Catalogue


Neither Black nor white : slavery and race relations in Brazil and the United States /
Carl N. Degler.
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, 1986, c1971.
description
xxi, 302 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0299109143 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, 1986, c1971.
isbn
0299109143 (pbk.) :
general note
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Macmillan, 1971.
catalogue key
3552626
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Bancroft Prize, USA, 1972 : Won
Pulitzer Prize, USA, 1972 : Won
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Degler succeeds admirably in bringing logic and common sense to the main question that has dominated historians for twenty-five years. His synthesis of the Latin scholarship with what is now known about slavery in this country is lucid, and stands up to several close readings."New York Review of Books
"Degler succeeds admirably in bringing logic and common sense to the main question that has dominated historians for twenty-five years. His synthesis of the Latin scholarship with what is now known about slavery in this country is lucid, and stands up to several close readings."--New York Review of Books
"In the early 1970s when studies in social history were beginning to blossom on the North American scene, Carl Degler's prize-winning contribution was a thoughtful provacative essay in comparative history. Its thoughtfulness has not diminished with the years. Indeed, it is as topical today as when it was first published. The Brazilian experience with rapid industrialization and its attempt to restore democratic government indicates that the issues which Degler treated in the early 1970s are more pertinent than ever today."Franklin W. Knight, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University
"In the early 1970s when studies in social history were beginning to blossom on the North American scene, Carl Degler's prize-winning contribution was a thoughtful provacative essay in comparative history. Its thoughtfulness has not diminished with the years. Indeed, it is as topical today as when it was first published. The Brazilian experience with rapid industrialization and its attempt to restore democratic government indicates that the issues which Degler treated in the early 1970s are more pertinent than ever today."--Franklin W. Knight, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University
"This is one of the most important books written on the subject of comparative race relations since Slave and Citizen [by Frank Tannenbaum]. Degler's treatment of the nature of contemporary race relations is masterful."- The Americas
“This is one of the most important books written on the subject of comparative race relations since Slave and Citizen [by Frank Tannenbaum]. Degler’s treatment of the nature of contemporary race relations is masterful.”- The Americas
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Carl Degler's 1971 Pulitzer-Prize-winning study of comparative slavery in Brazil and the United States is reissued in the Wisconsin paperback edition, making it accessible for all students of American and Latin American history and sociology. Until Degler's groundbreaking work, scholars were puzzled by the differing courses of slavery and race relations in the two countries. Brazil never developed a system of rigid segregation, such as appeared in the United States, and blacks in Brazil were able to gain economically and retain far more of their African culture. Rejecting the theory of Giberto Freyre and Frank Tannenbaum--that Brazilian slavery was more humane--Degler instead points to a combination of demographic, economic, and cultural factors as the real reason for the differences.
Main Description
Carl Degler's 1971 Pulitzer-Prize-winning study of comparative slavery in Brazil and the United States is reissued in the Wisconsin paperback edition, making it accessible for all students of American and Latin American history and sociology. Until Degler's groundbreaking work, scholars were puzzled by the differing courses of slavery and race relations in the two countries. Brazil never developed a system of rigid segregation, such as appeared in the United States, and blacks in Brazil were able to gain economically and retain far more of their African culture. Rejecting the theory of Giberto Freyre and Frank Tannenbaum-that Brazilian slavery was more humane-Degler instead points to a combination of demographic, economic, and cultural factors as the real reason for the differences. "In the early 1970s when studies in social history were beginning to blossom on the North American scene, Carl Degler's prize-winning contribution was a thoughtful provocative essay in comparative history. Its thoughtfulness has not diminished with the years. Indeed, it is as topical today as when it was first published. The Brazilian experience with rapid industrialization and its attempt to restore democratic government indicates that the issues which Degler treated in the early 1970s are more pertinent than ever today."-Franklin W. Knight, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University.
Main Description
Carl Degler’s 1971 Pulitzer-Prize-winning study of comparative slavery in Brazil and the United States is reissued in the Wisconsin paperback edition, making it accessible for all students of American and Latin American history and sociology. Until Degler’s groundbreaking work, scholars were puzzled by the differing courses of slavery and race relations in the two countries. Brazil never developed a system of rigid segregation, such as appeared in the United States, and blacks in Brazil were able to gain economically and retain far more of their African culture. Rejecting the theory of Giberto Freyre and Frank Tannenbaum-that Brazilian slavery was more humane-Degler instead points to a combination of demographic, economic, and cultural factors as the real reason for the differences. “In the early 1970s when studies in social history were beginning to blossom on the North American scene, Carl Degler’s prize-winning contribution was a thoughtful provocative essay in comparative history. Its thoughtfulness has not diminished with the years. Indeed, it is as topical today as when it was first published. The Brazilian experience with rapid industrialization and its attempt to restore democratic government indicates that the issues which Degler treated in the early 1970s are more pertinent than ever today.”-Franklin W. Knight, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University.

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