Catalogue


Ground water contamination : transport and remediation /
Phillip B. Bedient, Hanadi S. Rifai, Charles J. Newell.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall PTR, c1999.
description
xv, 604 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0130138401 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall PTR, c1999.
isbn
0130138401 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3618185
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr. Philip B. Bedient is Professor and Chair of the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX. He is author and co-author of over 100 articles and five textbooks related to surface and ground water hydrology and containment transport. Bedient has directed over 40 research projects, including the BIOPLUME II program for modeling aerobic biodegradation of organic contaminants in ground water. He also helped direct the extensive remediation studies at HUAFD. Dr. Hanadi S. Rifai is Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston. She teaches courses in hydrology, fluid mechanics, engineering design, risk assessment, and geographic information systems, has co-authored two textbooks, and is principal author of the BIOPLUME II and III models. Dr. Charles J. Newell is Vice President of Groundwater Services, Inc. and Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at, Rice University, Houston, TX. He was Principal Investigator for the multiplesite natural attenuation project at the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence.
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
PREFACE The 1970s ushered in a new decade of environmental awareness in response to major air pollution and water quality problems throughout the country. One of the primary missions of the newly formed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was to define, maintain, and protect the quality of the nation's surface waters and subsurface aquifers. The field of environmental engineering was in its infancy, but hydrologists, civil and environmental engineers, hydrogeologists and other scientists were needed to provide the necessary expertise and engineering designs for water pollution control of surface waters. By the late 1970s, the discovery of hazardous wastes at sites such as Love Canal in New York, the Denver Arsenal in Colorado, and a number of chlorinated organics sites in California and Arizona ushered in a new era in hazardous waste site problems. In the early 1980s, a large number of major disposal sites were discovered associated with industrial and military practices. These sites had been in place for decades. As a result, literally thousands of studies of active and abandoned waste sites and spills were conducted, as required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund legislation administered by EPA, all designed to protect ground water quality (Chapter 14). During this time, hydrogeologists and consulting engineers were collecting samples, characterizing geology, analyzing data, and remediating hazardous waste sites with respect to ground water contamination. More than 1500 hazardous waste sites were eventually placed on the National Priorities List and thousands of other sites still remaining to be cleaned up. By 1985, leaking underground fuel tanks became one of the most ubiquitous of all subsurface contamination issues. In addition, chlorinated hydrocarbon sites were recognized as some of the most difficult to remediate due to the presence of newly discovered non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). But as these sites and others were being investigated and remediation systems were being designed and installed across the country, it became clear by 1989 that many of these systems were not working to cleanup aquifers to drinking water standards. By the early 1990s, EPA and the National Research Council found that the nation was wasting large sums of money on ineffective remediation systems, such as pump and treat (see Chapter 13). Along with the maturing of environmental engineering and related ground water fields in the eighties, attention to hazardous waste problems has greatly expanded the scope and emphasis of traditional ground water investigations. Contaminant transport in the subsurface is of paramount importance and encompasses physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms which affect rates of migration, degradation, and ultimate remediation. In the nineties, many of the these complex transport mechanisms were evaluated at actual field sites or in supporting laboratory studies. After all of the efforts spent on analyzing and remediating soluble contaminant plumes, scientists and engineers in the nineties and beyond 2000 must be prepared to deal with more complex problems. These include source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, and vapors in the unsaturated zone. LNAPLs, which float on the water table, and DNAPLs, which sink to the bottom of an aquifer, can leach contamination for decades to shallow ground water aquifers. Specialized remediation schemes, which might involve a variety of methods for a mixture of chemicals, must now be evaluated in complex ground water settings. The old concept of simply pumping out the contaminated ground water does not effectively work to return an aquifer to useful condition. Rather, new and emerging methods and models must be considered in order to address and possibly control complex NAPL source zones. The second edition of our textbook has been writte
Introduction or Preface
PREFACEThe 1970s ushered in a new decade of environmental awareness in response to major air pollution and water quality problems throughout the country. One of the primary missions of the newly formed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was to define, maintain, and protect the quality of the nation's surface waters and subsurface aquifers. The field of environmental engineering was in its infancy, but hydrologists, civil and environmental engineers, hydrogeologists and other scientists were needed to provide the necessary expertise and engineering designs for water pollution control of surface waters.By the late 1970s, the discovery of hazardous wastes at sites such as Love Canal in New York, the Denver Arsenal in Colorado, and a number of chlorinated organics sites in California and Arizona ushered in a new era in hazardous waste site problems. In the early 1980s, a large number of major disposal sites were discovered associated with industrial and military practices. These sites had been in place for decades. As a result, literally thousands of studies of active and abandoned waste sites and spills were conducted, as required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund legislation administered by EPA, all designed to protect ground water quality (Chapter 14). During this time, hydrogeologists and consulting engineers were collecting samples, characterizing geology, analyzing data, and remediating hazardous waste sites with respect to ground water contamination. More than 1500 hazardous waste sites were eventually placed on the National Priorities List and thousands of other sites still remaining to be cleaned up.By 1985, leaking underground fuel tanks became one of the most ubiquitous of all subsurface contamination issues. In addition, chlorinated hydrocarbon sites were recognized as some of the most difficult to remediate due to the presence of newly discovered non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). But as these sites and others were being investigated and remediation systems were being designed and installed across the country, it became clear by 1989 that many of these systems were not working to cleanup aquifers to drinking water standards. By the early 1990s, EPA and the National Research Council found that the nation was wasting large sums of money on ineffective remediation systems, such as pump and treat (see Chapter 13).Along with the maturing of environmental engineering and related ground water fields in the eighties, attention to hazardous waste problems has greatly expanded the scope and emphasis of traditional ground water investigations. Contaminant transport in the subsurface is of paramount importance and encompasses physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms which affect rates of migration, degradation, and ultimate remediation. In the nineties, many of the these complex transport mechanisms were evaluated at actual field sites or in supporting laboratory studies.After all of the efforts spent on analyzing and remediating soluble contaminant plumes, scientists and engineers in the nineties and beyond 2000 must be prepared to deal with more complex problems. These include source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, and vapors in the unsaturated zone. LNAPLs, which float on the water table, and DNAPLs, which sink to the bottom of an aquifer, can leach contamination for decades to shallow ground water aquifers. Specialized remediation schemes, which might involve a variety of methods for a mixture of chemicals, must now be evaluated in complex ground water settings. The old concept of simply pumping out the contaminated ground water does not effectively work to return an aquifer to useful condition. Rather, new and emerging methods and models must be considered in order to address and possibly control complex NAPL source zones.The second edition of our textbook has been written to better addres
Introduction or Preface
PREFACE The 1970s ushered in a new decade of environmental awareness in response to major air pollution and water quality problems throughout the country. One of the primary missions of the newly formed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was to define, maintain, and protect the quality of the nation''s surface waters and subsurface aquifers. The field of environmental engineering was in its infancy, but hydrologists, civil and environmental engineers, hydrogeologists and other scientists were needed to provide the necessary expertise and engineering designs for water pollution control of surface waters. By the late 1970s, the discovery of hazardous wastes at sites such as Love Canal in New York, the Denver Arsenal in Colorado, and a number of chlorinated organics sites in California and Arizona ushered in a new era in hazardous waste site problems. In the early 1980s, a large number of major disposal sites were discovered associated with industrial and military practices. These sites had been in place for decades. As a result, literally thousands of studies of active and abandoned waste sites and spills were conducted, as required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund legislation administered by EPA, all designed to protect ground water quality (Chapter 14). During this time, hydrogeologists and consulting engineers were collecting samples, characterizing geology, analyzing data, and remediating hazardous waste sites with respect to ground water contamination. More than 1500 hazardous waste sites were eventually placed on the National Priorities List and thousands of other sites still remaining to be cleaned up. By 1985, leaking underground fuel tanks became one of the most ubiquitous of all subsurface contamination issues. In addition, chlorinated hydrocarbon sites were recognized as some of the most difficult to remediate due to the presence of newly discovered non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). But as these sites and others were being investigated and remediation systems were being designed and installed across the country, it became clear by 1989 that many of these systems were not working to cleanup aquifers to drinking water standards. By the early 1990s, EPA and the National Research Council found that the nation was wasting large sums of money on ineffective remediation systems, such as pump and treat (see Chapter 13). Along with the maturing of environmental engineering and related ground water fields in the eighties, attention to hazardous waste problems has greatly expanded the scope and emphasis of traditional ground water investigations. Contaminant transport in the subsurface is of paramount importance and encompasses physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms which affect rates of migration, degradation, and ultimate remediation. In the nineties, many of the these complex transport mechanisms were evaluated at actual field sites or in supporting laboratory studies. After all of the efforts spent on analyzing and remediating soluble contaminant plumes, scientists and engineers in the nineties and beyond 2000 must be prepared to deal with more complex problems. These include source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, and vapors in the unsaturated zone. LNAPLs, which float on the water table, and DNAPLs, which sink to the bottom of an aquifer, can leach contamination for decades to shallow ground water aquifers. Specialized remediation schemes, which might involve a variety of methods for a mixture of chemicals, must now be evaluated in complex ground water settings. The old concept of simply pumping out the contaminated ground water does not effectively work to return an aquifer to useful condition. Rather, new and emerging methods and models must be considered in order to address and possibly control complex NAPL source zones. The second edition of our textbook has been written to better address the scientific and engineering aspects of subsurface contaminant transport and remediation in ground water. This book contains traditional emphasis on site characterization and hydrogeologic evaluation, but with an orientation to the engineering analysis and modeling of complex field problems, compared to other texts written primarily for hydrogeologists. The current text is a departure from past efforts in that it is written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint with engineering methods and transport theory applied directly to hazardous waste site investigation. Entire chapters are included on biodegradation, soil vapor transport, contaminant transport modeling, and site remediation. A number of new case studies have been added that illustrate the various evaluation schemes and emerging remediation techniques. This second edition is designed for hydrologists, civil, environmental, and chemical engineers, hydrogeologists, and other decision makers in the ground water field who are or will be involved in the evaluation and remediation of the nation''s ground water. However, the field of ground water contamination has changed rapidly in recent years (since 1994) as new remediation techniques are being researched in laboratories and at many field sites nationwide. Any modern student of the topic must keep a watchful eye on the literature, which reports both results and breakthroughs on a monthly basis. We hope this text will provide the fundamentals for understanding and incorporating new approaches into the more traditional methods developed in site investigations of the past two decades. The legal framework of ground water legislation under RCRA and Superfund has provided significant guidance and funding for many of the ground water studies which have been performed to date. These comprehensive legal instruments set into motion an entire industry devoted to the identification, characterization, and remediation of hazardous waste sites throughout the U.S. As a result of billions of dollars allocated for remedial investigations and studies in the past 20 years, thousands of engineers and scientists now form the core of the ground water and remediation industry. During this time, college and university programs quickly added ground water flow and transport courses to their traditional fields of civil and environmental engineering and geology. And professional groups, such as the Assn. of Ground Water Scientists and Engineers, saw their memberships grow in response to the challenge of education and technology transfer. Our new revision was written in response to the tremendous demand in the college classroom and in the environmental industry for a modern engineering approach to ground water contamination problems of the nineties and beyond. Any practicing hydrologist or engineer today must understand mechanisms of ground water flow (Chapters 2 and 3), sources of contamination (Chapter 4), site investigations (Chapter 5), and contaminant transport (Chapters 6 and 7). In addition, biodegradation (Chapters 7 and 8), modeling approaches (Chapter 10), NAPL impacts in source areas and plumes (Chapters 11), natural attenuation (Chapter 12), and emerging remediation schemes (Chapter 13) are covered. In the second edition, Chapters 4, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 13 have been completely rewritten to better reflect current trends and ideas. Many new examples and case studies have been added based on emerging methods from the current literature, A new chapter on natural attenuation and risk assessment has been added, along with detailed discussions of emerging remediation methods such as surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing for sites contaminated with residual oils. The organization is described in more detail in Chapter 1.
First Chapter

PREFACE

The 1970s ushered in a new decade of environmental awareness in response to major air pollution and water quality problems throughout the country. One of the primary missions of the newly formed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was to define, maintain, and protect the quality of the nation's surface waters and subsurface aquifers. The field of environmental engineering was in its infancy, but hydrologists, civil and environmental engineers, hydrogeologists and other scientists were needed to provide the necessary expertise and engineering designs for water pollution control of surface waters.

By the late 1970s, the discovery of hazardous wastes at sites such as Love Canal in New York, the Denver Arsenal in Colorado, and a number of chlorinated organics sites in California and Arizona ushered in a new era in hazardous waste site problems. In the early 1980s, a large number of major disposal sites were discovered associated with industrial and military practices. These sites had been in place for decades. As a result, literally thousands of studies of active and abandoned waste sites and spills were conducted, as required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund legislation administered by EPA, all designed to protect ground water quality (Chapter 14). During this time, hydrogeologists and consulting engineers were collecting samples, characterizing geology, analyzing data, and remediating hazardous waste sites with respect to ground water contamination. More than 1500 hazardous waste sites were eventually placed on the National Priorities List and thousands of other sites still remaining to be cleaned up.

By 1985, leaking underground fuel tanks became one of the most ubiquitous of all subsurface contamination issues. In addition, chlorinated hydrocarbon sites were recognized as some of the most difficult to remediate due to the presence of newly discovered non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). But as these sites and others were being investigated and remediation systems were being designed and installed across the country, it became clear by 1989 that many of these systems were not working to cleanup aquifers to drinking water standards. By the early 1990s, EPA and the National Research Council found that the nation was wasting large sums of money on ineffective remediation systems, such as pump and treat (see Chapter 13).

Along with the maturing of environmental engineering and related ground water fields in the eighties, attention to hazardous waste problems has greatly expanded the scope and emphasis of traditional ground water investigations. Contaminant transport in the subsurface is of paramount importance and encompasses physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms which affect rates of migration, degradation, and ultimate remediation. In the nineties, many of the these complex transport mechanisms were evaluated at actual field sites or in supporting laboratory studies.

After all of the efforts spent on analyzing and remediating soluble contaminant plumes, scientists and engineers in the nineties and beyond 2000 must be prepared to deal with more complex problems. These include source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, and vapors in the unsaturated zone. LNAPLs, which float on the water table, and DNAPLs, which sink to the bottom of an aquifer, can leach contamination for decades to shallow ground water aquifers. Specialized remediation schemes, which might involve a variety of methods for a mixture of chemicals, must now be evaluated in complex ground water settings. The old concept of simply pumping out the contaminated ground water does not effectively work to return an aquifer to useful condition. Rather, new and emerging methods and models must be considered in order to address and possibly control complex NAPL source zones.

The second edition of our textbook has been written to better address the scientific and engineering aspects of subsurface contaminant transport and remediation in ground water. This book contains traditional emphasis on site characterization and hydrogeologic evaluation, but with an orientation to the engineering analysis and modeling of complex field problems, compared to other texts written primarily for hydrogeologists. The current text is a departure from past efforts in that it is written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint with engineering methods and transport theory applied directly to hazardous waste site investigation. Entire chapters are included on biodegradation, soil vapor transport, contaminant transport modeling, and site remediation. A number of new case studies have been added that illustrate the various evaluation schemes and emerging remediation techniques.

This second edition is designed for hydrologists, civil, environmental, and chemical engineers, hydrogeologists, and other decision makers in the ground water field who are or will be involved in the evaluation and remediation of the nation's ground water. However, the field of ground water contamination has changed rapidly in recent years (since 1994) as new remediation techniques are being researched in laboratories and at many field sites nationwide. Any modern student of the topic must keep a watchful eye on the literature, which reports both results and breakthroughs on a monthly basis. We hope this text will provide the fundamentals for understanding and incorporating new approaches into the more traditional methods developed in site investigations of the past two decades.

The legal framework of ground water legislation under RCRA and Superfund has provided significant guidance and funding for many of the ground water studies which have been performed to date. These comprehensive legal instruments set into motion an entire industry devoted to the identification, characterization, and remediation of hazardous waste sites throughout the U.S. As a result of billions of dollars allocated for remedial investigations and studies in the past 20 years, thousands of engineers and scientists now form the core of the ground water and remediation industry. During this time, college and university programs quickly added ground water flow and transport courses to their traditional fields of civil and environmental engineering and geology. And professional groups, such as the Assn. of Ground Water Scientists and Engineers, saw their memberships grow in response to the challenge of education and technology transfer.

Our new revision was written in response to the tremendous demand in the college classroom and in the environmental industry for a modern engineering approach to ground water contamination problems of the nineties and beyond. Any practicing hydrologist or engineer today must understand mechanisms of ground water flow (Chapters 2 and 3), sources of contamination (Chapter 4), site investigations (Chapter 5), and contaminant transport (Chapters 6 and 7). In addition, biodegradation (Chapters 7 and 8), modeling approaches (Chapter 10), NAPL impacts in source areas and plumes (Chapters 11), natural attenuation (Chapter 12), and emerging remediation schemes (Chapter 13) are covered. In the second edition, Chapters 4, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 13 have been completely rewritten to better reflect current trends and ideas. Many new examples and case studies have been added based on emerging methods from the current literature, A new chapter on natural attenuation and risk assessment has been added, along with detailed discussions of emerging remediation methods such as surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing for sites contaminated with residual oils. The organization is described in more detail in Chapter 1.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-09:
A synthesis of recent advances in the fields of groundwater contamination, transport processes, and remediation, this book begins with a condensed but lucid review of aquifer and well hydraulics, illustrated with numerical examples. The geologic background required to apply these concepts is mentioned only in passing and must be obtained largely from other sources. The main part of the book concerns contaminant types, sources, chemical reactions, and transport processes, with special emphasis on nonaqueous-phase liquids. Digital simulation of contaminant transport is described, with reference to readily available software. Site investigation methods, monitoring strategies, sampling methods, rudiments of data analysis, remedial measures in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, and legal and legislative aspects of the field are covered; there are case studies as well. These topics are treated in other works, but here they are drawn together into a single, practical, clearly presented, and well-illustrated volume, while retaining considerable depth of coverage. Suited to a wide range of readers at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels. Highly recommended for any academic library. A. N. Palmer; SUNY College at Oneonta
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, December 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
1384K-0 State-of-the-art theory and practice of groundwater contamination, mitigation, and remediation Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is a thorough update to the leading book on groundwater contamination and remediation for scientists and engineers. Written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, this edition focuses on the critical new challenges facing professionals seeking to prevent, mitigate, or remediate groundwater problems -- especially today's highly-complex transport problems. Detailed new coverage includes a full chapter on sorption, biodegradation, and natural attenuation processes; extensive new coverage of risk assessment; and the results of major field studies on several military and Superfund sites. The book reflects increased concern about source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, vapors in the unsaturated zone, gasoline spills which float on the water table, and chlorinated solvent spills which sink to the bottom of aquifers. Coverage includes: Detailed coverage of analytical and numerical methods Extensive case studies and field research from military and Superfund sites Waste site characterization and remedial design Emerging remediation methods, including surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing The new edition includes access to programs and worksheets for Microsoft Excel via the World Wide Web, and contains an extensive set of revised homework problems and solutions for topics such as groundwater flow, well mechanics, and contamination transport. Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is an essential resource for all hydrogeologists, civil and environmental consulting engineers, and other professionals concerned with groundwater contamination and remediation. It is ideally designed for use in the college classroom.
Back Cover Copy
1384K-0State-of-the-art theory and practice of groundwater contamination, mitigation, and remediationGround Water Contamination, Second Edition is a thorough update to the leading book on groundwater contamination and remediation for scientists and engineers. Written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, this edition focuses on the critical new challenges facing professionals seeking to prevent, mitigate, or remediate groundwater problems -- especially today's highly-complex transport problems.Detailed new coverage includes a full chapter on sorption, biodegradation, and natural attenuation processes; extensive new coverage of risk assessment; and the results of major field studies on several military and Superfund sites. The book reflects increased concern about source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, vapors in the unsaturated zone, gasoline spills which float on the water table, and chlorinated solvent spills which sink to the bottom of aquifers. Coverage includes: Detailed coverage of analytical and numerical methods Extensive case studies and field research from military and Superfund sites Waste site characterization and remedial design Emerging remediation methods, including surfactant and co-solvent soil flushingThe new edition includes access to programs and worksheets for Microsoft Excel via the World Wide Web, and contains an extensive set of revised homework problems and solutions for topics such as groundwater flow, well mechanics, and contamination transport. Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is an essential resource for all hydrogeologists, civil and environmental consulting engineers, and other professionals concerned with groundwater contamination and remediation. It is ideally designed for use in the college classroom.
Back Cover Copy
State-of-the-art theory and practice of groundwater contamination, mitigation, and remediationGround Water Contamination, Second Edition is a thorough update to the leading book on groundwater contamination and remediation for scientists and engineers. Written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, this edition focuses on the critical new challenges facing professionals seeking to prevent, mitigate, or remediate groundwater problems -- especially today's highly-complex transport problems.Detailed new coverage includes a full chapter on sorption, biodegradation, and natural attenuation processes; extensive new coverage of risk assessment; and the results of major field studies on several military and Superfund sites. The book reflects increased concern about source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, vapors in the unsaturated zone, gasoline spills which float on the water table, and chlorinated solvent spills which sink to the bottom of aquifers. Coverage includes: Detailed coverage of analytical and numerical methods Extensive case studies and field research from military and Superfund sites Waste site characterization and remedial design Emerging remediation methods, including surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing The new edition includes access to programs and worksheets for Microsoft Excel via the World Wide Web, and contains an extensive set of revised homework problems and solutions for topics such as groundwater flow, well mechanics, and contamination transport. Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is an essential resource for all hydrogeologists, civil and environmental consulting engineers, and other professionals concerned with groundwater contamination and remediation. It is ideally designed for use in the college classroom.
Main Description
State-of-the-art theory and practice of groundwater contamination, mitigation, and remediation Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is a thorough update to the leading book on groundwater contamination and remediation for scientists and engineers. Written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, this edition focuses on the critical new challenges facing professionals seeking to prevent, mitigate, or remediate groundwater problems -- especially today's highly-complex transport problems. Detailed new coverage includes a full chapter on sorption, biodegradation, and natural attenuation processes; extensive new coverage of risk assessment; and the results of major field studies on several military and Superfund sites. The book reflects increased concern about source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, vapors in the unsaturated zone, gasoline spills which float on the water table, and chlorinated solvent spills which sink to the bottom of aquifers. Coverage includes: bull; bull; Detailed coverage of analytical and numerical methods bull; Extensive case studies and field research from military and Superfund sites bull; Waste site characterization and remedial design bull; Emerging remediation methods, including surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing The new edition includes access to programs and worksheets for Microsoft Excel via the World Wide Web, and contains an extensive set of revised homework problems and solutions for topics such as groundwater flow, well mechanics, and contamination transport. Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is an essential resource for all hydrogeologists, civil and environmental consulting engineers, and other professionals concerned with groundwater contamination and remediation. It is ideally designed for use in the college classroom.
Unpaid Annotation
State-of-the-art theory and practice of groundwater contamination, mitigation, and remediation Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is a thorough update to the leading book on groundwater contamination and remediation for scientists and engineers. Written from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, this edition focuses on the critical new challenges facing professionals seeking to prevent, mitigate, or remediate groundwater problems -- especially today's highly-complex transport problems. Detailed new coverage includes a full chapter on sorption, biodegradation, and natural attenuation processes; extensive new coverage of risk assessment; and the results of major field studies on several military and Superfund sites. The book reflects increased concern about source zone areas with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), residual oils, vapors in the unsaturated zone, gasoline spills which float on the water table, and chlorinated solvent spills which sink to the bottom of aquifers. Coverage includes: Detailed coverage of analytical and numerical methods Extensive case studies and field research from military and Superfund sites Waste site characterization and remedial design Emerging remediation methods, including surfactant and co-solvent soil flushing The new edition includes access to programs and worksheets for Microsoft Excel via the World Wide Web, and contains an extensive set of revised homework problems and solutions for topics such as groundwater flow, well mechanics, and contamination transport. Ground Water Contamination, Second Edition is an essential resource for all hydrogeologists, civil andenvironmental consulting engineers, and other professionals concerned with groundwater contamination and remediation. It is ideally designed for use in the college classroom.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction to Ground Water Contaminationp. 1
The Hydrologic Cyclep. 1
Ground Water Hydrologyp. 3
Ground Water Contamination and Transportp. 6
Evolution of Ground Water Informationp. 11
Ground Water Remediationp. 12
Ground Water Hydrologyp. 15
Introductionp. 15
Properties of Ground Waterp. 16
Ground Water Movementp. 23
General Flow Equationsp. 34
Dupuit Equationsp. 37
Streamlines and Equipotential Linesp. 41
Unsaturated Flow and the Water Tablep. 45
Ground Water Flow and Well Mechanicsp. 49
Steady-State Well Hydraulicsp. 49
Steady One-Dimensional Flowp. 50
Steady Radial Flow to a Well--Confinedp. 50
Steady Radial Flow to a Well--Unconfinedp. 52
Well in a Uniform Flow Fieldp. 54
Multiple-Well Systemp. 55
Unsteady Well Hydraulicsp. 58
Sources and Types of Groundwater Contaminationp. 75
Introductionp. 75
Underground Storage Tanksp. 83
Landfillsp. 85
Surface Impoundmentsp. 87
Waste Disposal Injection Wellsp. 88
Septic Systemsp. 90
Agricultural Wastesp. 92
Land Application and Miningp. 93
Radioactive Contaminantsp. 94
Military Sources of Contaminationp. 97
Classification of Organic Compoundsp. 98
Inorganic Compounds in Groundwaterp. 107
A Typical Industrial Waste Sitep. 108
Hydrogeologic Site Investigationsp. 113
Introductionp. 113
Development of Conceptual Site Modelp. 114
Strategy for Hydrogeologic Site Investigationsp. 115
Development of a Detailed Site Investigation Workplanp. 122
Data Collection Methodsp. 125
Geologic Data Acquisitionp. 126
Hydrologic Data Acquisitionp. 142
Acquisition of Soil and Groundwater Quality Datap. 148
Data Evaluation Proceduresp. 152
Contaminant Transport Mechanismsp. 159
Introductionp. 159
Advection Processp. 161
Diffusion and Dispersion Processesp. 162
Mass Transport Equationsp. 165
One-Dimensional Modelsp. 170
Governing Flow and Transport Equationsp. 175
Analytical Methodsp. 177
Multidimensional Methodsp. 181
Tests for Dispersivityp. 185
Natural Gradient Field Tests for Dispersionp. 190
Contaminant Fate Processesp. 203
Introductionp. 203
Sorption and Desorptionp. 204
Abiotic Fate Processesp. 215
Volatilizationp. 218
Biodegradationp. 219
Evaluation of Fate Processesp. 231
Modeling Biodegradation and Natural Attenuationp. 237
Kinetics and Rates of Biodegradationp. 237
Modeling Biodegradationp. 244
Biodegradation Modelsp. 246
Analytical Natural Attenuation Modelsp. 258
Numerical Natural Attenuation Modelsp. 266
Field Site Applicationsp. 274
Flow and Transport in the Unsaturated Zonep. 289
Capillary Actionp. 289
Soil-Water Characteristic Curvesp. 291
Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivityp. 294
Governing Equation for Unsaturated Flowp. 295
Measurement of Soil Propertiesp. 297
Infiltration Modelsp. 298
Transport Processes in the Unsaturated Zonep. 303
Governing Equations for Vapor Transportp. 308
Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Modelsp. 315
Numberical Modeling of Contaminant Transportp. 335
Introductionp. 335
Numerical Methodsp. 345
Finite Difference Methodsp. 353
Finite Element Methodsp. 364
Method of Characteristics (MOC)p. 365
Numerical Flow Modelsp. 367
Contaminant Transport Modelsp. 371
Modeling With Graphical Pre-Processorsp. 375
Applying Numerical Models to Field Sitesp. 381
Nonaqueous Phase Liquidsp. 391
Introductionp. 391
Types of NAPLsp. 397
NAPL Transport -- General Processesp. 401
NAPL Transport -- Computational Methodsp. 414
Fate of NAPLs in the Subsurfacep. 422
Characterizing NAPLs at Remediation Sitesp. 429
Natural Attenuation and Risk Based Corrective Actionp. 441
Introductionp. 441
General Principles Behind Natural Attenuationp. 448
Natural Attenuation Protocols and Guidancep. 451
Demonstrating Natural Attenuationp. 456
Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA)p. 471
Ground Water Remediation Alternativesp. 479
Introduction to Remediation Methodsp. 479
Remedial Alternativesp. 481
Containment Methods for Source Controlp. 483
Hydraulic Controls and Pump and Treat Systemsp. 488
Bioremediationp. 497
Soil Vapor Extraction Systemsp. 501
Remediating NAPL Sitesp. 507
Emerging Remediation Technologiesp. 512
Case Studies of Remediationp. 521
Legal Protection of Ground Waterp. 545
The Process of Ground Water Protectionp. 546
The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974p. 547
The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976p. 550
The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment of 1984 (HSWA)p. 558
CERCLAp. 562
Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)p. 573
Homeworkp. 577
Indexp. 597
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem