Catalogue


Women of the dawn /
Bunny McBride.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1999.
description
xii, 152 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0803232098 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1999.
isbn
0803232098 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3481245
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-04:
McBride chronicles the lives of four Mollies, all Wabanaki/Penobscot women from different centuries, who adapted to the non-Indian presence and attempts at assimilation in different ways. The stories of the four women provide a brief glimpse into the difficulties encountered by Maine Indians from the days of the fur traders to the present, and show how people struggled and survived. The life of Molly Dellis Nelson, better known by her stage name of Molly Spotted Elk (see McBride's biography Molly Spotted Elk, CH, Feb'96), serves as the theme connecting the women. With her account of Molly Dellis Nelson and her interest in the earlier Mollies and tribal history and culture, McBride ends on a note of optimism for tribal cultures. Because there is little biographical data available on Native American women, McBride used her knowledge of native culture to imagine how the women felt and behaved at crucial points in their lives. This creative approach to writing history is controversial, but a section on methodology and references explains the basis for McBride's reconstructions, which humanize the women and make their stories more interesting. General readers; undergraduates. M. J. Schneider; University of North Dakota
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A bold, successful effort that defies classification. A prose poem of beauty and honesty."-Portland Press Herald."The narrative begins with Molly Mathilde, a mother, peacemaker, and daughter of a famous chief. Born in the mid-1600s, when Wabanakis first experienced the full effects of colonial warfare, disease, and displacement, she provided a vital link for her people through her marriage to the French baron of St. Castin. The saga continues with the shrewd and legendary healer Molly Ockett and the reputed witchwoman Molly Molasses. The final chapter focuses on Molly Dellis Nelson (known as Spotted Elk), a celebrated performer on European stages who lived to see the dawn of Wabanaki cultural renewal in the modern era. Women of the Dawn is a welcome, informative, and valued contribution."-Midwest Book Review."I recommend Women of the Dawn, a short but rich exploration of the lives of four Wabanaki women, all named 'Molly.' . . . It is lyrical and poetic but based on many years of fieldwork and scholarship."-Harvard University Gazette."Rich in historic and visual detail, Women of the Dawn gives a poignant and compelling voice to long silent Native American women. . . . The book evokes powerful and haunting emotions."-Jill E. Shibles, President, National American Indian Court Judges Association."Penobscot women, like all Wabanaki women, have long been the guardians of their people. The four women profiled by McBride possessed energy and power that strengthened and sustained them. They changed the lives of those with whom they came in contact. A rare glimpse of these women can be seen within the pages of this book."-Donna M. Loring, Penobscot Nation Tribal Representative to the Maine State Legislature."I was enthralled by the passion and perseverance of the four Women of the Dawn whose courageous spirits ensured the survival of tribal lifestyles and values."-Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve, author of Completing the Circle."An excellent portrayal of four Native American women."-Hazel V. Jimerson Dean, Wolf Clan Mother and Faithkeeper, Allegany Seneca Nation.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
Friends of American Writers Literary AwardsWomen of the Dawn tells the stories of four remarkable Wabanaki Indian women who lived in northeast America during the four centuries that devastated their traditional world. Their courageous responses to tragedies brought on by European contact make up the heart of the book.The narrative begins with Molly Mathilde, a mother, a peacemaker, and the daughter of a famous chief. Born in the mid-1600s, when Wabanakis first experienced the full effects of colonial warfare, disease, and displacement, she provided a vital link for her people through her marriage to the French baron of St. Castin. The saga continues with the shrewd and legendary healer Molly Ockett and the reputed witchwoman Molly Molasses. The final chapter belongs to Molly Dellis Nelson (known as Spotted Elk), a celebrated performer on European stages who lived to see the dawn of Wabanaki cultural renewal in the modern era.A writer with an M.A. in anthropology, Bunny McBride's books include Molly Spotted Elk: A Penobscot in Paris. She is an adjunct lecturer of anthropology at Kansas State University and Principia College.
Main Description
Women of the Dawntells the stories of four remarkable Wabanaki Indian women who lived in northeast America during the four centuries that devastated their traditional world. Their courageous responses to tragedies brought on by European contact make up the heart of the book. The narrative begins with Molly Mathilde (1665-1717), a mother, a peacemaker, and the daughter of a famous chief. Born in the mid-1600s, when Wabanakis first experienced the full effects of colonial warfare, disease, and displacement, she provided a vital link for her people through her marriage to the French baron of St. Castin. The sage continues with the shrewd and legendary healer Molly Ockett (1740-1816) and the reputed witchwoman Molly Molasses (1775-1867). The final chapter belongs to Molly Dellis Nelson (1903-1977) (known as Spotted Elk), a celebrated performer on European stages who lived to see the dawn of Wabanaki cultural renewal in the modern era.
Publisher Fact Sheet
Story of four remarkable Wabanaki Indian women who lived in northeast America between the 17th & 20th centuries & explores their courageous responses to tragedies brought on by European contact.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Portagep. 1
Moon of Ripening Berries: Molly Mathilde (Marie Mathilde), ca. 1665-1717p. 5
Portagep. 39
Moon of Freezing Rivers: Molly Ockett (Marie Agathe), ca. 1740-1816p. 43
Portagep. 69
Moon of Blinding Snow: Molly Molasses (Mary Pelagie), ca. 1775-1867p. 73
Portagep. 95
Sowing Moon: Molly Dellis (Mary Alice Nelson Archambaud), 1903-1977p. 99
Portagep. 133
Methodology and Referencesp. 135
Illustrationsp. 152
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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