Catalogue


Adapting to the stage : theater and the work of Henry James /
Chris Greenwood.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants., England ; Ashgtate, c2000.
description
195 p.
ISBN
184014663X (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants., England ; Ashgtate, c2000.
isbn
184014663X (hardback)
catalogue key
3591850
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Chris Greenwood gained his doctoral thesis from Cambridge University in 1998
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study demonstrates that from the 1890s onwards Henry James concentrated on adapting his novels and stories to and from the stage, and increasingly employed metaphors that spoke of novel-writing in terms of playwriting.
Long Description
The American novelist and playwright, Henry James, was drawn to the theatre and the shifting conventions of drama throughout his writing career. This study demonstrates that from the 1890s onwards James concentrated on adapting his novels and stories to and from the stage, and increasingly employed metaphors that spoke of novel-writing in terms of playwriting. Christopher Greenwood argues that these metaphors helped James to conceive of himself as an artist who composed characters dramatically and visually, and in so doing sets his novels significantly apart from those of his contemporaries.In the introduction to the first part of this book, Greenwood examines James's career within the context of contemporary European and North American theatre, providing an appraisal of what James gained from contemporary theatre, his position in that milieu, and what he brought to it. Part II of the book focuses on two novels: The Other House and The Spoils of Poynton, both of which illustrate the ways in which James used the mechanism of contemporary theatre to communicate a character's personality. Discussion of these two works is used to throw light on similar concerns that develop in James's later writing. The Wings of the Dove, The Golden Bowl and The Ambassadors become immediately more comprehensible through Greenwood's explanation that key aspects of their style are a function of James's reflections upon writing for the stage.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Introduction: Abandoning the Soliloquy/Staging the Narratorp. 1
Two Contexts: the Theatre and the Oeuvrep. 23
Psychological Space in 'The Summersoft Group' and the Late Playsp. 25
1881-94: Well-made Dramap. 53
'A Projected Form': Ellipsis and the Fourth Wallp. 96
Conclusion: Abandoning the Soliloquyp. 116
'The Theatrical Straitjacket': The Other House and The Spoils of Poyntonp. 125
The 'Cultivation of Limits'p. 127
The Other House: Psychology Embodiedp. 148
Fleda's Sense of the Past: The 'Poetry of ... Something Sensibly Gone'p. 160
Conclusion: The Material Selfp. 174
Bibliographyp. 181
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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