Catalogue


Race and empire in British politics /
Paul B. Rich.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
description
xiii, 272 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0521320178
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
isbn
0521320178
general note
Includes index.
cop.2 is a 1988 reprint.
catalogue key
3539829
 
Bibliography: p. 263-165.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-02:
Rich (University of Warwick) has already published extensively in the field of race relations. His meticulously researched and carefully written study is an important contribution to the history of Britain's now defunct empire and its very live problem of inner-city racial tensions. The intentions of the empire's rulers were always, Rich argues, benignly paternal-although local grass-roots reality was often very different. One of the most important of the empire's administrative devices, indirect rule, was based on a cultural relativism propounded by Mary Kingsley and her circle. The racist component of fevered nationalism largely passed by Britain, secure and self-confident in its sense of nationhood. As empire waned, however, and nonwhite communities grew in Britain, ancient xenophobia reinforced by imperial legacies like the belief in a hierarchy of races provided the basis for the ``Keep Britain British'' feelings voiced by Enoch Powell. Rich has done a powerful study of a significant subject. College and university libraries.-R.A. Callahan, University of Delaware
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1987
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Summaries
Main Description
This book discusses British thought on race and racial differences in the latter phases of empire from the 1890s to the early 1960s. It focuses on the role of racial ideas in British society and politics and looks at the decline in Victorian ideas of white Anglo-Saxon racial solidarity. The impact of anthropology is shown to have had a major role in shifting the focus on race in British ruling class circles from a classical and humanistic imperialism towards a more objective study of ethnic and cultural groups by the 1930s and 1940s. As the empire turned into a commonwealth, liberal ideas on race relations helped shape the post-war rise of 'race relations' sociology. Drawing on extensive government documents, private papers, newspapers, magazines and interviews this book breaks new ground in the analysis of racial discourse in twentieth-century British politics and the changing conception of race amongst anthropologists, sociologists and the professional intelligentsia.
Description for Bookstore
This book discusses British thought on race and racial differences in the latter phases of empire from the 1890s to the early 1960s. It focuses on the role of racial ideas in British society and politics and looks at the decline in Victorian ideas of white Anglo-Saxon racial solidarity.
Main Description
This book discusses British thought on race and racial differences in the latter phases of empire from the 1890s to the early 1960s. It focuses on the role of racial ideas in British society and politics and looks at the decline in Victorian ideas of white Anglo-Saxon racial solidarity. The impact of anthropology is shown to have had a major role in shifting the focus on race in British ruling class circles from a classical and humanistic imperialism towards a more objective study of ethnic and cultural groups by the 1930S and 1940s. As the empire turned into a commonwealth, liberal ideas on race relations helped shape the post war rise of 'race relations' sociology. Drawing on extensive government documents, private papers, newspapers, magazines and interviews this book breaks new ground in the analysis of racial discourse in twentieth-century British politics and the changing conception of race amongst anthropologists, sociologists and the professional intelligentsia.
Table of Contents
Preface
List of abbreviations
Introduction
Empire and Anglo-Saxonism
Mary Kingsley and the emergence of cultural relativism
The Commonwealth ideal and the problem of racial segregation
The widening critique of empire
Sociology, anthropology and race
The 'half-caste' pathology
Colonial development, war and black immigration
End of empire and the rise of 'race relations'
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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