Catalogue


Britannia's issue : the rise of British literature from Dryden to Ossian /
Howard D. Weinbrot.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
description
xvii, 625 p.
ISBN
0521325196
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
isbn
0521325196
catalogue key
357394
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-07:
A major synthesis by a major scholar, Britannia's Issue presents an innovative account of 18th-century Britain's sense of itself as racially and cultural mixed: as the joint product of Roman, Celtic, Germanic, and even Jewish culture, and as all the stronger--and more free--for this living heritage of diversity. Readers of Weinbrot's earlier Augustus Caesar in "Augustan" England (CH, Oct'78), on "neoclassical" England's manifold doubts about its classical forebears, will now see where that earlier argument was tending: "Augustan" England characteristically saw itself as drawing on its non classical traditions to turn the bellicose and oppressive pax Romana into a peacefully productive, commercial pax Britannica--a change testified to in the transformative acts of literary imitation so characteristic of the age. Weinbrot explores his thesis through readings of major texts by Dryden, Pope, Handel, Gray, Smart, and Macpherson, as well as by reference to thousands of lesser-known works; he sheds important light on 18th-century notions of "imitation," on the Battle of the Ancients and Moderns, and especially on British thinking about its own racial past. Upper-division undergraduate and up. D. L. Patey; Smith College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1994
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Summaries
Description for Library
This, Howard D. Weinbrot's magnum opus, draws on a large range of material to chronicle the developing confidence in British national literature from the 1670s to the 1770s. Using varied classical, English, French, historical, literary, philosophical, political and Scottish sources, Professor Weinbrot shows that one of the central trends of eighteenth-century Britain was the movement away from classical towards native values and models. This learned and lucidly written book helps to characterize the complex and varied culture in eighteenth-century Britain.
Main Description
This, Howard D.Weinbrot's magnum opus, draws on a large range of material to chronicle the developing confidence in British national literature from the 1670s to the 1770s. Using varied biblical, classical, English, economic, French, historical, literary, philosophical, political and Scottish sources, Professor Weinbrot shows that one of the central trends of eighteenth-century Britain was the movement away from classical towards native values and models. He demonstrates for example that Dryden's Essay of Dramatick Poesy reflects nationalist aesthetics, that Pope's Rape of the Lock affirms domestic peace while rejecting Homeric violence, and that Windsor Forest sings unRoman peaceful expansion through trade. This learned and lucidly written book offers revisionist but historically grounded interpretations of these and many other important works. It also helps to characterise the complex and varied culture in eighteenth-century Britain.
Main Description
This, Howard D.Weinbrot's magnum opus, draws on a large range of material to chronicle the developing confidence in British national literature from the 1670s to the 1770s. Using varied biblical, classical, English, economic, French, historical, literary, philosophical, political and Scottish sources, Professor Weinbrot shows that one of the central trends of eighteenth-century Britain was the movement away from classical towards native values and models. He demonstrates for example that Dryden's Essay of Dramatick Poesy reflects nationalist aesthetics, that Pope's Rape of the Lock affirms domestic peace while rejecting Homeric violence, and that Windsor Forest sings un-Roman peaceful expansion through trade. This learned and lucidly written book offers revisionist but historically grounded interpretations of these and many other important works. It also helps to characterize the complex and varied culture in eighteenth-century Britain.
Description for Bookstore
This book chronicles the developing confidence in British national literature from the 1670s to the 1770s. Using many varied historical and literary sources, Professor Weinbrot shows that one of the central trends of eighteenth-century Britain was the movement away from classical towards native values and models.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments and editorial notes
Introduction: an overview of scope and method
Contexts: Intellectual, Psychological and National: Prologue to part I
Moderns, ancients and the secular: the limits of southern hegemony
The spiritual: truth was not the inclination of the first ages
An ambition to excel
The making of a modern canon
Texts Within Contexts
Essaying England: Our Genius, Our Clime: Prologue to part II
Dryden's 'Essay of Dramatick Poesie': the poetics of nationalism
Homeric wars
The 'Pax Romana' and the 'Pax Britannica': the ethics of war and the ethics of trade
'Windsor Forest' and 'The Rape of the Lock'
Growing On One's Own: The British Ode From Cowley to Gray: Prologue to part III
Greek jockeys and British heroes: the rise and fall of the Pindaric ode
Odes to the nation and the north: Dryden, Collins and Gray
Expanding the Borders
Jews and Jesus: This Israel, This England: Prologue to part IV
The house of David and the house of St. George: philosemitism, Hebrews, and Handel
Beyond the Hebrew leaven: smart and the God in Christ
Celts, Germans, and Scots: Towards a United Kingdom: Prologue to part V
Celtic Scotland
Ossian in Scotland, Great Britain and modern Europe: joining Britannia's issue
Conclusion: synthesizing all the nations under heaven
Appendix
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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