Catalogue


The author's due : printing and the prehistory of copyright /
Joseph Loewenstein.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2002.
description
x, 349 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226490408 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2002.
isbn
0226490408 (alk. paper)
contents note
An introduction to bibliographical politics -- The reformation of the press : patent, copyright, piracy -- Monopolies commercial and doctrinal -- Ingenuity and the mercantile muse -- Monopolizing culture : two case studies -- Personality and print : the genetics of intellectual property -- Milton's talent : the emergence of authorial copyright -- Authentic reproductions.
catalogue key
3575975
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joseph Loewenstein is professor of English at Washington University
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The Author's Due offers a sustained investigation of the emergence of proprietary authorship from the establishment of a printing industry in England to the passage, in 1610, of the Statute of Anne, which provided the legal underpinnings for modern copyright. Joseph Loewenstein reveals that copyright is a form of monopoly that can only be understood as part of a much broader battle for and against other early modern protectionisms, such as commercial trusts, manufacturing patents, confessional exclusions, and acts of censorship. Throughout this ambitious work, Loewenstein shows how the regulation of the English press set competing interests and monopolistic structures against each other, and how this institutional friction proved to be artistically and politically productive. Struggles between journeymen and masters, guildmembers and nonprofessionals, printers and booksellers, as well as authors and publishers, all figure decisively in The Author's Due . Loewenstein contends that these rivalries crucially shaped early capitalist economics while fundamentally affecting the literary and intellectual practices of early modern authors such as Swift, Pope, Milton, and Shakespeare. With its probing look, then, at the origins of copyright and their profound influence on early modern English literature, The Author's Due recovers the central achievements of earlier bibliographic scholars for a whole new generation of critics. A work of both cultural and institutional history, it will prove to be a watershed for historians of printing, legal and literary scholars, and anyone interested in the politics of information, intellectual property, and new media.
Flap Copy
The Author's Dueoffers a sustained investigation of the emergence of proprietary authorship from the establishment of a printing industry in England to the passage, in 1610, of the Statute of Anne, which provided the legal underpinnings for modern copyright. Joseph Loewenstein reveals that copyright is a form of monopoly that can only be understood as part of a much broader battle for and against other early modern protectionisms, such as commercial trusts, manufacturing patents, confessional exclusions, and acts of censorship. Throughout this ambitious work, Loewenstein shows how the regulation of the English press set competing interests and monopolistic structures against each other, and how this institutional friction proved to be artistically and politically productive. Struggles between journeymen and masters, guildmembers and nonprofessionals, printers and booksellers, as well as authors and publishers, all figure decisively inThe Author's Due. Loewenstein contends that these rivalries crucially shaped early capitalist economics while fundamentally affecting the literary and intellectual practices of early modern authors such as Swift, Pope, Milton, and Shakespeare. With its probing look, then, at the origins of copyright and their profound influence on early modern English literature,The Author's Duerecovers the central achievements of earlier bibliographic scholars for a whole new generation of critics. A work of both cultural and institutional history, it will prove to be a watershed for historians of printing, legal and literary scholars, and anyone interested in the politics of information, intellectual property, and new media.
Summaries
Main Description
The Author's Due offers an institutional and cultural history of books, the book trade, and the bibliographic ego. Joseph Loewenstein traces the emergence of possessive authorship from the establishment of a printing industry in England to the passage of the 1710 Statute of Anne, which provided the legal underpinnings for modern copyright. Along the way he demonstrates that the culture of books, including the idea of the author, is intimately tied to the practical trade of publishing those books. As Loewenstein shows, copyright is a form of monopoly that developed alongside a range of related protections such as commercial trusts, manufacturing patents, and censorship, and cannot be understood apart from them. The regulation of the press pitted competing interests and rival monopolistic structures against one anotherguildmembers and nonprofessionals, printers and booksellers, authors and publishers. These struggles, in turn, crucially shaped the literary and intellectual practices of early modern authors, as well as early capitalist economic organization. With its probing look at the origins of modern copyright, The Author's Due will prove to be a watershed for historians, literary critics, and legal scholars alike.
Main Description
The Author's Dueoffers an institutional and cultural history of books, the book trade, and the bibliographic ego. Joseph Loewenstein traces the emergence of possessive authorship from the establishment of a printing industry in England to the passage of the 1710 Statute of Anne, which provided the legal underpinnings for modern copyright. Along the way he demonstrates that the culture of books, including the idea of the author, is intimately tied to the practical trade of publishing those books. As Loewenstein shows, copyright is a form of monopoly that developed alongside a range of related protections such as commercial trusts, manufacturing patents, and censorship, and cannot be understood apart from them. The regulation of the press pitted competing interests and rival monopolistic structures against one another--guildmembers and nonprofessionals, printers and booksellers, authors and publishers. These struggles, in turn, crucially shaped the literary and intellectual practices of early modern authors, as well as early capitalist economic organization. With its probing look at the origins of modern copyright,The Author's Duewill prove to be a watershed for historians, literary critics, and legal scholars alike.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Suitable for historians, literary critics and legal scholars, this text offers an institutional and cultural history of books, the book trade and the bibliographic ego.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
The Regulated Crisis of New Mediap. 1
An Introduction to Bibliographical Politicsp. 3
Theories of authorship
Resisting Foucault
Institutional origins of intellectual property
Millar v. Taylor
Donaldson v. Becket
The Reformation of the Press: Patent, Copyright, Piracyp. 27
The piracies of John Wolfe
The regulation of the Elizabethan book trade
Guild structure in the transition to capitalism
Monopolies Commercial and Doctrinalp. 52
Italics and the genetics of intellectual property
Mercantilist protectionism and early modern technology, I
Interchapter: Possessive Authorshipp. 82
From Protectionism to Propertyp. 89
Ingenuity and the Mercantile Musep. 91
Mereantilist protectionism, II
Darcy v. Aleyn
"Invention" and "Genius"
Monopolizing Culture: Two Case Studiesp. 132
Davenant v. Hurdis
Harington's toilet
George Wither asserts authorial property
Personality and Print: The Genetics of Intellectual Propertyp. 152
"Press agency": personhood in book culture
Censorship and intellectual property
Areopagitica
Milton's Talent: The Emergence of Authorial Copyrightp. 192
Restoration press regulation and the rhetoric of authorship
Plagiarism and the Whig Milton
Swift, Pope, and the Statute of Anne
The Laughable Termp. 247
Authentic Reproductionsp. 249
Shakespeare and international copyright
Modernist technologies of reproduction and the institutional history of the book
The Wise forgeries
Notesp. 263
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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