Catalogue


In the shadow of Nelson : the naval leadership of Admiral Sir Charles Cotton, 1753-1812 /
Paul C. Krajeski ; foreword by N.A.M. Rodger.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000.
description
xx, 219 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0313310394 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000.
isbn
0313310394 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3549971
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-07-01:
Krajeski (US Military Academy) starts with an interesting idea, which is to study the career of an admiral who did not win a famous battle but whose steady leadership was nevertheless essential to the successful application of sea power. Charles Cotton appears to be a good candidate. Although he never particularly distinguished himself in battle, Cotton rose steadily through the officer corps during the War of American Independence and the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars to attain command successively of the Mediterranean and Channel Fleets between 1810 and his death in 1812. He was particularly involved with the naval side of the Peninsular War. But Cotton left few personal papers; Krajeski's account of his career consists mostly of a recitation of fleet movements and quotations from the stilted language of official dispatches. The reader has little sense of Cotton's character or ideas, the alternatives he considered, or the professional choices he had to make. Recommended only for extensive naval history collections. J. R. Breihan; Loyola College in Maryland
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ...Krajeski's fine study goes far beyond the old-fashioned hagiograpies accorded to many of his contemporaries...the book is thoroughly researched, and provides particular insight into the porofessional dynamics of Cotton's career, raising questions about his merit and his courage.'' The Journal of Military History
'œRecommended...for extensive naval history collections.'' Choice
'œIn this volume Paul Krajeski has had to confront the divergence between Cotton's service record and his historical anonymity. His efforts shed valuable light on myriad subjects, among them the interplay between Admiralty and station chief in a vexed and volatile situation such as Cotton encountered in the Tagus and, refreshingly, the equally perplexed matter of overseas fleet logistics in the age of sail...solid and informative...Krajeski has produced a valuable study of the means by which British naval and military policy was carried out, especially in the post-Trafalgar era...'' The Northern Mariner
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2000
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Summaries
Long Description
Sir Charles Cotton served in the Royal Navy from 1772 to 1812. Unfortunately timing precluded his presence at Trafalgar, but he participated in other pivotal battles, including The Saintes and "The Glorious First of June." His career culminated with command of a squadron based off Lisbon, Portugal, followed by commands of the prestigious Mediterranean and Channel Fleets. Each of these commands notably influenced the Peninsular War. This study helps to answer one of the most frequently asked questions about this era: How did British naval power contribute to the defeat of Napoleon? Krajeski expands current thinking about the Royal Navy's leadership and accomplishments during this period. Cotton belongs to the most storied generation of naval commanders in British history. They first served during the American Revolution, participating in numerous combined operations and naval engagements along the North American coast, in the Caribbean, and elsewhere. The experience that they gained between 1775 and 1783 figured prominently upon the resumption of war against France in 1793. As a captain in the Channel Fleet, Cotton fought at the Battle of "The Glorious First of June" in 1794 and actively blockaded the French Atlantic ports; as an admiral between 1797 and 1806, he focused primarily on the blockade of Brest. In 1808 he achieved a modest measure of contemporary fame as commander of a squadron that supported Sir Arthur Wellesley's campaign in Portugal. Cotton subsequently influenced the Peninsular War as commander of the Mediterranean and Channel Fleet. He died while in command of the Channel Fleet.
Long Description
Sir Charles Cotton served in the Royal Navy from 1772 to 1812. Unfortunately timing precluded his presence at Trafalgar, but he participated in other pivotal battles, including The Saintes and The Glorious First of June. His career culminated with command of a squadron based off Lisbon, Portugal, followed by commands of the prestigious Mediterranean and Channel Fleets. Each of these commands notably influenced the Peninsular War. This study helps to answer one of the most frequently asked questions about this era: How did British naval power contribute to the defeat of Napoleon? Krajeski expands current thinking about the Royal Navy's leadership and accomplishments during this period. Cotton belongs to the most storied generation of naval commanders in British history. They first served during the American Revolution, participating in numerous combined operations and naval engagements along the North American coast, in the Caribbean, and elsewhere. The experience that they gained between 1775 and 1783 figured prominently upon the resumption of war against France in 1793. As a captain in the Channel Fleet, Cotton fought at the Battle of The Glorious First of June in 1794 and actively blockaded the French Atlantic ports; as an admiral between 1797 and 1806, he focused primarily on the blockade of Brest. In 1808 he achieved a modest measure of contemporary fame as commander of a squadron that supported Sir Arthur Wellesley's campaign in Portugal. Cotton subsequently influenced the Peninsular War as commander of the Mediterranean and Channel Fleet. He died while in command of the Channel Fleet.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. xv
A Commissioned Sea Officer: The Formative Years, 1772-1783p. 1
Continuing Education: Service in the Channel Fleet, 1793-1797p. 17
Channel Fleet Admiral: A Decade of Understudy, 1797-1806p. 29
An Admiral's Flag at Lisbon: Squadron Command off the Tagus, January-May 1808p. 51
Portugal Takes Center Stage: Preparation for the British Army, June-July 1808p. 79
Cotton and Wellesley's Amphibious Campaign in Portugal, August 1808p. 95
Aftermath of Vimeiro: The Convention of Cintra and a Permanent Continental Foothold, August-December 1808p. 111
Succeeding Lord Collingwood: Cotton Takes Command of the Mediterranean Fleet, April-August 1810p. 137
Rising Tide in the West: The Peninsular War and the Mediterranean Fleet, September 1810-July 1811p. 159
Channel Fleet Command: The Peninsula Encircled, August 1811-February 1812p. 183
Epiloguep. 195
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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