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Sundays down South : a pastor's stories /
James O. Chatham.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1999.
description
xv, 224 p.
ISBN
157806175X (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1999.
isbn
157806175X (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3512363
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A revealing picture of southern character as seen in a minister's recollections of his congregations
Flap Copy
A revealing picture of southern character as seen in a ministerÂ's recollections of his congregations
Flap Copy
A revealing picture of southern character as seen in a minister’s recollections of his congregations
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-11-15:
"This is not a religious book," notes Chatham, a pastor with a social conscience who gives us stories about the lives of poor people struggling "to live in the sunshine" in four Southern locations. Poignantly addressing daily life, these cultural pictures tell tales of heroism and tragedy, ingenuity and vanity, triumph and foolishness. Along the way, Chatham observes that moral purpose and conviction are essential for survival and that "the most sturdy and courageous hearts often come in very plain packaging." Chatham explains that his churches were always "more concerned with life in the present than with life in the hereafter," and his stories reveal him to have a listening heart that only judges the outside world insofar as it promises and never delivers. Recommended for public libraries.ÄGeorge Westerlund, Providence P.L., Palmyra, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, November 1999
Library Journal, November 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A revealing picture of southern character as seen in a ministeras recollections of his congregations
Main Description
Perhaps the best way to portray that unique cultural phenomenon called "Southerners" is by telling tales about how these particular people live. And who could perceive them better, heart and soul, than their preacher? James O. Chatham, a Presbyterian minister who served several congregations during four decades, witnessed to a full spectrum of Southern types during his years in the pulpit. He met all kinds, and he strived to minister to each with a compassionate, pastoral hand. His book of tales about his experiences with them puts a human face on the southern portrait. In Sundays Down South: A Pastor's Stories he recounts experiences with people who were both heroic and pathetic, wise and foolish, visionary and blind. "Two things I have taken from these [stories]," he says. "One is the insight that the most sturdy and courageous hearts often come in very plain packaging. The other is the importance of conviction, of having in your soul a motivating cause." He preached in a variety of southern locales--a paper mill town in the mountains of westernVirginia, two small communities in southwestern Mississippi, a tobacco town in Piedmont North Carolina, and a city on the edge of Kentucky's bluegrass region. The people he encountered in his pastorates are flawed but charming, even admirable in some instances. "It is impossible," he says, "to tell from the outside who the giants will be. You have to be attentive, to watch and listen carefully, sometimes to dig to uncover the people you really want to meet." Religion, race, sex, family ties, economic hardship, health, and education all arise in these tales, and Chatham never condemns or accuses. Nor does he shy from an honest portrayal of reality and of the prejudice that persists in the South. With a poignant but plain style, he makes clear his love for his parishioners and his attempt to infuse their lives with the inspired dignity that has moved him through a lifetime of preaching and listening. James O. Chatham has been pastor of Highland Presbyterian Church in Louisville, Kentucky, since 1981. He has published articles in Word and Witness, Today's Teacher, the Winston Salem Journal, and the Louisville Courier-Journal.
Main Description
Perhaps the best way to portray that unique cultural phenomenon called "Southerners" is by telling tales about how these particular people live. And who could perceive them better, heart and soul, than their preacher? James O. Chatham, a Presbyterian minister who served several congregations during four decades, witnessed to a full spectrum of Southern types during his years in the pulpit. He met all kinds, and he strived to minister to each with a compassionate, pastoral hand.His book of tales about his experiences with them puts a human face on the southern portrait. In Sundays Down South: A Pastor's Stories he recounts experiences with people who were both heroic and pathetic, wise and foolish, visionary and blind. "Two things I have taken from these [stories]," he says. "One is the insight that the most sturdy and courageous hearts often come in very plain packaging. The other is the importance of conviction, of having in your soul a motivating cause."He preached in a variety of southern locales--a paper mill town in the mountains of westernVirginia, two small communities in southwestern Mississippi, a tobacco town in Piedmont North Carolina, and a city on the edge of Kentucky's bluegrass region. The people he encountered in his pastorates are flawed but charming, even admirable in some instances. "It is impossible," he says, "to tell from the outside who the giants will be. You have to be attentive, to watch and listen carefully, sometimes to dig to uncover the people you really want to meet."Religion, race, sex, family ties, economic hardship, health, and education all arise in these tales, and Chatham never condemns or accuses. Nor does he shy from an honest portrayal of reality and of the prejudice that persists in the South. With a poignant but plain style, he makes clear his love for his parishioners and his attempt to infuse their lives with the inspired dignity that has moved him through a lifetime of preaching and listening.James O. Chatham has been pastor of Highland Presbyterian Church in Louisville, Kentucky, since 1981. He has published articles inWord and Witness,Today's Teacher, theWinston Salem Journal, and theLouisville Courier-Journal.
Main Description
Pictures the Southern character through tales from congregations across the region.
Unpaid Annotation
Perhaps the best way to portray that unique cultural phenomenon called "Southerners" is by telling tales about how these particular people live. And who could perceive them better, heart and soul, than their preacher? James O. Chatham, a Presbyterian minister who served several congregations during four decades, witnessed a full spectrum of Southern types during his years in the pulpit. He met all kinds, and he strived to minister to each with a compassionate, pastoral hand.In Sundays Down South: A Pastor's Stories he recounts experiences with people who were both heroic and pathetic, wise and foolish, visionary and blind. "Two things I have taken from these (stories), " he says. "One is the insight tha the most sturdy and courageous hearts often come in very plain packaging. The other is the importance of conviction, of having in your soul a motivating cause."He preached in a variety of southern locales -- a paper mill town in the mountains of western Virginia, two small communities in southwestern Mississippi, a tobacco town in Piedmont North Carolina, and a city on the edge of Kentucky's bluegrass region. The people he encountered in his pastorates are flawed but charming, even admirable in some instances. "It is impossible, " he says, "to tell from the outside who the giants will be. You have to be attentive, watch and listen carefully, sometimes dig to uncover the people you really want to meet."Religion, race, sex, family ties, economic hardship, health, and education all arise in these tales, and Chatham never condemns or accuses. Nor does he shy from an hones portrayal of reality and of the prejudice that persists in the South. With a poignant but plain style, he makesclear his love for his parishioners and his attempt to infuse their lives with the inspired dignity that has moved him through a lifetime of preaching and listening.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Covington, Virginia, 1962-1963p. 3
A Garland Instead of Ashesp. 6
Skeered of One Anotherp. 14
Amy's Giftp. 21
Springtime in the Mountainsp. 27
Fayette and Union Church, Mississippi, 1964-1966p. 31
Startersp. 38
Mr. Cecil's Worldp. 42
A Short Sermon by Mr. Buntp. 45
Standing on Holy Groundp. 50
The Jefferson County Boycottp. 54
Barbershopp. 63
The Shedrick Conspiracyp. 65
What No One Ever Knewp. 67
Gold, Frankincense, and Myrrhp. 72
Each in Its Timep. 77
From Miss Susie's Front Porchp. 80
Thus Did the Lord Sayp. 90
The Scots' Legacyp. 92
Nighttime Radiop. 97
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 1966-1973p. 102
Five Loaves and Two Fishp. 106
Seeing Things Differently Nowp. 109
Don't Say Itp. 115
Friends of a Different Sortp. 119
Something Wrong with Billp. 124
The Marriage of Two Worldsp. 127
"A Gift from the Lord"p. 130
Cluckersp. 133
George's Little Jump Shotp. 135
Let's Find Us a Poor Familyp. 137
Thou Shalt Receive No Pilep. 139
Louisville, Kentucky, 1977 to the Presentp. 143
I Can Handle Itp. 150
Unbounded Spunkp. 159
A Tale of Two Congregationsp. 163
Secret Livesp. 175
Wireless Transmissionp. 183
Everything's Going to Be All Right!p. 185
Faith Healingp. 187
Addictedp. 190
Samaritansp. 195
A Lot of Small Stonesp. 198
Keeping the Options Openp. 204
I Could Be Your Sonp. 207
Against My Better Judgmentp. 210
Community at a Crossroadsp. 213
Conclusionp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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