp. 202
The Myth of Racial Democracy: A Legacy of the Empirep. 234
Patriarchalism and the Myth of the Helpless Woman in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 247
Epiloguep. 266
Notesp. 269
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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